Social Sciences Foundation Degree

Course length: 2 years full-time, 3 years part-time

Overview

If you have an interest and background in social sciences then this course will take your interest further and prepare you for employment in a range of social sciences related settings.

What does this course cover?

This degree is taught in partnership with Halesowen College and you will be taught on campus at Halesowen College. The programme provides a wide-ranging overview of social science topics and brings together both theoretical issues and the practical knowledge of the work environment. After introductory modules which will prepare you for the study of social sciences, you will build on your knowledge of psychological and sociological concepts, before considering theoretical issues such as morality and society and the individual’s role within these areas.

As well as exploring more practical issues such as crime and the media and punishment and treatment, you will consider how to prepare for work in the social sciences areas before gaining the opportunity to undertake work placements, giving you the chance to gain relevant practical experience in a field of work you may wish to move into.

Special Features

There are opportunities for you to interact with other students, share your experiences and enhance your communication skills.

Progression Routes

Students may progress onto a top-up degree in social sciences such as Working with children, Young People and Families or Criminology or move onto employment in areas such as social work, teaching or uniformed services. This course could also lead to further areas of training in Psychology (Counselling and Forensics).


Newman University would like to draw your attention to our Academic Regulations. These regulations are your Terms of Reference and should be considered when making a decision to study with our institution.

Entry requirements

Typical UCAS tariff offer: 64 UCAS points

Usually a level 3 qualification, please contact Admissions for full details

Fees

Fees per academic year: 2017/18 

Full-time UK/EU Students: £9,250*

Part-time UK/EU Students: £4,500*

* Please note for 2018/19 the University reserves the right to increase fees broadly in line with increases in inflation, or to reflect changes in government funding policies or changes agreed by Parliament.

Finance and Scholarship information

Full-time course modules


As a full time student, you will study a total of 120 credits each year. Credits are made up of mandatory modules and you may have a list of optional modules to choose from. Not every programme offers optional modules and when an optional module is available it will be clearly marked. All modules are listed below and you may not be required to complete all of these modules. Most modules are 20 credits and dissertations are 40 credits. Please note that not all optional modules run every year. For further information please email admissions@newman.ac.uk.

Year 1 modules


PREPARING FOR SUCCESS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES


MODULE TITLE : PREPARING FOR SUCCESS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES

MODULE CODE : SS401F


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will act as a bridge between levels 3 and 4 to enable students to build on those key skills already developed and recognition of those still to be developed further. Students will be introduced to theories of learning and communication. Students will be encouraged to actively reflect on their key and transferable skills, for example, effective communication and interaction with others, the nature and demands of working as part of a team, with reference to a reflective learning journal. Students will audit their own skills, identify aspects that need improving and produce plans for self-development in those areas to demonstrate a progression of reflective practice.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Explore course of academic study on a foundation degree programme
  • Introduce learners to the FD and act as a bridging programme between levels 3 and 4
  • Provide an opportunity to develop and consolidate students’ independent academic study skills
  • Develop an awareness of how to communicate effectively in social science environments
  • Develop students’ use of information sources, retrieval and use in academic contexts
  • Provide students with an opportunity to evaluate their personal strengths and areas for development – specifically to examine themselves as learners.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Prepare students to follow a course of academic study on a foundation degree programme
  • Act as a bridging programme between levels 3 and 4
  • Provide an opportunity to develop and consolidate students’ independent academic study skills
  • Develop an awareness of how to communicate effectively in social science environments
  • Develop students’ use of information sources, retrieval and use in academic contexts
  • Provide students with an opportunity to evaluate their personal strengths and areas for development – specifically to examine themselves as learners.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Reflective Account (2500 words)

PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES


MODULE TITLE : PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES

MODULE CODE : SS402F


MODULE SUMMARY :

By the end of this module students will be familiar with the four main theoretical perspectives within psychology and demonstrate an ability to apply each perspective to real world applications (stress management, bystander behaviour, addiction and personality development). They will know how to assess relevant research studies and understand the basic research techniques employed by each perspective.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop understanding of theoretical perspectives in psychology (e.g. Biological, Behaviourist, Cognitive and Psychodynamic)
  • Create an awareness of and ability to appropriately apply theoretical perspectives in psychology to the role of stress management, bystander behaviour, addiction and personality development.
  • Enable learners to analyse and critique relevant research studies
  • Develop an awareness of the basic research methodologies utilised in each theoretical perspective.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

This module will provide the students with: 

  • The ability to assess the assumptions of 4 theoretical perspectives in psychology (e.g. Biological, Behaviourist, Cognitive and Psychodynamic)
  • An awareness of and ability to appropriately apply theoretical perspectives in psychology to the role of stress management, bystander behaviour, addiction and personality development
  • An ability to analyse and critique relevant research studies
  • an awareness of the basic research methodologies utilised in each theoretical perspective.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 20% Short Answer Questions (400 words)

Component 2 - 80% Essay (2000 words)

SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES


MODULE TITLE : SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES

MODULE CODE : SS403F


MODULE SUMMARY :

The module will introduce learners to the three 'founding' thinkers of modern sociology (Marx, Durkheim and Weber).  Learners will be able to identify, compare and critically assess theoretical approaches of the work of key sociological theorists and demonstrate an understanding of the turning of modern sociological theory against itself, and be introduced to the emergence of postmodernism.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

  • Explore the  'founding' thinkers of modern sociology - Marx, Durkheim and Weber
  • Develop students’ abilities to identify, compare and critically assess theoretical approaches of the work of key sociological theorists
  • Provide an introduction to the turning of modern sociological theory against itself, and the emergence of postmodernism.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students, will by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:   

  • Know the three 'founding' thinkers of modern sociology - Marx, Durkheim and Weber
  • Identify, compare and critically assess theoretical approaches of the work of key sociological theorists
  • Understand the turning of modern sociological theory against itself, and the emergence of postmodernism.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 80% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 20% Ongoing Discussion

RESEARCH METHODS


MODULE TITLE : RESEARCH METHODS

MODULE CODE : SS404F


MODULE SUMMARY :

The module will introduce students to key strategies that are used in psychological research, including designing an experiment, hypothesis testing, and statistical analysis. The main features of the module will involve the acquisition of practical skills in qualitative and quantitative research. Students will be introduced to SPSS; learning how to apply and carry out statistical tests, and how to report research findings.

The module will introduce students to the requirements of their level 5 project and prepare them for writing their dissertation proposal.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Develop students’ knowledge of quantitative and qualitative research and its use in a psychological
  • Provide students with the opportunity to explore a number of research methodologies that can be used to formulate a research hypothesis
  • Allow students the opportunity to apply theoretical approaches to a range of contexts and postulate relevance, viability and feasibility.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students should be able to: 

  • Demonstrate knowledge quantitative and qualitative research techniques
  • Analyse, synthesise and summarise information critically
  • Obtain and integrate several lines of evidence to formulate and test hypotheses
  • Communicate their subject appropriately to a variety of audiences using a range of formats
  • Use the internet and other electronic sources as a means of communication and a source of information to understand and demonstrate scientific report structure.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 80% Project (2000 words)

Component 2 - 20% Examination (1 hour)

HEALTH, EDUCATION AND WORK


HEALTH, EDUCATION AND WORK: details currently unavailable

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS


MODULE TITLE : GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

MODULE CODE : SS407F


MODULE SUMMARY :

Governments and politics form a crucial backdrop to all practical applications of social scientific ideas. This module will introduce students to the key institutions and processes which make up the British political system, and will explore how these are related to individual lives, international systems and social scientific ideas. It will draw on sociology, economics, political philosophy and international relations theory in surveying topics including democracy and elections, theories of the state, political parties, trade unions, markets, civil society, social movements and transnational institutions.   

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Introduce students to the basic political frameworks which govern life in the UK     
  • Compare British systems with those in other countries, with historical examples and with international institutions
  • Outline the rudiments of political philosophy
  • Reflect on the ways in which political philosophies are enacted and applied in real-world contexts
  • Familiarise students with the ways in which political philosophies and governmental practices affect individual lives and professional fields

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Explore the ways in which government and politics touch on their own lives and the lives of those around them.       
  • To study in detail how specific political institutions operate and relate to one-another
  • To demonstrate a critical awareness of how political processes apply to individual lives and collective endeavours. 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Poster (Group Work), 1500 words equivalent)

Component 2 - 60% Essay, 2000 words

Year 2 modules


ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY


MODULE TITLE : ABNORMAL PYSCHOLOGY

MODULE CODE : SS507F


MODULE SUMMARY :

By the end of this module students will be familiar with the concepts of normality and abnormality and with the physiological and psychological approaches to explaining anxiety disorders and eating disorders. Students will be able to evaluate the explanations in terms of strengths and weaknesses drawing on the effectiveness of treatments. Students will also be able to draw on research support to offer insight in to the validity, reliability, cultural and ethical considerations of diagnosis.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

The module aims to:

 

  • Examine the concepts of normality and abnormality including evaluation of the definitions of abnormal

  • Explore physiological causes (e.g. genetics, the brain, hormones and neurotransmitters) and psychological causes (e.g. behaviourist, cognitive, social and Psychodynamic) of anxiety disorders e.g. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and Obsessive Compulsive disorder

  • Discuss physiological causes (e.g. genetics, the brain, hormones and neurotransmitters) and psychological causes (e.g. behaviourist, cognitive, social and Psychodynamic) of eating disorders e.g. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

  • Debate the validity, reliability, cultural and ethical considerations of diagnosis

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

This module will provide the students with:

 

  • The ability to discuss the concepts of normality and abnormality including evaluation of the definitions

  • The ability to critically examine physiological and psychological cause of anxiety disorders

  • The ability to critically examine physiological and psychological cause of eating disorders

  • The ability to explore the validity, reliability, cultural and ethical considerations of diagnosis

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 80% Essay, 2000 words

Component 2 - 20% Group Presentation, 15 mins, 1500 words equivalent (usually 2 - 4 students)

WORK PLACEMENT


MODULE TITLE : WORK PLACEMENT

MODULE CODE : PLU502


MODULE SUMMARY :

This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 10.00
Independent : 90.00
Placement : 100.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement in a workplace setting.

  • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement and of their independent learning throughout the experience.

  • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.

  • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.

  • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to: 

  1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.

  2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.

  3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.

  4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - % PLACEMENT REGISTRATION FORM

Component 2 - 60% WORK PLACEMENT REFLECTION (2500 WORDS)

Component 3 - 40% WORK PLACEMENT EVALUATION: DIGITAL RESOURCE (1500 WORDS EQUIVALENT)

INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH PROJECT


INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH PROJECT: details currently unavailable

THEORIES OF CRIME


MODULE TITLE : THEORIES OF CRIME

MODULE CODE : SS502F


MODULE SUMMARY :

By the end of this module students will be familiar with the different types of crime and patterns and trends within criminal behaviour. They will be able to demonstrate how psychological and sociological perspectives can be used to explain the development of criminal behaviour. They will also be able to discuss rates and causes of reoffending.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Explore what constitutes a crime (historical and cultural differences), the prevalence of criminal behavior and trends in criminal behaviour
  • Encourage learners to reflect upon the physiological and psychological causes of criminal behaviour
  • Outline and evaluate Sociological theories of crime
  • An introduction to the causes of reoffending.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

This module will provide the students with:

 

  • The ability to discuss what constitutes a crime (historical and cultural differences), the prevalence of criminal behavior and trends in criminal behaviour
  • An awareness of physiological and psychological causes of criminal behaviour
  • An ability to critically evaluate Sociological theories of crime
  • The ability to critically examine causes of reoffending.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 80% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 20% Group Presentation

CRIME AND MEDIA


MODULE TITLE : CRIME AND MEDIA

MODULE CODE : SS503F


MODULE SUMMARY :

By the end of this module students will be familiar with the relationship between crime and the media. They will be able to demonstrate how official statistics on crime relate to the patterns of crime represented within the media. They will also be able to discuss social action approaches to the nature of crime and deviance and its relationship to the media.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Explore the relationship between the nature of criminality and the mass media
  • Exploration of the notion and relationship between ethnicity, gender and locality
  • Discussion of social action approaches to the nature of crime and deviance and its relationship to the media
  • An introduction to official statistics on crime and its relationship to the patterns of crime represented within the media.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students should be able to:

 

  • Understand the relationship between the nature of criminality and the mass media.
  • Explore the notions and relationships between ethnicity, gender and locality
  • Critically explore social action approaches to the nature of crime and deviance and its relationship to the media
  • Critically examine the official statistics on crime and its relationship to the patterns of crime represented within the media.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 20% Short Answer Questions (400 words)

Component 2 - 80% Examination (2 hours)

THE INDIVIDUAL, SOCIETY AND MORALITY


THE INDIVIDUAL, SOCIETY AND MORALITY: details currently unavailable

Part-time course modules


As a part time student, the amount of credits you complete each year may vary. Credits are made up of mandatory modules and you may have a list of optional modules to choose from. Not every programme offers optional modules and when an optional module is available it will be clearly marked. All modules are listed below and you may not be required to complete all of these modules. Most modules are 20 credits and dissertations are 40 credits. Please note that not all optional modules run every year. For further information please email registry@newman.ac.uk.

Year 1 modules


PREPARING FOR SUCCESS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES

MODULE TITLE : PREPARING FOR SUCCESS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES

MODULE CODE : SS401F


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will act as a bridge between levels 3 and 4 to enable students to build on those key skills already developed and recognition of those still to be developed further. Students will be introduced to theories of learning and communication. Students will be encouraged to actively reflect on their key and transferable skills, for example, effective communication and interaction with others, the nature and demands of working as part of a team, with reference to a reflective learning journal. Students will audit their own skills, identify aspects that need improving and produce plans for self-development in those areas to demonstrate a progression of reflective practice.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Explore course of academic study on a foundation degree programme
  • Introduce learners to the FD and act as a bridging programme between levels 3 and 4
  • Provide an opportunity to develop and consolidate students’ independent academic study skills
  • Develop an awareness of how to communicate effectively in social science environments
  • Develop students’ use of information sources, retrieval and use in academic contexts
  • Provide students with an opportunity to evaluate their personal strengths and areas for development – specifically to examine themselves as learners.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Prepare students to follow a course of academic study on a foundation degree programme
  • Act as a bridging programme between levels 3 and 4
  • Provide an opportunity to develop and consolidate students’ independent academic study skills
  • Develop an awareness of how to communicate effectively in social science environments
  • Develop students’ use of information sources, retrieval and use in academic contexts
  • Provide students with an opportunity to evaluate their personal strengths and areas for development – specifically to examine themselves as learners.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Reflective Account (2500 words)

PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES

MODULE TITLE : PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES

MODULE CODE : SS402F


MODULE SUMMARY :

By the end of this module students will be familiar with the four main theoretical perspectives within psychology and demonstrate an ability to apply each perspective to real world applications (stress management, bystander behaviour, addiction and personality development). They will know how to assess relevant research studies and understand the basic research techniques employed by each perspective.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop understanding of theoretical perspectives in psychology (e.g. Biological, Behaviourist, Cognitive and Psychodynamic)
  • Create an awareness of and ability to appropriately apply theoretical perspectives in psychology to the role of stress management, bystander behaviour, addiction and personality development.
  • Enable learners to analyse and critique relevant research studies
  • Develop an awareness of the basic research methodologies utilised in each theoretical perspective.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

This module will provide the students with: 

  • The ability to assess the assumptions of 4 theoretical perspectives in psychology (e.g. Biological, Behaviourist, Cognitive and Psychodynamic)
  • An awareness of and ability to appropriately apply theoretical perspectives in psychology to the role of stress management, bystander behaviour, addiction and personality development
  • An ability to analyse and critique relevant research studies
  • an awareness of the basic research methodologies utilised in each theoretical perspective.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 20% Short Answer Questions (400 words)

Component 2 - 80% Essay (2000 words)

SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES

MODULE TITLE : SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES

MODULE CODE : SS403F


MODULE SUMMARY :

The module will introduce learners to the three 'founding' thinkers of modern sociology (Marx, Durkheim and Weber).  Learners will be able to identify, compare and critically assess theoretical approaches of the work of key sociological theorists and demonstrate an understanding of the turning of modern sociological theory against itself, and be introduced to the emergence of postmodernism.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

  • Explore the  'founding' thinkers of modern sociology - Marx, Durkheim and Weber
  • Develop students’ abilities to identify, compare and critically assess theoretical approaches of the work of key sociological theorists
  • Provide an introduction to the turning of modern sociological theory against itself, and the emergence of postmodernism.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students, will by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:   

  • Know the three 'founding' thinkers of modern sociology - Marx, Durkheim and Weber
  • Identify, compare and critically assess theoretical approaches of the work of key sociological theorists
  • Understand the turning of modern sociological theory against itself, and the emergence of postmodernism.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 80% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 20% Ongoing Discussion

RESEARCH METHODS

MODULE TITLE : RESEARCH METHODS

MODULE CODE : SS404F


MODULE SUMMARY :

The module will introduce students to key strategies that are used in psychological research, including designing an experiment, hypothesis testing, and statistical analysis. The main features of the module will involve the acquisition of practical skills in qualitative and quantitative research. Students will be introduced to SPSS; learning how to apply and carry out statistical tests, and how to report research findings.

The module will introduce students to the requirements of their level 5 project and prepare them for writing their dissertation proposal.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Develop students’ knowledge of quantitative and qualitative research and its use in a psychological
  • Provide students with the opportunity to explore a number of research methodologies that can be used to formulate a research hypothesis
  • Allow students the opportunity to apply theoretical approaches to a range of contexts and postulate relevance, viability and feasibility.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students should be able to: 

  • Demonstrate knowledge quantitative and qualitative research techniques
  • Analyse, synthesise and summarise information critically
  • Obtain and integrate several lines of evidence to formulate and test hypotheses
  • Communicate their subject appropriately to a variety of audiences using a range of formats
  • Use the internet and other electronic sources as a means of communication and a source of information to understand and demonstrate scientific report structure.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 80% Project (2000 words)

Component 2 - 20% Examination (1 hour)

Year 2 modules


HEALTH, EDUCATION AND WORK

HEALTH, EDUCATION AND WORK: details currently unavailable

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

MODULE TITLE : GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

MODULE CODE : SS407F


MODULE SUMMARY :

Governments and politics form a crucial backdrop to all practical applications of social scientific ideas. This module will introduce students to the key institutions and processes which make up the British political system, and will explore how these are related to individual lives, international systems and social scientific ideas. It will draw on sociology, economics, political philosophy and international relations theory in surveying topics including democracy and elections, theories of the state, political parties, trade unions, markets, civil society, social movements and transnational institutions.   

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Introduce students to the basic political frameworks which govern life in the UK     
  • Compare British systems with those in other countries, with historical examples and with international institutions
  • Outline the rudiments of political philosophy
  • Reflect on the ways in which political philosophies are enacted and applied in real-world contexts
  • Familiarise students with the ways in which political philosophies and governmental practices affect individual lives and professional fields

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Explore the ways in which government and politics touch on their own lives and the lives of those around them.       
  • To study in detail how specific political institutions operate and relate to one-another
  • To demonstrate a critical awareness of how political processes apply to individual lives and collective endeavours. 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Poster (Group Work), 1500 words equivalent)

Component 2 - 60% Essay, 2000 words

THEORIES OF CRIME

MODULE TITLE : THEORIES OF CRIME

MODULE CODE : SS502F


MODULE SUMMARY :

By the end of this module students will be familiar with the different types of crime and patterns and trends within criminal behaviour. They will be able to demonstrate how psychological and sociological perspectives can be used to explain the development of criminal behaviour. They will also be able to discuss rates and causes of reoffending.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Explore what constitutes a crime (historical and cultural differences), the prevalence of criminal behavior and trends in criminal behaviour
  • Encourage learners to reflect upon the physiological and psychological causes of criminal behaviour
  • Outline and evaluate Sociological theories of crime
  • An introduction to the causes of reoffending.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

This module will provide the students with:

 

  • The ability to discuss what constitutes a crime (historical and cultural differences), the prevalence of criminal behavior and trends in criminal behaviour
  • An awareness of physiological and psychological causes of criminal behaviour
  • An ability to critically evaluate Sociological theories of crime
  • The ability to critically examine causes of reoffending.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 80% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 20% Group Presentation

CRIME AND MEDIA

MODULE TITLE : CRIME AND MEDIA

MODULE CODE : SS503F


MODULE SUMMARY :

By the end of this module students will be familiar with the relationship between crime and the media. They will be able to demonstrate how official statistics on crime relate to the patterns of crime represented within the media. They will also be able to discuss social action approaches to the nature of crime and deviance and its relationship to the media.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Explore the relationship between the nature of criminality and the mass media
  • Exploration of the notion and relationship between ethnicity, gender and locality
  • Discussion of social action approaches to the nature of crime and deviance and its relationship to the media
  • An introduction to official statistics on crime and its relationship to the patterns of crime represented within the media.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students should be able to:

 

  • Understand the relationship between the nature of criminality and the mass media.
  • Explore the notions and relationships between ethnicity, gender and locality
  • Critically explore social action approaches to the nature of crime and deviance and its relationship to the media
  • Critically examine the official statistics on crime and its relationship to the patterns of crime represented within the media.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 20% Short Answer Questions (400 words)

Component 2 - 80% Examination (2 hours)

Year 3 modules


INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH PROJECT

INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH PROJECT: details currently unavailable

WORK PLACEMENT

MODULE TITLE : WORK PLACEMENT

MODULE CODE : PLU502


MODULE SUMMARY :

This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 10.00
Independent : 90.00
Placement : 100.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement in a workplace setting.

  • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement and of their independent learning throughout the experience.

  • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.

  • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.

  • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to: 

  1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.

  2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.

  3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.

  4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - % PLACEMENT REGISTRATION FORM

Component 2 - 60% WORK PLACEMENT REFLECTION (2500 WORDS)

Component 3 - 40% WORK PLACEMENT EVALUATION: DIGITAL RESOURCE (1500 WORDS EQUIVALENT)

THE INDIVIDUAL, SOCIETY AND MORALITY

The Individual, Society and Morality: details currently unavailable

ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

Module Title: Abnormal Psychology

Module Code: SS507F
Module Summary:
By the end of this module students will be familiar with the concepts of normality and abnormality and with the physiological and psychological approaches to explaining anxiety disorders and eating disorders. Students will be able to evaluate the explanations in terms of strengths and weaknesses drawing on the effectiveness of treatments. Students will also be able to draw on research support to offer insight in to the validity, reliability, cultural and ethical considerations of diagnosis.

CATS Value: 20
ECTS Value: 10
Contact Hours:
Scheduled: 36 (Lectures: 30; Workshops: 4; Tutorials: 2) Independent: 164 (Directed: 64; Self-Directed: 100) Placement: 0 Total: 200

Programmes for which this Module is Mandatory: Foundation Degree Social Sciences
Programmes where this Module may be taken as an Option: None
Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
The module aims to:
• Examine the concepts of normality and abnormality including evaluation of the definitions of abnormal
• Explore physiological causes (e.g. genetics, the brain, hormones and neurotransmitters) and psychological causes (e.g. behaviourist, cognitive, social and Psychodynamic) of anxiety disorders e.g. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and Obsessive Compulsive disorder
• Discuss physiological causes (e.g. genetics, the brain, hormones and neurotransmitters) and psychological causes (e.g. behaviourist, cognitive, social and Psychodynamic) of eating disorders e.g. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa
• Debate the validity, reliability, cultural and ethical considerations of diagnosis

Learning Opportunities:
This module will provide the students with:
• The ability to discuss the concepts of normality and abnormality including evaluation of the definitions
• The ability to critically examine physiological and psychological cause of anxiety disorders •
• The ability to critically examine physiological and psychological cause of eating disorders
• The ability to explore the validity, reliability, cultural and ethical considerations of diagnosis

Assessment:
Component 1: 80% Essay (2000 words)
An essay completed in non-timed conditions will enable learners to demonstrate an application of knowledge to a given essay title.
Component 2: 20% Group presentation (15 minutes) (1500 word equivalent) A group is usually 2 – 4 students
A small group presentation will be undertaken during the module and observation recording forms will be completed by the observer to record assessment performance. Students will be assessed as a group.

Course code


L789 

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Applications for part-time courses are made via Newman

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