History and Education BA (Hons)

Course length: 3 years full-time

Overview

Why study History and Education?

History and Education is an excellent combination for those with a wider interest in culture, politics and social change. It will involve a broad range of historical and educational approaches and methods, yet will be organised in a way that allows you to develop your understanding in a manageable fashion. Assessments are designed to encourage you to explore the two disciplines together and we will support you as you come to appreciate the significance of both subjects.

What does the course cover?

The History component of the course is distinctive for giving you the opportunity to explore a particularly wide range of periods, themes and approaches to the study of history. Whatever  your interests - political, cultural, intellectual, social, economic, or international - you will study modules that will fire your imagination and open employment opportunities. You will study a range of modules focusing on Ancient, Medieval and Modern  History. In your second year you start building your degree to suit your interests and strengths, beginning to take modules which focus on your preferred aspects of history. In your third year you will be able to tailor your degree by choosing modules on the historical topics that interest you most. The Education component of the course is studied from the perspective of the individual learner, within systems of formal education and informal contexts. The course is designed to give you a ‘rounded’ understanding of education through an interdisciplinary study of the philosophy, psychology and sociology of education. You will have the opportunity to consider education and equality, special educational needs, creativity in education and the impact of new technologies on education.

How will I be assessed?

We pride ourselves on giving good academic and individual support to each of our students. We will provide the support you need to lead you through the potentially baffling worlds of the past. We know that students need more than just lectures, so you will have the support of seminars, tutorials, group activities, study skills and fieldwork (including the option to work abroad). Modules are assessed through coursework, reports, presentations, analysis tasks, reflective logs, and research papers or examinations. Members of the department are always happy to give individual tutorials and advice on research and writing assignments.

What makes the course noteworthy?

- History has been taught at Newman for over 35 years. During this time, Newman has developed an outstanding collection of resources, including its own local history archive. Our tutors are recognised as experts in their field, who publish frequently, and student feedback comments on how helpful staff are when discussing individual projects.

- The course provides you with the necessary subject knowledge to teach History at either primary or secondary level, and covers all the main areas on the History syllabus at Key Stages 2 and 3 and for many popular GCSE and A Level options.

- As well as gaining relevant subject knowledge you will have the chance to study abroad and undertake international placements which will provide you with valuable and exciting experience within an area you may be considering for a career.

What careers can I consider?

A wide range of opportunities are open to you as a graduate of History and Education Studies in addition to primary or secondary teaching. A broad range of careers is available including heritage, museum, tourism and library work. Professions and management roles requiring the skills to understand, motivate and communicate with people are also good career paths.


Newman University would like to draw your attention to our Academic Regulations. These regulations are your Terms of Reference and should be considered when making a decision to study with our institution.

Entry requirements

September 2018 Entry Requirements

You must achieve either at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma), or a total of 88 points from a maximum of 3 A levels.

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9 M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

5 GCSEs at grade C or above including English or a recognised equivalent, are also required.

If your Work Placement module in Year 2 involves working with children or vulnerable adults, you may be required to obtain a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance.

Fees

Fees per academic year: 2017/18 

Full-time UK/EU Students: £9,250*

Please note for 2018/19 the University reserves the right to increase fees broadly in line with increases in inflation, or to reflect changes in government funding policies or changes agreed by Parliament.

Finance and Scholarship information

Additional costs:

A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is not required for entry into this programme, although it is in many cases required by employers before students can begin their Year 2 (level 5) work placement.  The cost of the DBS is currently £55 (including processing fee) with the option of subscribing to the update service which is currently £13 per year.  For more information on your DBS application please click here.

As a full time student, you will study a total of 120 credits each year. Credits are made up of mandatory modules and you may have a list of optional modules to choose from. Not every programme offers optional modules and when an optional module is available it will be clearly marked. All modules are listed below and you may not be required to complete all of these modules. Most modules are 20 credits and dissertations are 40 credits. Please note that not all optional modules run every year. For further information please email admissions@newman.ac.uk.

Year 1 modules


INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION STUDIES: EDUCATION AND SOCIETY


INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION STUDIES: EDUCATION AND SOCIETY: details currently unavailable

DOING THEORY ON EDUCATION: DEVELOPING A CRITICAL APPROACH


DOING THEORY ON EDUCATION: DEVELOPING A CRITICAL APPROACH: details currently unavailable

INTRODUCTION TO LEARNING AND TEACHING


INTRODUCTION TO LEARNING AND TEACHING: details currently unavailable

AN INTRODUCTION TO HISTORY AT UNIVERSITY


MODULE TITLE : AN INTRODUCTION TO HISTORY AT UNIVERSITY

MODULE CODE : HSU401


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module initially acts as a practical introduction and how-to survival guide for ‘apprentice historians’ and undergraduate students on a history degree course.  It equips them with tools and techniques used by historians and allows time to practice them. It also introduces students to the analysis of primary sources, to the world of professional history and to some of the theoretical approaches to the subject that have developed over the past two thousand years.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 48.00
Independent : 152.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Equip students with the tools and techniques to practise history
  • Be explicit about the behaviours and competences expected of students on a university-level academic history course.
  • Explore the use of primary sources in the study of history
  • Introduce students to the theoretical underpinnings of academic history and the world of professional history.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and other source material with a secure understanding of the relevant context and of established techniques of historical enquiry
  • Understand and critically evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the past
  • Construct historical arguments in a variety of written forms
  • Gather and retrieve written and other materials for use in study from library, electronic and other repositories
  • Critically interpret historical evidence - contemporary texts and other primary sources, secondary evidence, including the work of historians.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 60% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 40% Timed Essay (1 hour)

INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING


INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING: details currently unavailable

MODERN BRITAIN SINCE 1918-2010 - optional module


MODULE TITLE : MODERN BRITAIN SINCE 1918

MODULE CODE : HSU405


MODULE SUMMARY :

The lectures serve as a broad introduction to the history of Britain since 1918 in three distinct areas: politics, society and economics. The module enables them to study a period of established orthodoxies and resonance with contemporary political issues and to study the documentary and film evidence on which historians have made their judgements and in this way become aware of the processes involved in producing a historical interpretation.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Enable students to understand the political, social and economic history of Britain from 1918 up to the present day
  • Identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and other source material (including documentary and film evidence) on which historians have made their judgements
  • Understand and critically evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the recent past.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Appreciate the inter-relationship between three historical methods: political, social and economic, through study of the  
  • Analyse a period of established orthodoxies, newly opening discourses and resonance with  contemporary political issues
  • Study the documentary and film evidence on which historians have made their judgements and in this way become aware of the processes involved in producing a historical interpretation.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (1 hour)

THE RISE OF MODERN AMERICA - optional module


MODULE TITLE : THE RISE OF MODERN AMERICA

MODULE CODE : HSU408


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will survey the modern domestic history of the United States, introducing students to the key events, issues and themes in order to provide framework for further study in United States history.  Although organised chronologically, the module will identify and elaborate on a number of linking themes in late nineteenth and twentieth century United States history.  These will include the tension between the United States’ rural life and values and its urban destiny; the position of women and ethnic minorities in the United States; and the role of ideology in American life and politics. The module enables students to engage with key historiographical debates in the development of modern America as well as primary source material.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:                                                     

  • Familiarise students with the key events in modern American domestic history
  • Enable students to identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and primary source material
  • Enable students to understand and evaluate the complex and shifting historiography of modern American history and encourage them to forward their own interpretations.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Relate and explain the key events in modern American domestic history
  • Identify the major historical problems arising from this history
  • Apply and engage with the relevant historiography
  • Engage with a range of primary sources
  • Appraise the historical development of the United States over the course of the late nineteenth and twentieth century
  • Demonstrate improved writing, oral presentation and small group work skills.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (1 hour)

INTRODUCTION TO ANCIENT HISTORY - optional module


INTRODUCTION TO ANCIENT HISTORY: details currently unavailable

TUDOR BRITAIN - optional module


TUDOR BRITAIN: details currently unavailable

Year 2 modules


WORK PLACEMENT


MODULE TITLE : WORK PLACEMENT

MODULE CODE : PLU502


MODULE SUMMARY :

This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 10.00
Independent : 90.00
Placement : 100.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement in a workplace setting.

  • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement and of their independent learning throughout the experience.

  • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.

  • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.

  • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to: 

  1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.

  2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.

  3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.

  4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - % PLACEMENT REGISTRATION FORM

Component 2 - 60% WORK PLACEMENT REFLECTION (2500 WORDS)

Component 3 - 40% WORK PLACEMENT EVALUATION: DIGITAL RESOURCE (1500 WORDS EQUIVALENT)

THEORY AND METHODS IN HISTORY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : THEORY AND METHOD IN HISTORY

MODULE CODE : HSU500


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module explores some of key developments in the scholarship of history as an academic discipline by surveying a variety of approaches used in constructing and interpreting the past. It will focus on what the historian can claim to know, the post-modernist challenge, and seek to engage students in methodological debates. 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Explore a variety of contemporary approaches to constructing and interpreting the past (e.g. Marxist, feminist, cultural, post-modernist).
  • Offer valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:  

  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data.
  • Communicate clearly, coherently and with structure in writing.
  • Communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in speech appropriate to the audience.
  • Use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for history.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Group Poster Presentation (20 minutes)

SCHOLARSHIP AND METHOD IN HISTORY - optional module


SCHOLARSHIP AND METHOD IN HISTORY: details currently unavailable

CRITICAL ENQUIRIES: EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND PRACTICE - optional module


CRITICAL ENQUIRIES: EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND PRACTICE: details currently unavailable

CRITICAL ENQUIRIES: EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY - optional module


CRITICAL ENQUIRIES: EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY: details currently unavailable

DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

MODULE CODE : ESU503


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module introduces students to and expands their knowledge of key theories and concepts within developmental, child and educational psychology. Utilising a bio-psycho-social stance, the module emphasizes normative perspectives on human growth and learning, with a predominant focus on that of children and young people. Against this foundation, consideration will be given to ways in which development and learning may be inhibited, derailed, varied and promoted by family, social and cultural influences as well as practitioner interventions. Emphasis is placed on interdisciplinary perspectives that contribute to critically understanding both these processes and the contested nature of the subject. The module aims to offer possibilities to link theory, research and practice with insights drawn from students’ own lived experience, thus fostering deeper integrative learning opportunities. Particular focus will be placed upon explaining ideas, themes and contemporary issues that inform critical study within this area, which, in turn, will serve to provide a platform for progressive study across all levels of the award.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Introduce selected key theories and concepts within developmental, child and educational psychology
  • Emphasise normative perspectives on human growth and learning, with a predominant focus on that of children and young people
  • Consider ways in which development and learning may be inhibited and promoted by a range of influences
  • Consolidate students understanding of these concepts and processes with teaching examples, readings, and personal reflection
  • Establish foundational academic knowledge for both the specific topic area and broader interdisciplinary collaboration
  • Support students in developing new perspectives and understanding of their own developmental and learning formation and that of others
  • Consider the role of values and ethics on policy and practice
  • Develop students as active learners and researchers

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate an understanding of core academic and professional concepts both within developmental, child and educational psychology and in relation to other disciplinary domains
  • Critically reflect on normative perspectives on growth and learning, particularly among children and young people, and approaches to influencing these processes
  • Consider the ways in which professional practices in these areas have developed through a matrix of socio-political, economic, scientific, academic and individual drivers
  • Consider practitioner decision making and judgement within these areas in the light of wider societal value systems      
  • Question – using theory and data – dominant approaches to professional practices
  • Reflect on their own values and on-going formative experience in light of contested concepts and ideas
  • Develop their own research, critical analysis and writing skills

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Structured Literature Review (3000 words)

EDUCATION SYSTEMS AND SOCIAL CHANGE - optional module


EDUCATION SYSTEMS AND SOCIAL CHANGE: details currently unavailable

DIGITAL CHILDHOODS - optional module


MODULE TITLE : DIGITAL CHILDHOODS

MODULE CODE : ESU508


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module considers the increasing role that digital media is playing in young people’s lives, and the implications of this for their development, education and well-being. Drawing on research, policy and contemporary thinking, students will explore both empowerment and protectionist discourses, as well as young people’s uses of and attitudes to technology. The module will consider e-safety issues and conditions for promoting digital literacy.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Outline contemporary debates around young peoples’ use of technology;
  • Explore the role of technology in society and related issues;
  • Enable students to understand the personal, social and educational implications of digital media use;
  • Help students consider issues of online behaviour and associated structure and agency;
  • Consider the ways in which digital literacies are promoted in schools;
  • Help students consider the ways that e-safety policies are implemented in different settings;
  • Promote students’ understanding of their own use of technology through discussion, debate and evaluation.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary thinking and practice around young people’s use of technology;         
  • Recognise that young people’s use of digital media are subject to a range of interpretations and competing agendas;
  • Consider ways in which young people’s use of digital media can be evaluated and understood;
  • Critically evaluate competing (and evolving) digital media policies;
  • Negotiate the selection of material for a public presentation;
  • Identify, select and synthesise appropriate literature, research data and materials for presentation;
  • Structure ideas and outcomes for an oral presentation.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Paired Presentation (20 minutes)

CREATIVE LEARNING - optional module


CREATIVE LEARNING: details currently unavailable

EDUCATIONAL POSSIBILITIES - optional module


EDUCATIONAL POSSIBILITIES: details currently unavailable

19TH CENTURY EUROPE: POLITICS, GENDER AND SOCIETY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : 19TH CENTURY EUROPE: POLITICS, GENDER AND SOCIETY

MODULE CODE : HSU503


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module approaches the history of Europe in the 19th century comparatively, examining key transformations in politics, economics and social formation in France, Germany and Italy.  It also explores the changes in gender relations and women’s experience of, participation in and contribution to European history during this century.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to develop: 

  • A command of the history of key social, economic, political and gender shifts in nineteenth century Europe.
  • A command of the history of internal developments in France, Germany and Italy.
  • An introduction to key concepts and milestones in the history of European women during the nineteenth century.
  • An understanding of, and the ability to evaluate, a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of the social, economic, political and gender history of Nineteenth Century Europe.
  • The ability to offer valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation
  • The ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data.
  • The ability to work as part of a team, dividing tasks
  • The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in speech appropriate to the audience
  • The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in writing
  • The ability to use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for history.
  • The ability to manipulate and interpret a range of numerical data.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Command the history of key social, economic and political developments in Nineteenth Century Europe, including key internal developments and contribution of women in France, Germany and Italy.
  • Understand and evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of the social, economic, political and gender history of Nineteenth Century Europe.
  • Offer valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation
  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data.
  • Communicate clearly, coherently and with structure in writing.
  • Communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in speech appropriate to the audience.
  • Use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for history.
  • Manipulate and interpret a range of numerical data.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Book Review (1000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Examination (2 hours)

GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD - optional module


MODULE TITLE : GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

MODULE CODE : HSU505


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will introduce students to the study of gender, sexuality and women’s history in the ancient world. Students will examine theoretical approaches to gender studies and explore concepts of gender and aspects of women’s history in ancient Greece and Rome.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Develop students’ understanding of the women’s history and gender studies in the ancient world
  • Foster an understanding of key theoretical concepts in gender studies and women’s history
  • Promote students’ ability to identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and source material, using it in a critical and imaginative way, with a broad appreciation of its context in women’s history and gender studies in ancient history.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

  • Display a strong understanding of the women’s history and gender studies in the ancient world
  • Identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and source material, using it in a critical and imaginative way, with a broad appreciation of its context in women’s history and gender studies in the ancient world
  • Understand and evaluate a variety of current historical approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of women’s history and gender studies in ancient history
  • Offer some valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation
  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, including a range of ancient primary sources as well as secondary sources.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Source Analysis (1500 words)

Component 2 - 60% Essay (3000 words)

POWER AND IDENTITY IN LATE MEDIEVAL ENGLAND, 1170-1485 - optional module


MODULE TITLE : POWER AND IDENTITY IN LATE MEDIEVAL ENGLAND, 1170-1485

MODULE CODE : HSU510


MODULE SUMMARY :

This is a research-led module which expands on the structure of a traditional survey course focusing on the later middle ages. By focusing on two of the most important themes of recent medieval historiography – power and identity – this module effectively combines substantial chronological content with close documentary study of primary sources. This module is taught by weekly lectures which focus alternately on the connected themes of power and identity combining topics such as the contest between religious and secular power and the nature and expression of English Catholicism. Other central topics include royal power and gender identity; peasant power and the development of the English language; the power of the nobility and the development of a legal society; conflict and conquest and the English landscape. These lectures are supplemented with student-led seminar discussions and primary source workshops. In addition to this there will be two practical skills workshops for essay and exam preparation. This module offers a strong foundation for modules in year 3, notably HSU601 and any future medieval options. It also has strong historiographical links with the early modern modules HSU504 and HSU605.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 33.00
Independent : 167.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Develop a critical understanding of late medieval England from the death of Becket to the emergence of the Tudor dynasty.

  • Enable students to understand and critically evaluate recent historiographical trends in medieval study based on a cultural reading of the past.

  • Identify, analyse and evaluate primary source material including documentary and literary sources, historical narratives, letters and theological tracts alongside archaeological and material evidence.

  • Understand the theoretical concepts of power and national identity and how the medieval past has been used (and misused) in the debates of the present.

     

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Understand the complexity and variety of the later middle ages.

  • Challenge common historical stereotypes which are founded on a negative reading of the past. 

  • Engage with a range of primary sources.

  • Develop independent research skills.

  • Produce a formal written essay and improve writing skills.

  • Develop notetaking and revision techniques for exam preparation.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

THE BRITISH CIVIL WARS - optional module


THE BRITISH CIVIL WARS: details currently unavailable

THE ENGLISH CATHEDRAL (RELIGION AND SOCIETY) - optional module


THE ENGLISH CATHEDRAL (RELIGION AND SOCIETY): details currently unavailable

THE MAKING OF THE MODERN WORLD 1945 - 2001 - optional module


THE MAKING OF THE MODERN WORLD 1945 - 2001: details currently unavailable

Year 3 modules


EDUCATION DISSERTATION - optional module


EDUCATION DISSERTATION: details currently unavailable

HISTORY DISSERTATION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : DISSERTATION

MODULE CODE : HSU601


MODULE SUMMARY :

This double module is a tutored project in which the student conceives, plans, researches and executes a lengthy piece of historical writing on a self-chosen theme or topic, involving mainly secondary but including some primary evidence.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to develop: 

  • A command of a body of historical knowledge, defined by their chosen topic
  • The ability to identify, analyse and critically evaluate historical texts and other source material with a secure understanding of the relevant context and of established techniques of historical enquiry
  • An understanding of, and the ability to critically to evaluate, a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the past
  • The ability to offer apt and convincing solutions to historical problems (some of which will be based on current research), using an appropriate range of historical evidence, and which recognise the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation
  • The ability to successfully gather, sort and synthesise a large amount of historical data
  • The ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data, if appropriate
  • The ability to plan and execute complex tasks within a given time-frame
  • The ability to work autonomously, setting goals and deadlines as appropriate in order to complete set tasks
  • The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, fluently and with structure in writing employing the standard referencing techniques of the discipline
  • The ability to use a variety of information technologies proficiently and appropriately, including word-processing, electronic information catalogues and the internet.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Command a body of historical knowledge, defined by their chosen topic.
  • Identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and other source material with a secure understanding of the relevant context and of established techniques of historical enquiry.
  • Understand and critically evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the past.
  • Offer apt and convincing solutions to historical problems (some of which will be based on current research), using an appropriate range of historical evidence, and which recognise the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation.
  • Successfully gather, sort and synthesise a large amount of historical data.
  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data, if appropriate.
  • Plan and execute complex tasks within a given time-frame.
  • Work autonomously, setting goals and deadlines as appropriate in order to complete set tasks.
  • Communicate clearly, fluently, coherently and with structure in writing appropriate to the audience, and employ the standard referencing techniques of the discipline.
  • Use a variety of information technologies proficiently and appropriately (word-processing, electronic information catalogues, e-mail and the internet).

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 10% Dissertation Literature Review (2000 words)

Component 2 - 90% Dissertation (10000 words)

NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT - optional module


MODULE TITLE : NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT

MODULE CODE : PLU601


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module offers students the opportunity to build on their level 5 work placement through the more developed application of a negotiated work-based research project. Students will agree with their placement tutor and workplace mentor a brief for a project which addresses a need within the organisation. Learners should complete a minimum of 100 hours in the work place. It is in the spirit of this module that wherever possible, the focus will be on social or community / sustainable development.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 276.00
Placement : 100.00
Total :  400.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Enable students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing a negotiated work-based research project

  • Encourage students to use appropriate work-based research methods

  • Enable students to work collaboratively in a work setting, establishing continuity from their previous work placement and offering tangible evidence of building on this prior experience, where possible

  • Generate confidence and security in students’ employability on graduation

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Secure, negotiate and design a work-based research project

  • Develop an understanding of, and apply, research methods that are appropriate to work-based contexts

  • Interpret gathered information

  • Make a clear and productive contribution to the organization through the development of recommendations arising from the work-based research project

  • Present a creatively engaging argument

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT (8000 WORDS)

EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY - optional module


EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY: details currently unavailable

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

MODULE CODE : ESU608


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module focuses specifically on the interconnectivity and interdependence of international and comparative aspects of education by exploring a range of analytical models drawn from sociological and political contexts. The module begins with an exploration of global historical contexts to consider how these relate to current worldwide controversies and challenges in educational policy and practice.  The module  will go on to invite students to explore a range perspectives to engage with themes including globalisation, educational transfer processes across nations, definitions of global ‘consumer’ and global ‘citizen’ and to consider how studies of pupil attainment contribute to global discussions about the future of education.  Students will explore differences & similarities in learning and teaching by comparing & contrasting aspects of the educational context in two different countries.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:  

  • Enable students to appreciate a multidisciplinary approach to the study of international & comparative education using a range of perspectives, including historical, cultural, sociological, economic and political models.
  • Critically review the concept of international and comparative study of education and consider international paradigms of educational ‘effectiveness’ and ‘improvement’ using a range of literature.
  • Understand the nature of the challenges that are currently being faced by the study of comparative and international education and how this contributes to the future of learning, teaching, research and professional development.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:
 

  • Critically reflect upon contemporary challenges and controversies in international education and understand how these relate to historical, sociological and political contexts. 
  • Discuss and share critically informed perspectives on differences between international and comparative aspects of education.
  • Identify key topics of personal interest in relation to international perspectives on educational policy and practice.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how international and comparative perspectives contribute to discussion on global educational aims and purposes.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Comparative Report (4000 words)

POLITICS OF EDUCATION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : POLITICS OF EDUCATION

MODULE CODE : ESU607


MODULE SUMMARY :

The module builds upon the understanding of sociological approaches to educational analysis introduced and developed at Level 4 and Level 5. It is designed to build on a range of knowledge, understanding and skills, in order to facilitate further understanding of the inter-relationships between education and political ideologies - within macro, meso and micro contexts. The overall purpose of the module is to enable students to question and analyse ‘common sense’ assumptions of policy and practice by investigating current and historical political issues and policy themes that, in turn, relate to their own interests and identities.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

The aims of this module are to:

  • Develop further understanding of the sociological and political analysis of educational policy and practice.
  • Analyse the factors that shape the making of policy at institutional levels using themes and questions of your choice.
  • Review the complex inter-relationships between these macro, meso and micro forms of education and politics.
  • Evaluate both the conventions and different forms of documentary and how they have been produced to interpret political issues and present a variety of critical perspectives on them.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

  • Evaluate current educational policy developments and how these impact upon educational practices.
  • Analyse the connections between broader political discourses and the ‘shaping’ of educational policy and practice.
  • Apply an analysis framework to how different policy initiatives in education are influenced by their ideological contexts.
  • Identify an appropriate area of education for exploration using an enquiry based approach.
  • Develop their capacity for critical reflection and questioning.
  • Engage an audience through the conventions of a documentary produced to explain a political issue and present a critical perspective on it.
  • Collaborate effectively with others in the production of a group documentary.
  • Manage their learning, work collaboratively in undertaking a small scale investigation and develop an appropriate strategy for a documentary production.
  • Make use of basic audio visual equipment (cameras, editing software) to produce a documentary.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Analysis (2000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Group Documentary (12 to 15 minutes)

EDUCATION, TECHNOLOGY AND CHANGE - optional module


EDUCATION, TECHNOLOGY AND CHANGE: details currently unavailable

CRITICAL THEORY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : CRITICAL THEORY

MODULE CODE : ESU604


MODULE SUMMARY :

This honours level module explores a range of critical theory and its potential applications to the field of Education Studies.  Each contribution is examined in relation to its philosophical and epistemological ‘moves’ and students are encouraged to develop critical responses to such theory in terms of its relevance to specific areas of psychology, sociology and learning theory. The module will cover a range of theoretical contributions in the order of their publication, and students will consider the relationship between each approach. A specific example of critical theory will be selected for application in dialogue with a particular area of Education Studies encountered in the degree.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:
 

  • Explore and apply critical perspectives on the philosophy and sociology of education drawn from such approaches as Marxism, Psychoanalysis, Post-structuralism, Feminism and Post-modernism. 
  • Equip students with the ability to apply critical theory to specific aspects of education.  
  • Develop a critical perspective in response to key theoretical contributions. 
  • Facilitate the independent development of new theoretical perspectives to aid progression to study for a higher degree.  

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Describe a range of critical theory approaches in relation to Education Studies.
  • Compare and comment on relationships between different critical theory approaches.
  • Understand the philosophical differences between critical theories and other approaches to society, identity, learning and texts. 
  • Apply critical theory to the study of education.
  • Reflect personally on their own construction in discourses about education. 
  • Critique, from an informed vantage point, theoretical language games.
  • Create new ways of thinking about education arising from their analysis of the dialectical nature of educational philosophy.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 20% Abstract for a conference paper and 10 - 15 minute presentation

Component 2 - 80% 3500 word paper following the presentation of the draft paper and feedback

ACCESS AND INCLUSION - optional module


ACCESS AND INCLUSION: details currently unavailable

FRENCH REVOLUTION AND NAPOLEON - optional module


MODULE TITLE : FRENCH REVOLUTION AND NAPOLEON

MODULE CODE : HSU603


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module examines a formative event in Europe's history and one with ramifications for the modern world: the French Revolution and its Napoleonic aftermath.  Students will be asked to form a view on the complex debates about the origins and impact of the Revolution and Napoleonic Empire and will engage with evidence in the form of translated primary sources.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop a critical understanding of the history of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods in French history, within a European context
  • The ability to identify, analyse and critically evaluate historical texts and other primary data (in translated form) relating to the French Revolution and Napoleonic periods with a secure understanding of the relevant context and of established techniques of historical enquiry
  • An understanding of, and the ability to critically evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods
  • The ability successfully to gather, sort and synthesise historical data on a range of themes within the period of study
  • The ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data
  • The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, fluently and with structure in writing, and employ the standard referencing techniques of the discipline
  • The ability to use a variety of information technologies proficiently and appropriately including word-processing, electronic information catalogues and the Intranet.
  • The ability to manipulate and interpret a range of complex numerical data.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Command the history of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods in French history, within a European context
  • Identify, analyse and critically evaluate historical texts and other primary data (in translated form) relating to the French Revolution and Napoleonic periods with a secure understanding of the relevant context and of established techniques of historical enquiry
  • Understand and critically evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods
  • Successfully to gather, sort and synthesise historical data on a range of themes within the period of study
  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data
  • Communicate clearly, coherently fluently and with structure in writing and employ the standard referencing techniques of the discipline
  • Use a variety of information technologies proficiently and appropriately including word-processing, electronic information catalogues and the Intranet.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (3500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (3 hours)

VICTORIAN BRITAIN - optional module


MODULE TITLE : VICTORIAN BRITAIN

MODULE CODE : HSU604


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will involve students in engagement with one of the most contentious and complex periods in Britain’s history, focusing on the issues and debates in the social and political history of the period. They will gain familiarity with this key period in the development of modern Britain and be able to set this in its wider context.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Secure a command of aspects of life and events in Victorian Britain including social, political and economic features
  • Critical analysis various approaches to constructing and interpreting the Victorian period
  • Offer solutions to key historical problems in the Victorian periods, using a range of historical evidence, both visual and documentary
  • Appreciate and assemble coherent arguments in essay and examination form based on valid historical evidence and informed by the judgements of historians

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  1. Understand, and critically evaluate different approaches to constructing and            interpreting the Victorian era, the importance of events, the pace and complexity of change and continuity.

  2. Construct coherent arguments using a range of evidence, largely from historians,    but including some primary historical evidence

  3. Experience a variety of learning environments: including archival and fieldwork,      group work, presentation and source analysis

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (3500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (3 hours)

PROTEST, PIETY AND THE PARISH: BRITAIN AND IRELAND C 1600-1660 - optional module


MODULE TITLE : PROTEST, PIETY AND THE PARISH: BRITAIN AND IRELAND C 1600-1660

MODULE CODE : HSU605


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module provides an insight into the day-to-day lives of men and women in seventeenth-century Britain and Ireland. Building on students’ study of Tudor history and/or the British Civil Wars, the module develops student understanding of social and cultural history in the early modern period. Students will examine different aspects of the lifecycle in the early modern parish - from birth in the first week to death and post-mortem rituals in the final session.

 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop students’ understanding of early modern British social history
  • Foster an understanding of key theoretical concepts in the study of social and cultural history
  • Promote students’ ability to identify, analyse and evaluate both primary texts and secondary literature on the subject of social and cultural history

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

 Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Construct coherent, convincing and sustained arguments using an appropriately wide range of primary and secondary literature
  • Display a strong understanding of early modern Britain and theoretical approaches to the study of social and cultural history
  • Identify, analyse and evaluate primary texts and secondary literature on social and cultural history, using it in a critical and imaginative way, with a broad appreciation of context
  • Understand and evaluate a variety of current approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of social and cultural history in the early modern British context

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (3500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (3 hours)

PERSONALITY AND DISORDER IN 12TH CENTURY ENGLAND - optional module


MODULE TITLE : PERSONALITY AND DISORDER IN 12TH CENTURY ENGLAND

MODULE CODE : HSU611


MODULE SUMMARY :

This is a research-led module which focuses on twelfth-century England, particularly the years 1135-1154. The period known as the Anarchy was a civil war which was noted by contemporaries for its violence and lawlessness. This was, and continues to be, blamed on the personalities of two rival claimants to the English throne: Matilda and Stephen. By focusing on the Anarchy in England students will also be introduced to two grand narratives of European historiography, notably the formation of the individual during the twelfth-century renaissance and the breakdown of public order which characterised the post-Carolingian period. 

 

This conceptual module will challenge Level 6 students with theoretical issues including how far historians should consider personality when assessing causation and change. It will also allow students to engage with current research into the concept of power and authority in the high middle ages.

 

This module is taught by weekly classes and student-led seminar discussions. This will be supplemented by weekly primary source workshops as students engage with a range of material including chronicles, hagiographies, letters and archaeological material. In addition to this there will be two practical skills workshops for essay and exam preparation. This module is allows for a theoretical and reflective approach to studying history at Level 6. In this way it will supplement their research for HSU601.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Develop a critical understanding of the period of the Anarchy in England, 1135-54.

  • Enable students to understand and critically evaluate recent historiographical trends in medieval study based on a cultural reading of the past.

  • Enable students to identify, analyse and evaluate a range of primary source material.

  • Understand the theoretical concepts of personality, individuality and power and how they apply to the medieval past.

  • Encourage students to develop their own views of the value and meaning of historical interpretation.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Understand the complexity and variety of the high middle ages.
  • Relate and explain the key events of the Anarchy in England.
  • Apply and engage critically with the relevant historiography.
  • Critically engage with an extensive range of primary sources.
  • Develop independent research skills.
  • Produce a formal written essay and improve writing skills.
  • Develop notetaking and revision techniques for exam preparation.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% ESSAY (3000 WORDS)

Component 2 - 50% EXAMINATION

MYTH AND RELIGION IN THE ANCIENT WORLD - optional module


MYTH AND RELIGION IN THE ANCIENT WORLD: details currently unavailable

THE ENGLISH CATHEDRAL (ARCHITECTURE AND SOCIETY) - optional module


MODULE TITLE : THE ENGLISH CATHEDRAL (ARCHITECTURE AND SOCIETY)

MODULE CODE : HSU608


MODULE SUMMARY :

The module will be taught in an intensive field study mode, based on a series of visits to regional Cathedrals and Minsters where there will be an opportunity to study the religious culture of past societies at different sites. There will be a briefing session beforehand to introduce the aims of the module to the participants and to deal with practical issues. During the visit there will be lectures, workshops and guided visits to places of importance. Students will plan and carry out practical research related to their chosen topics and will give presentations and prepare final assessment tasks.

Students taking this module and HSU508 will attend the field visits together, but the preparation sessions will be differentiated as will the assessment tasks.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 50.00
Independent :
Placement :
Total :  50.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Develop students’ command of the history of English religious architecture over the past 7 centuries

  • Enable students to identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and other source material with a secure understanding of the relevant context and of established techniques of historical enquiry

  • Provide opportunities for students to successfully gather, sort and synthesise historical data in a field based setting

  • Demonstrate links between religious thought and practice and wider social, historical and artistic traditions in English culture

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Offer apt and convincing solutions to historical problems, based on current research, using an appropriate range of historical evidence
  • Demonstrate a secure understanding of a complex and specialised area of historical knowledge, which is contextualised successfully.
  • Communicate clearly, coherently, fluently and with structure in speech appropriate to the audience
  • Communicate clearly, coherently, fluently and with structure in writing, and employ the standard referencing techniques of the discipline
  • Use digital technologies proficiently and appropriately (word-processing, electronic information catalogues, etc.)

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Individual/Paired Oral Presentation (35 minutes)

Component 2 - 50% Essay (3500 words)

BLACK FREEDOM STRUGGLE - optional module


BLACK FREEDOM STRUGGLE: details currently unavailable

LEARNING JOURNEYS - optional module


MODULE TITLE : LEARNING JOURNEYS

MODULE CODE : ESU611


MODULE SUMMARY :

‘Learning journeys’ are conceptualised, within this module, in terms of meanings that learners attribute to their experiences of learning and how individual and collective experiences may be critically analysed and interpreted. The overall purpose of the module is to enable students to review their own learning careers by developing their analysis of these experiences by working individually and collectively during the module.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Outline concepts of ‘learning career’, ‘learning journey’, critical events and turning points and situate these within research on life history and autobiographical methods.

  • Explore how notions of aspiration raising, barriers and progression are described as a series of problems or events to be rationally overcome.

  • Enable students to develop their capacity to review their own learning careers and journeys and interpret the factors that may have shaped them.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 


 

  • Critically analyse their own experiences of current and/or prior learning and identify critical events or ‘turning points’ that relate to these experiences.

  • Critique notions of aspiration raising, barriers and transition and how these have been constructed in policy texts

  • Critically debate these contested notions in policy texts and compare them with concepts of ‘learning journey’ or ‘learning career’ in life history research

  • Review and synthesise how other examples of life history research relate to events or ‘turning points’ within their own learning careers

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

No information available.

Course code


VX13

Applications for full-time courses are made through UCAS.

 

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