English and Theology BA (Hons)

Course length: 3 years full-time 4.5 years part-time (for further information on part-time course combinations available click here)

Overview

Why study English and Theology?

English and Theology combines two fascinating subjects with a shared interest in the human individual and the search for meaning. Both subjects use a similar way of learning – through reading and discussion. Studying English and Theology in combination allows a richness of learning as each discipline informs the other in mutually enlightening ways.

Studying English will extend your insights into life and culture; it will develop your analytical and persuasive skills to a high degree. This course will teach you how to engage with a broad range of complex texts: novels, short stories, plays, films and poetry in literature. Through this work you will learn how to analyse text closely, engage with multiple interpretations of texts, and reflect on and critique those meanings.

Theology is of great importance for understanding the world in which we live and combines well with the study of English. The course will extend your understanding of religion and culture, and encourage you to think about deep questions such as how human beings should live and what values you want to promote in society. Almost every story covered in the media has an ethical, philosophical or religious dimension to it, so that theology is always relevant to the issues of today.

What does the course cover?

The English component of the course focuses on literature and modules are carefully chosen to link well with Theology. You will learn how to make meaning from the texts you read, and to use different critical theories to extend those meanings. You will engage with a range of literary texts which might include (depending on the options you take) Shakespeare’s plays, Romantic poetry, Victorian novels, children’s literature, short stories, world literature, and contemporary fiction. In addition, there will be the option to study film adaptation and the links between literature and film.

You will also have the opportunity to study all the key areas of the wide subject of theology, including: Christian theology, both classical and modern; philosophy of religion; ethical theories and issues; biblical interpretation; and how different religions interact with society. There are also optional modules in religious education available for those who are aiming for a future career in teaching.  Students from a range of backgrounds and prior learning experiences are welcome, and the course is open to those of any religious tradition or none.

The course incorporates employability throughout, helping you to keep your goals after graduation in view. As part of this you will have the opportunity to take a work placement as one of your modules, which will allow you to apply practically what you are learning in your university course. The work placement includes an opportunity to work abroad.

How will I be assessed?

Modules are assessed through a mixture of coursework, reports, presentations, analysis tasks, essays, commentaries, reflective logs, and research papers or examinations. We pride ourselves on giving good academic and individual support to each of our students. Alongside learning about the texts, contexts, theories, ideas and movements associated with the subject area, the course integrates opportunities for students to learn the skills associated with studying English and Theology: text analysis, effective essay writing, research, reflection and goal-setting.

What makes this course noteworthy?

The Theology and English departments at Newman have excellent reputations for the quality of their teaching and support of their students. Tutors are all well-qualified and experienced lecturers, and students are taught in relatively small groups, especially in the second and third year.

The friendliness and approachability of staff in both the English and Theology departments, as well as the quality of feedback and support offered, are frequently praised in student evaluations.  For example, in the 2013 National Student Survey, Theology at Newman was ranked 2nd in the UK for teaching and 9th for overall student satisfaction. In 2015 The English Department achieved an Overall Student Satisfaction rating of 100% in the NSS. The English Department has good links with local literary organisations including Writing West Midlands and the Birmingham Literature Festival. Students are encouraged to attend relevant readings and performances at the Literature Festival, as well as at a number of local theatres. Staff are actively involved in projects that seek to maximise students’ success at Newman and teach and support students in structured ways whilst developing the independence needed for graduate careers. The Theology course emphasises the ability to read and engage with primary texts, such as the scriptures and creeds of the world’s religions and the writings of philosophers and theologians. Field trips to places of worship and other sites of interest are organised annually.

All students at Newman undertake a work placement which helps equip them for employment after graduation. Students have the opportunity of going abroad to do the placement module.

What careers can I consider?

English and Theology is an excellent combination for a number of careers. The course helps to develop skills, such as critical thinking and sensitivity to cultural diversity, which are valued by a wide range of employers from local government and the civil service to human resources companies. Your communication skills and powers of analysis and interpretation mean that careers in marketing, copywriting, advertising, and teaching (primary or secondary), are all highly relevant careers. Management, or professions needing the skills to understand, motivate and communicate with people, are all good career paths. Some students will choose to continue their studies at a higher level by taking masters degrees and PhDs.


Newman University would like to draw your attention to our Academic Regulations. These regulations are your Terms of Reference and should be considered when making a decision to study with our institution.

Entry requirements

September 2018 Entry Requirements

You must achieve either at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma), or a total of 88 points from a maximum of 3 A levels.

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9 M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

5 GCSEs at grade C or above including English or a recognised equivalent, are also required.

Applicants may be called for interview.

Fees

Fees per academic year: 2017/18 

Full-time UK/EU Students: £9,250*

Part-time UK/EU Students: £4,950*

Please note for 2018/19 the University reserves the right to increase fees broadly in line with increases in inflation, or to reflect changes in government funding policies or changes agreed by Parliament.

Finance and Scholarship information

Additional information:

A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is not required for entry into this programme, although it is in many cases required by employers before students can begin their Year 2 (level 5) work placement.  The cost of the DBS is currently £55 (including processing fee) with the option of subscribing to the update service which is currently £13 per year.  For more information on your DBS application please click here.

ENU505 and ENU615 are both optional modules and if you choose to study either one of these modules you will be expected to attend events run as part of Birmingham Literature Festival (as well as other festivals and events).  Students will incur costs such as travel and possibly an entrance fee.  The programme will reimburse students up to a set amouth.  Based on the previous year the module ran, students were reimbursed up to £10.  Please note that not all optional modules run every year.

As a full time student, you will study a total of 120 credits each year. Credits are made up of mandatory modules and you may have a list of optional modules to choose from. Not every programme offers optional modules and when an optional module is available it will be clearly marked. All modules are listed below and you may not be required to complete all of these modules. Most modules are 20 credits and dissertations are 40 credits. Please note that not all optional modules run every year. For further information please email admissions@newman.ac.uk.

Year 1 modules


WAYS OF READING I


MODULE TITLE : WAYS OF READING I

MODULE CODE : ENU401


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module prepares students for university study and continues from induction week subject sessions. In terms of English subject content it covers, for prose: close reading, context and intertextuality, genre, figurative language, narrative structure, perspective, time, character, and, theoretically, structuralism; for poetry: close reading, poetic forms, rhyme, metre and scansion, figurative language. 

The following skills for studying English will also be taught in this module: transition from college to university study; using the range of university systems supporting learning (for example: Moodle, eBooks Dawsonera and Cambridge Companions Online, support services, library help desk, email) and understanding who to contact for particular support; understanding that interpretation of text is multiple and contextual (that there is no one right answer); essay writing skills including thesis statements, topic sentences, paragraph organisation, and building an effective argument; target setting from assessment feedback; finding accurate context for individual texts; using secondary sources to support argument. (NB this module does not cover the skills of independently finding secondary reading (see Reading Strategy below); this is covered in Introduction to Drama and Ways of Reading II.)

 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 42.00
Independent : 152.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  194.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module will allow for formative assessment through developing the essay component of assessment in sections; for formative feedback students will be required to upload elements by specific dates set throughout the module. The bibliographic element of the essay will be formatively peer-assessed within a seminar. 

This module aims to:

  • Introduce students to some texts from a range of genres and periods
  • Enable students to gain a basic knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts of the production of texts
  • Teach students the basis of narrative theory and poetic analysis, and how to apply these to make meanings from their close reading of texts
  • Develop, in students, an ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation
  • Teach students how to create work that is coherently structured
  • Develop students’ self-efficacy by explicitly discussing and practising ways to manage their time, plan and organise their workload to  meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Gain a introductory knowledge of a some texts from a range of genres and periods
  • Gain a basic knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts of the production of texts
  • Gain a basic knowledge and understanding of how prose and poetic texts work in narrative terms
  • Apply narrative theory and poetic analysis to make meanings from their close reading of texts
  • Develop a basic ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation
  • Demonstrate the ability to create work that is coherently structured
  • Begin to develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.          

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Examination (90 minutes)

Component 2 - 50% Portfolio (2000 words)

'MERELY PLAYERS'?: INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA


MODULE TITLE : 'MERELY PLAYERS'?: INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA

MODULE CODE : ENU405


MODULE SUMMARY :

Students will gain an overview of western drama tracing its development through different historical periods. Drama will be selected in a range of styles, moods and forms and from a range of historical eras which might include Renaissance, Restoration, Victorian, modern or contemporary. Students will learn about different genres such as comedy, history, tragedy, realist, absurdist as well as hybrid forms. They will also gain insights into different theories of drama. Students will develop skills in close reading of texts and gain insights into the structures, techniques, traditions, conventions of drama and gain confidence in their analysis of such features as characterization, plot development and staging. Students will also be trained in the use of electronic resources to develop their research skills.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Introduce students to a range of dramatic texts from different traditions and periods that feed into the western canon over a period of time and give them a sense of the influence which earlier drama has on later forms;

  • Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the distinctive character of drama, its literary forms and conventions, its structures, techniques, language, and modus operandi;

  • Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of a range of contexts from which the different dramatic traditions emerge and of the attitudes and expectations and purposes of drama held in different periods;

  • Enable students to develop the ability to write coherently and in a structured way about drama recognising, and commenting appropriately upon, key features of the types and genres of drama studied.

  • Develop students’ ability to use secondary critical resources in both digital and hard copy form to help them develop their understanding of drama;

  • To help students develop effective habits of independent study, taking responsibility for their own learning, through carefully structured and supported activities.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Gain an introductory knowledge of a range of dramatic texts of the western canon from a variety of periods, traditions and locations;

  • Gain a basic knowledge of the historical, cultural, political, economic, aesthetic and social contexts in which the plays were written.

  • Develop an introductory level of knowledge and understanding of theoretical approaches to drama and its purposes;

  • Gain an introductory knowledge of the distinctive, literary, linguistic, performative and visual characteristics of dramatic texts;

  • Develop their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation;

  • Gain some knowledge and understanding of generic conventions and the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts;

  • Demonstrate literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;

  • Develop their research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material;

  • Develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY (2000 WORDS)

Component 2 - 50% EXAMINATION (2 HOURS)

CHALLENGING THE CANON


CHALLENGING THE CANON: details currently unavailable

INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING


INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING: details currently unavailable

RESEARCH IN WORLD RELIGIONS


RESEARCH IN WORLD RELIGIONS: details currently unavailable

THEOLOGY: THE CLASSICAL TRADITION


MODULE TITLE : THEOLOGY: THE CLASSICAL TRADITION

MODULE CODE : THU404


MODULE SUMMARY :

Christian Theology explores big questions about what it means to be human and about the relationship between human beings and God. In this module we will engage with these questions as we study key theological thinkers from the first millennium of Christianity. In each teaching session we will encounter a new theologian and gain first-hand knowledge of the most important texts in the Christian tradition. 

As we study the writings of these theologians we will see how they state the big theological questions and how they try to answer them. By the end of the module we will understand why Christian theology has taken the shape it has. Each teaching session will help us develop the skills and knowledge necessary to engage with theological writings and the module concludes by asking the student to write a critical appraisal of the thinking of a great theologian on a major theme from the Christian theological tradition.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 33.00
Independent : 167.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop an understanding of various theologians in the classical tradition.
  • Foster an appreciation for how Christian theology has developed within a particular social and cultural context.
  • Encourage an awareness of the contribution of Classical theology to contemporary theology.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Describe and analyse the way that Classical Christian Theology was shaped by its social and cultural context
  • Outline and evaluate the development of Christian theology, focussing on a number of different case studies and recognising differences in doctrine, canon etc.
  • Read, discuss and compare primary and secondary material related to Classical Christian Theology, analysing their language and evaluating their utility in understanding the development of Christian Theology
  • Identify key ethical issues in the practice of theology and philosophy and develop theoretical understandings of theological practice that are applicable outside the classroom
  • Work together to debate and develop ideas about Christian Theology, communicating fluently in both written and oral form.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Reading of Seminar Text (1000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Essay (1500 words)

READING SACRED TEXTS: THE JEWISH AND CHRISTIAN BIBLE


READING SACRED TEXTS: THE JEWISH AND CHRISTIAN BIBLE: details currently unavailable

Year 2 modules


WORK PLACEMENT


MODULE TITLE : WORK PLACEMENT

MODULE CODE : PLU502


MODULE SUMMARY :

This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 10.00
Independent : 90.00
Placement : 100.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement in a workplace setting.

  • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement and of their independent learning throughout the experience.

  • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.

  • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.

  • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to: 

  1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.

  2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.

  3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.

  4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - % PLACEMENT REGISTRATION FORM

Component 2 - 60% WORK PLACEMENT REFLECTION (2500 WORDS)

Component 3 - 40% WORK PLACEMENT EVALUATION: DIGITAL RESOURCE (1500 WORDS EQUIVALENT)

OPEN TO INTERPRETATION: TWENTIETH-CENTURY THEORY, AND FICTION I - optional module


MODULE TITLE : OPEN TO INTERPRETATION: TWENTIETH-CENTURY THEORY, AND FICTION I

MODULE CODE : ENU500


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module introduces students to modern critical approaches to studying literature. Students will build on the skills demonstrated at Level 4 and extend the ways in which they can approach the critical analysis of literary texts. Students will go on to study ‘Open to Interpretation: Twentieth-Century Theory and Fiction II in semester two of level 5. Over the two modules, students will develop their knowledge of a number of critical approaches, such as: Formalism, New Criticism, Structuralism, Poststructuralism, Deconstruction, Marxism, Cultural Materialism, Feminism, Postfeminism, Postcolonialism, Psychoanalysis, Ecocriticism, and Postmodernism. Lecture sessions will include practical workshop tasks that will help students to analyse literary texts by way of these theories. The module will also include a reflective element and support the Personal Tutorial system established at Level 4.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop students’ awareness of modern critical approaches to studying literature
  • Extend students’ knowledge of the theoretical underpinnings, terminology and specific concepts relating to various critical approaches
  • Enable students to select and apply appropriate methods of criticism to literary texts
  • Develop students’ awareness of the ways in which literary texts may be interpreted differently within particular literary, cultural and socio-historical contexts
  • An ability to produce independent work of an appropriately academic standard.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Discuss the background, theoretical underpinnings and key strategies of a number of critical approaches in an intelligent and coherent manner
  • Understand the ways in which the interpretation of literary texts can vary in accordance with literary, cultural and socio-historical factors
  • Use critical terminology accurately
  • Produce sophisticated and imaginative analyses of literary texts using relevant critical concepts
  • Make appropriate use of both primary and secondary source materials, including theoretical essays.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (2500 words)

OPEN TO INTERPRETATION: TWENTIETH-CENTURY THEORY AND FICTION II - optional module


OPEN TO INTERPRETATION: TWENTIETH-CENTURY THEORY AND FICTION II: details currently unavailable

THEOLOGY IN THE SECOND MILLENNIUM: ENGAGING WITH PARADIGM SHIFTS - optional module


MODULE TITLE : THEOLOGY IN THE SECOND MILLENNIUM: ENGAGING WITH PARADIGM SHIFTS

MODULE CODE : THU500


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will focus on major paradigm shifts in theology throughout the second millennium. It starts with the wisdom traditions of Monasticism and the shift to Scholastic Theology and Philosophy of the medieval universities. Then it engages the shift through Nominalism which leads into the thinking of the Reformers and the emergence of a recognisable Protestant Paradigm. The effect of the rise of science and the turn to the subject in the Enlightenment will be explored in the movement of liberal theology in Germany and France. The renewal of critical historical studies in the 19th century and their effect on e.g. Biblical Studies, Patristics, Church History and Systematics will then be explored; concluding with the emergence of Christianity as a post-colonial global religion within a polycentric world and the challenges this has brought to theology as a discipline. 

The focus of the course will be on movements and paradigm shifts rather than individual thinkers. Each taught session will be complemented by a critical reading seminar in which primary sources will be engaged by voices from modern and contemporary critical approaches e.g. contextual, post-colonialist, Marxist, and feminist, etc. Seminars will extend the ways in which students critically engage with the key theological and philosophical movements of the second millennium. 

The module aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills foundational to success in the rest of the programme and to provide an opportunity to develop skills of collaborative research work and to experience the process of refining ideas that is part of the research experience.

 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Engage critically with the theological shifts across the second millennium.
  • Develop an understanding of the extra-theological influences that provoke paradigm shifts.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Analyse and assess the formative philosophical, social and cultural influences that shaped the medieval and modern theological perspectives.
  • Explore in depth significant theological paradigm shifts.
  • Develop a sense of the different vocabularies and conceptual frameworks of theologies in conflict.
  • Read, discuss and compare primary and secondary material from the second millennium, analysing and evaluating its significance in the development of Christian Theology.
  • Identify key social and political implications of shifts in theology and the ethical issues they provoked e.g. Crusades, the Inquisition, religious intolerance.
  • Debate and reflect in seminar on the on-going influence of key figures and ideas e.g. Aquinas, Luther, Schleiermacher.
  • Research, write, and deliver concise oral, visual and written expository pieces.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Annotated Bibliography (750 words)

Component 2 - 60% Group Poster Presentation (Equivalence, 1000 words)

DEVELOPING THEOLOGICAL RESEARCH AND WRITING - optional module


DEVELOPING THEOLOGICAL RESEARCH AND WRITING: details currently unavailable

SHAKESPEARE AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES - optional module


MODULE TITLE : SHAKESPEARE AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES

MODULE CODE : ENU503


MODULE SUMMARY :

Students will be introduced to a range of early modern texts focussing on drama but also including prose and poetry. The module is intended to introduce students to the variety and richness of early modern literature and to the different dramatic genres of comedy, tragedy and history. Thematically, the module will explore issues of identity in the early modern period including such issues as gender, sexuality, race, social class, nationality, religion, interiority and kingship. Students will both contextualise early modern writing within its own period and learn to apply relevant theoretical and critical approaches such as feminist, psychoanalytical, gender studies, new historicist and cultural materialist theories of criticism. The module also introduces students to writing reviews of productions. Students will write a critical essay but will also see a live production of one of the plays studied and write a review of it. This contrast of writing forms is intended to help students understand the different expectations of different forms and to learn to write both in a concise way in the review and in a more structured and extended form in the essay.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 44.00
Independent : 156.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Help students gain a detailed knowledge of a substantial range of texts written by Shakespeare and his near contemporaries in the early modern period
  • Help students' gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the historical, cultural and social contexts in which the texts were produced and how these can affect their interpretation
  • Develop students' ability to think critically about literature from the period and to write about it in ways that are structured, reflective and analytical
  • Develop students' knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically a range of theoretical approaches to texts, such as New Historicism, Cultural Materialism and those pertaining to issues of identity
  • Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of secondary critical material and resources such as JSTOR, Project Muse, the internet
  • Ensure students see at least one live performance of a play from the Renaissance period.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Gain a detailed knowledge of a substantial range of texts from the renaissance
  • Gain a detailed knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts of the production of texts from the renaissance
  • Develop their knowledge and understanding of a range of theoretical approaches to texts, especially those pertaining to issues of identity
  • Apply a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of texts from the renaissance
  • Develop their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured
  • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material
  • Develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 30% Critical Review of a Theatrical Production (1500 words)

Component 2 - 70% Essay (3000 words)

THE LITERARY SCENE - optional module


THE LITERARY SCENE: details currently unavailable

THE ABRAHAMIC INHERITANCE: CHRISTIANITY, ISLAM AND JUDAISM - optional module


MODULE TITLE : THE ABRAHAMIC INHERITANCE: CHRISTIANITY, ISLAM AND JUDAISM

MODULE CODE : THU503


MODULE SUMMARY :

The story of Abraham has influenced theologians both ancient and modern, as well as painters, sculptors and musicians. In this module we’ll explore this influence and think about what it means in the twenty-first century. Beginning from the canonical accounts of Abraham’s life contained in Genesis and in the Qur’an, you will uncover the different ways that memories of Abraham have shaped the past and continue to shape the present. As you do so you will return to key terms that are often used in the study of theology and religions. Words like ‘monotheism’, ‘scripture’ and ‘tradition’ will take on new meanings for you. To reflect the diversity of Abraham’s influence the module offers you an opportunity to develop your own creative response to the Abrahamic inheritance.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Extend the students’ knowledge and understanding of Christianity, Islam and Judaism.
  • Introduce the students to the varied ways in which the story of Abraham has been received and re-articulated in different religious and social contexts.
  • Encourage students to discuss and evaluate the way that the Abrahamic story is rearticulated to express particular social or cultural questions.
  • Develop in students a sensitivity to the nature of primary and secondary source material in order to prepare them for further advanced study of religion and theology.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Describe the relationship between beliefs, practices, traditions, texts and history of three of the world’s major religions
  • Analyse the relationship between religions and wider culture and society, constructing and creating a response to this relationship
  • Demonstrate that the Abrahamic inheritance is shaped by diverse and competing ways of remembering Abraham and evaluate how the story of Abraham has been used by different groups at different times in history
  • Interpret, debate and assess religious texts from a variety of religious traditions and standpoints, situating them in wider social, cultural and ethical changes
  • Compose written and spoken English in order to explain and debate knowledge of the subject
  • Collect and catalogue research material relevant to their assessment, using ICT skills
  • Work with others and by oneself in order to prepare a creative response to the Abrahamic inheritance, reflecting on their own learning as they do so.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Portfolio (2500 words or equivalent)

ISSUES IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : ISSUES IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION

MODULE CODE : THU504


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module aims to develop the knowledge & understanding for those students with a particular interest for RE in schools through identifying both established and potential issues for the subject as part of the statutory curriculum within England. The module will examine research into some of the main factors influencing the delivery of RE in schools today and the impact this has on pupil understanding. It will also look at the future of RE and the effect some of these issues may have in the way the subject develops. By having a thorough knowledge on the subject area and the challenges facing it the students will be well equipped for any future careers involving Religious Education as well as developing a range of transferable skills.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Develop a thorough understanding of the position of RE in schools and the way in which the subject is delivered;

  • Evaluate particular issues regarding the delivery of RE in the classroom

  • Critically reflect on the potential for current issues to affect the future development of the subject

  • Develop research skills through exploration of key issues in the delivery of RE in the primary school

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of their understanding of the current position of RE in schools          

  • Identify and evaluate the main factors and challenges affecting the subject today

  • Effectively research a key issue in RE

  • Discuss issues from a range of viewpoints, demonstrating sensitivity to the different parties involved and an awareness of the complexity of the field

  • Analyse appropriate research and documents in relation to issues in RE

  • Apply findings from research into issues in RE and suggest possible ways in which these could be addressed in school and beyond

  • Demonstrate in written and verbal communication a clear, logical, structured and well-researched approach to the issues

  • During group discussions display an awareness of differing views and sensitivity to different opinions

  • Critically evaluate their own understanding and approaches to issues in RE and identify areas for improvement

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Self Evaluation/Reflection (1000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Research Project (3000 words)

TEXT, CULTURE AND INTERPRETATION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : TEXT, CULTURE AND INTERPRETATION

MODULE CODE : THU506


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module provides the opportunity for students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the Jewish and Christian bible, and their skills of critically interpreting primary religious texts from a range of interpretational perspectives. A selection of biblical texts will be studied, which represent the major literary genres found within the Bible (e.g.  three or more of prophecy, apocalyptic, wisdom, narrative, poetry, gospels and letters) and which are drawn from both the Old and the New Testament. These will be explored both in relation to their original historical contexts and using the lens of some contemporary hermeneutical and cultural perspectives (e.g. feminist approaches, post-colonial perspectives, literary criticism). Students will be able to reflect critically on the reception history of biblical texts (e.g. in literature and art, and the reuse within the bible itself of older written and oral traditions), on their use in current ethical debates (e.g. around the equality of women or attitudes to homosexuality), and on the issues surrounding the task of bible translation.

,

This module provides the opportunity for students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the Jewish and Christian bible, and their skills of critically interpreting primary religious texts from a range of interpretational perspectives. A selection of biblical texts will be studied, which represent the major literary genres found within the Bible (e.g.  three or more of prophecy, apocalyptic, wisdom, narrative, poetry, gospels and letters) and which are drawn from both the Old and the New Testament. These will be explored both in relation to their original historical contexts and using the lens of some contemporary hermeneutical and cultural perspectives (e.g. feminist approaches, post-colonial perspectives, literary criticism). Students will be able to reflect critically on the reception history of biblical texts (e.g. in literature and art, and the reuse within the bible itself of older written and oral traditions), on their use in current ethical debates (e.g. around the equality of women or attitudes to homosexuality), and on the issues surrounding the task of bible translation.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Deepen the students’ knowledge and understanding of the theological sub-discipline of biblical studies
  • Develop the students’ ability to analyse from a variety of hermeneutical perspectives the primary religious texts of the Jewish and Christian bible
  • Foster an appreciation of the connections between biblical texts and the reuse within the bible of older traditions
  • Develop in students an appreciation of the relationship between biblical texts and contemporary cultural and ethical debates.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate a sound knowledge and understanding of a range of biblical texts and genres
  • Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of some contemporary critical hermeneutical perspectives
  • Relate biblical texts to one another and to wider ethical and/or cultural issues
  • Develop their skills of critically analysing primary religious texts
  • Deepen their sensitivity to the complexity of religious language and experience as captured in the sacred texts of some of the world’s major religions
  • Develop their skills of independent learning and research
  • Write a fluent and coherent exegetical essay.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Exegetical Essay (4000 words)

VICTORIAN LITERATURE ON SCREEN - optional module


MODULE TITLE : VICTORIAN LITERATURE ON SCREEN

MODULE CODE : ENU506


MODULE SUMMARY :

In this module, students will study theories and approaches related to text- to- screen adaptations with a particular focus on the ways in which canonical Victorian novels and narrative poems have been translated for film and television. They will explore the workings of prose in relation to visual narratives, concentrating on the differences between the two media. They will examine the debates about whether film adaptations should be judged according to their fidelity to the source text and how far it is useful to read them as successful or unsuccessful depending on how particular directors have illuminated or even obscured the ‘meaning’ of source texts in their film interpretations. They will be encouraged to see textual analysis as part of a wider consideration of cultural history through a study of how films and TV productions from 1940 to the present day have variously interpreted the issues of Victorian identity inscribed within their sources, and particularly how they have represented nineteenth century conceptions of cultural power, faith and human psychology. Following a study of specific film adaptations, students will analyse a Victorian text and film adaptation or adaptations of their choice.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Help students gain a detailed knowledge of a substantial range of Victorian texts and their film adaptations
  • Help students' gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the historical, cultural and social contexts in which the literature was written and the film adaptations produced and how these can affect their interpretation
  • Develop students' ability to think critically about Victorian Literature and film adaptations and to write about it in ways that are structured, reflective and analytical
  • Develop students' knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically a range of theoretical approaches to Victorian literature and film adaptations including adaptation theory, New Historicism and Cultural Materialism
  • Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of secondary critical material and resources such as JSTOR, Project Muse and the internet
  • Explore the relationship between literature and film, with a focus on the different conventions through which meaning is generated within these two forms.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Gain a detailed knowledge of a substantial range of Victorian texts and their film adaptations
  • Gain a detailed knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts in which the literature was written and the film adaptations produced
  • Develop their knowledge and understanding of a range of range of theoretical approaches to Victorian literature and film adaptations including adaptation theory, New Historicism and Cultural Materialism
  • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary characteristics of nineteenth-century literature and the audio and visual characteristics of different film and TV adaptations
  • Gain a detailed knowledge of the relationship between literature and film
  • Recognise the relationship between literature and film
  • Apply a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of Victorian texts and their film adaptations
  • Develop their ability to use critical and analytical terminology associated with literature and film and appropriate scholarly citation
  • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of generic conventions of Victorian literature and film adaptations and the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured
  • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material
  • Develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to  meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Essay (4500 words)

SHORT FICTION - optional module


SHORT FICTION: details currently unavailable

ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ETHICS - optional module


ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ETHICS: details currently unavailable

HERETICS AND RADICALS - optional module


HERETICS AND RADICALS: details currently unavailable

CATHEDRALS AND THE ENGLISH SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS - optional module


CATHEDRALS AND THE ENGLISH SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS: details currently unavailable

EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE - optional module


MODULE TITLE : EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE

MODULE CODE : THU505


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will provide opportunity for an in-depth study of both early Christianity in general and of particular early Christian texts, drawn from the New Testament and/or extra-canonical literature dating from the first and second centuries CE. There will be a particular focus on the development of the early church at the time of Paul, and the practical, ethical and doctrinal difficulties faced by the Christian communities he founded as recorded in his letters and the Acts of the Apostles. Students will be encouraged to actively engage in analysis and interpretation of the set texts of the major Pauline letters and the Acts of the Apostles. They will be required to locate these writings firmly in their socio-historical context, thereby developing their knowledge of the social, political and religious world of first century Judaism and the Roman Empire. Topics covered in the module may include some of, for example, early Christian theologies of salvation, christologies, eschatological expectations, forms of worship, community cohesion and identity, relations with Judaism, and ethical issues such as the role of women, attitudes to sex, and wealth and poverty.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop the students’ knowledge and understanding of the history and theology of the early Christian movement
  • Develop the students’ understanding of the historical, political and religious background of the New Testament and of the importance of this for biblical interpretation
  • Deepen the students’ knowledge and understanding of some of the key texts in the early Christian literary corpus, especially the writings of Paul
  • Develop the students’ ability to critically analyse biblical texts from a variety of interpretational perspectives.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate a sound knowledge and understanding of a range of early Christian texts
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the history of the early Christian movement and its first century context
  • Offer informed comment on the religious, social and political background of selected New Testament texts
  • Demonstrate a critical and empathetic understanding of the beliefs, practices and ethical values of the early Christians
  • Develop their skills of critically analysing primary religious texts from a variety of perspectives
  • Develop their skills of academic writing
  • Use the biblical commentary format fluently and effectively.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Textual Commentaries on Three Set Texts (2500 words)

LONDON IN THE LONG EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - optional module


London in the Long Eighteenth Century


Module Title: London in the Long Eighteenth Century

Module Code: ENU509

Module Summary: In the middle of the eighteenth century, Samuel Johnson observed that when one is tired of London, one is tired of life. From 1660-1789 London was at once the rapidly expanding capitol city of a growing empire, a place of wealth and sophistication and a hotbed of crime, filth, stench and corruption and it inspired much brilliant literature. This module takes a cultural geographical approach to literary studies looking at the writing about places and people to explore issues of power relationships and identity construction. Looking at the writing of and about London in the period from the restoration of the English monarchy (1660) to the start of the French Revolution (1789), we will study a range of texts in different forms such as plays, ballads, short novels, periodicals, poetry and prose and which relate to, depict, or comment on London people, places and life. We will study both popular culture, including forms such as chapbooks, woodcuts, cartoons and broadsides and high culture including forms such as the Horatian satire, mock epic, plays and paintings. Topics to be examined might include libertinism and sexuality (Whitehall and the Court), crime (Newgate Prison), scandal and reputation, the theatre (Drury Lane), trade and commerce, (the Thames and the City of London), hack writing, (Grub Street) and disease (The Great Plague). These topics will serve as a means to discuss such issues as the representation of gender, class, sexuality, race, morality, religion, notions of the crowd, power and authority. This module will also consider the relationship between literature and art, in particular satiric art and caricature (Hogarth). There will be a visit to London to see some of the key sites of the 18th century. Students will also receive training on the use of eighteenth century material to aid their research for the project task which forms the method of assessment on this module

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 45 (33 plus 12 hour trip to London)
Independent: 155
Placement: 0
Total: 200

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to:

• Help students gain a detailed knowledge of a substantial range of texts written in the period 1660-1789 which relate to London;
• Help students' gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the historical, cultural and social contexts in which the texts were produced and how these can affect their interpretation;
• Develop students' ability to think critically about literature from the period and to write about it in ways that are structured, reflective and analytical;
• Develop students' knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically a range of theoretical approaches to texts.
• Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of primary material and secondary critical material and resources such as EEBO, ECCO, JSTOR, Project Muse, the internet;
• Help students develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances;

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

• Gain a detailed knowledge of a substantial range of texts pertaining to London from the long eighteenth century;
• Gain a detailed knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts of the production of texts from the renaissance;
• Develop their knowledge and understanding of a range of theoretical approaches to texts, especially those pertaining to issues of identity
• Apply a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of texts from the long-eighteenth century;
• Develop their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation
• Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
• Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material;
• Develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

Assessment:
Component 1: 50% Portfolio task (2500 words)

Component 2: 50% Examination (2 hours)

ROMANTIC REBELS - optional module


MODULE TITLE : ROMANTIC REBELS

MODULE CODE : ENU510


MODULE SUMMARY :

Students will be introduced to a range of texts from the Romantic Period c. 1789-1837, including particularly, poetry and prose. It looks at the large philosophical ideas and themes of the period including those of revolution, the rise of the individual, women's rights, the sublime, the gothic, nature, notions of  the 'Romantic' and 'Romanticism', the city and the country, social class, childhood and ideas of radicalism and rebellion. We will focus on the study of the major poets of the period - Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley and Byron - but also on other political and radical writers of the period including authors such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Shelley, William Godwin, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine. Students will contextualise their study of Romanticism by looking at other art forms, particularly painting and art from the period and learn to apply relevant theoretical and critical approaches such as feminist, historicist, and interdisciplinary approaches.  This module will be taught as introductory days at the start of semester followed by a series of workshop days to complete a group project.

 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 56.00
Independent : 144.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Help students gain a detailed knowledge of a substantial range of texts written in the period c. 1789-1837;
  • Help students' gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the historical, cultural, political, economic, philosophical and social contexts in which the texts were produced and how these can affect their interpretation;
  • Develop students' ability to think critically about literature from the period and to write about it in ways that are structured, reflective and analytical;
  • Develop students' knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically a range of theoretical approaches to texts, such as feminism, historicism, and interdisciplinary approaches;
  • Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of secondary critical material and resources such as JSTOR, Project Muse, the internet;
  • to collaborate productively with others in research, negotiation, problem solving, writing, and presentation skills to an advanced level;
  • Give students a sense of cultural geography and an opportunity to work with manuscripts and primary resources from the period with a view to understanding the process of inspiration and revision inherent in textual production.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Gain a detailed knowledge of a substantial range of texts from the Romantic period and of the historical, cultural, political, economic, philosophical and social contexts of the production of texts from the period;
  • Develop their knowledge and understanding of a range of theoretical approaches to texts, including interdisciplinary approaches and apply a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of texts;
  • To understand the processes of textual production in the Romantic age and the implications of this for issues of authorship and reception.
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured and appropriately referenced;
  • Develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.
  • To collaborate productively with others in research, negotiation, problem solving, writing, and presentation skills to an advanced level.

 

 

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Group Project (2000 word equivalent, per individual)

Component 2 - 50% Critical Analysis (2500 words)

RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION: EUROPE IN CHANGE AND TRANSITION - optional module


Renaissance and Reformation: Europe in Change and Transition


Module Title: Renaissance and Reformation: Europe in Change and Transition

Module Code: THU509

Module Summary:
This module covers a fundamental period of radical change and development in the western world – the Renaissance and Reformation. The module seeks to develop an understanding of these complex phenomena and explore their meanings through (translated) primary sources, images, key events and the lives of individuals. We will concentrate on continental Europe with particular focus on Renaissance Florence and Reformation Germany and Switzerland.

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 36 (12 x 3) made up lectures 20, interpretation of Renaissance painting workshop 2 ; visit to the Barber Institute 2 ; seminars 10 and textual analysis modelling 2)
Independent: 164
Placement: 0
Total: 200

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to develop:

• A command of the history of the key political, social, cultural and religious changes in Europe between 1400 and 1550
• An understanding of, and the ability to critically evaluate, a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of European history, 1400-1550
• The ability to engage with major theological ideas and themes within their historical context and to show awareness of their long-term influence.
• The ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data.
• The ability to work as part of a team, dividing tasks
• The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in speech appropriate to the audience
• The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in writing
• The ability to use word-processing, the College Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for history

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

• Understand the history of key political, social, cultural and religious changes in Europe, 1440-1550
• Analyse and Evaluate theological texts and (translated) primary sources/data relating to Europe, 1400-1550
• Understand and evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the Renaissance and Reformation
• Successfully gather, sort and synthesise data on a range of theological themes within the period of study
• Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data
• Communicate clearly, coherently and with structure in writing.
• Use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for historical theology.

Assessment:

Component 1: 40% 1,500 word individual commentary on a Renaissance painting.

Component 2: 60% 2500 word commentary on a set Reformation document.

Year 3 modules


LITERATURE IN THE MODERN WORLD 1900-1950 - optional module


MODULE TITLE : LITERATURE IN THE MODERN WORLD 1900 - 1950

MODULE CODE : ENU603


MODULE SUMMARY :

The module will engage students in a socio-historical and politically situated study of a number of 20th century texts pre-World War 11. They will examine developments in literary form during this period and the relationship of these emerging forms with the cultural context in which texts were produced and received. The module will begin with a preliminary exploration of the transition between early Victorianism tendencies to optimism and realism in literature through to a growing sense of pessimism and literary experimentalism in fin de siècle writing to the despair and fragmentation of style and mood which characterised literature written after the First World War. Students will then study Modernism as a style, form and set of ideas, exploring the characteristics in modernist novels, short stories and poems. Following this they will be introduced to popular realist and genre novels outside of the modernist paradigm, recently evaluated by critics working in Middlebrow studies as equally valid as iconic modernist texts in their representations of the modern world.    

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Help students gain a detailed knowledge of a substantial range of texts written in the early twentieth century
  • Help students' gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the historical, cultural and social contexts in which these texts were produced and how these can affect their interpretation;
  • Develop students' ability to think critically about literature from the period and to write about it in ways that are sophisticated, structured, reflective and analytical;
  • Develop students' knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate literature critically using concepts and ideas associated with modernism and the middlebrow
  • Enhance students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of secondary critical material and resources such as JSTOR, Project Muse, the internet.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Gain a detailed knowledge of a wide range of texts from the early part of the twentieth century
  • Gain a wide-ranging and sophisticated knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts of the production of texts written in the early part of the twentieth century
  • Gain a sophisticated knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary characteristics of and critical approaches to modernist and middlebrow texts written in the early part of the twentieth century
  • Apply in a sophisticated way a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of texts written in the early twentieth century
  • Develop to an advanced level their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation
  • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of generic conventions and the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
  • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level;
  • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to  meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 20% Written Analysis (1000 words)

Component 2 - 80% Essay (3500 words)

FROM IBSEN TO MILLER: DRAMA IN THE REALIST TRADITION - optional module


From Ibsen to Miller: Drama in the Realist Tradition


Module Title: From Ibsen to Miller: Drama in the Realist Tradition

Module Code: ENU605

Module Summary:
Students will be introduced to a range of dramatic texts mainly in the realist tradition (but also diversifying from that) from the late 19th century to the modern era and ranging from European plays in translation to British and American texts to give an international perspective. This enables students to trace the rich variety and development of this dramatic tradition and to gain insights into outstanding dramatic texts. It allows them to explore the ways that dramatists, over time and in different locations have had a perennial concerns with using drama to comment on society and the nature of human existence, and a range of issues including identity, gender, politics, race, religion, class, the family, childhood, the nature and purpose of art. Thematically, the module will explore these issues and will contextualise them in their times. Students will also explore different interpretations of these texts in productions. The module will encourage students to apply the theoretical knowledge they have gained earlier in their studies as well as offering the opportunity to trace the development of the realist tradition. Students will also gain insights into different theories and traditions such as Stanislvaski's method acting, Brecht's Epic Theatre and the Theatre of the Absurd. Students will write an essay which explores a theme or topic across a range of texts and take an exam

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 44 (36 plus 8 hour theatre trip)
Independent: 156
Placement: 0
Total: 200

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to:

• Help students gain a detailed knowledge of a wide range of dramatic texts and of written from the late 19th century to contemporary writing from different geographical areas and to have an awareness of the production history of these texts;
• Help students' gain a wide-ranging and detailed knowledge and understanding of a variety of contexts (including, social, historical, economic, political, philosophical and ideological contexts) in which the texts were written and produced and how these can affect their interpretation;
• Help students gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the generic conventions of drama and the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts;
• Develop in students advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
• Develop in students an advanced level of knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically a range of theoretical approaches to texts and theories of drama;
• Help students apply advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level;
• Ensure students see at least one live performance of a play from the Renaissance period.

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

• Gain a detailed knowledge of a wide range of dramatic texts and texts pertaining to drama from 19th century to the contemporary period with a focus on the realist tradition;
• Gain a detailed knowledge of the various contexts in which these plays were written and produced;
• Develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of the generic conventions of drama and the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts;
• Develop a detailed understanding of theoretical approaches to texts and of theories of drama;
• Apply a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of plays and drama-related texts from the late 19th century to the modern era;
• Help students gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the generic conventions of drama and the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts;
• Develop in students an advanced level of knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically a range of theoretical approaches to texts and theories of drama and use theoretical approaches appropriately;
• Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
• Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from a wide range of sources and to synthesise such material;
• Develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

Assessment:
Component 1: 50% Essay (2500 words)

A GOLDEN AGE?: POST-WAR LITERATURE - optional module


MODULE TITLE : A GOLDEN AGE?: POST-WAR LITERATURE

MODULE CODE : ENU607


MODULE SUMMARY :

Students will be introduced to a range of British literary texts from the period 1945-1970 alongside criticism contemporary to the period and more recent literary criticism. Students will place texts within historical, social and cultural contexts and examine the texts’ engagement with pertinent contemporary issues, such as: class, social mobility, education, the welfare state, national identity, gender inequality, second-wave feminism, race, immigration, the move from austerity to affluence, advances in science and technology, the aftermath of the Second World War, and the Cold War. The module will also ask students to consider issues surrounding genre, narrative form, and the relationship between realism and experimentalism in literature of this period. The module aims to develop students’ understanding of a number of critical approaches relevant to the analysis of post-war literature, such as: feminism, postcolonialism, poststructuralism, psychoanalysis, Marxism and ecocriticism. Students will develop an awareness of how literary criticism has evolved over the last 60 years, undertake research on a specific and relevant topic, critically analyse literary texts, and produce a cogent, scholarly argument informed by specific critical concepts.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop students’ ability to relate literary texts of the post-war period to their historical, social and cultural contexts
  • Develop students’ ability to critically analyse and compare the set texts, evaluating their similarities and differences
  • Further develop students’ awareness of modern and contemporary critical practices and their ability to select and apply appropriate methods of criticism to literary texts from the post-war period
  • Enable students to explicate and negotiate differences in critical opinion and the literary interpretation of texts at different historical periods

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Gain a detailed knowledge of a wide range of texts from the post-war period
  • Gain a wide-ranging and sophisticated knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts of the production of texts in the post-war period
  • Develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of a wide range of theoretical approaches relevant to the analysis of post-war literature
  • Apply in a sophisticated way a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of texts from the post-war period
  • Develop to an advanced level their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
  • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level;
  • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Examination (2 hours)

Component 2 - 60% Essay (2500 words)

EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE - optional module


MODULE TITLE : EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE

MODULE CODE : THU605


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will provide opportunity for an in-depth study of both early Christianity in general and of particular early Christian texts, drawn from the New Testament and/or extra-canonical literature dating from the first and second centuries CE. There will be a particular focus on the development of the early church at the time of Paul, and the practical, ethical and doctrinal difficulties faced by the Christian communities he founded as recorded in his letters and the Acts of the Apostles. Students will be encouraged to actively engage in analysis and interpretation of the set texts of the major Pauline letters and the Acts of the Apostles. They will be required to locate these writings firmly in their socio-historical context, thereby developing their knowledge of the social, political and religious world of first century Judaism and the Roman Empire. Topics covered in the module may include some of, for example, early Christian theologies of salvation, christologies, eschatological expectations, forms of worship, community cohesion and identity, relations with Judaism, and ethical issues such as the role of women, attitudes to sex, and wealth and poverty. Students will be expected to engage fully with a range of critical perspectives on major aspects of Paul’s theology, including responding to the challenges posed to traditional post-Reformation accounts of Paul’s thought by the so-called ‘New Perspective on Paul’; specific areas considered may include, for example, his use of the Old Testament, his understanding of the place of the law in salvation, and his view on the future of Israel.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop the students’ knowledge and understanding of the history and theology of the early Christian movement
  • Develop the students’ understanding of the historical, political and religious background of the New Testament and of the importance of this for biblical interpretation
  • Foster in students a critical understanding of the theology of Paul
  • Deepen the students’ knowledge and understanding of some key texts in the early Christian literary corpus
  • Extend the students’ ability to critically analyse biblical texts from a variety of interpretational perspectives.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate an in-depth knowledge and a critical understanding of key early Christian texts
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the religious, social and political background of the early Christian movement
  • Demonstrate a critical engagement with a wide range of perspectives on the theology of Paul
  • Demonstrate a critical and empathetic understanding of the beliefs, practices and ethical values of the early Christians
  • Develop their skills of critically analysing primary religious texts from a variety of perspectives
  • Develop their skills of academic writing.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Textual Exegeses of Two Set Texts (2500 words)

RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION: EUROPE IN CHANGE AND TRANSITION - optional module


Renaissance and Reformation: Europe in Change and Transition


Module Title: Renaissance and Reformation: Europe in Change and Transition

Module Code: THU609

Module Summary:
This module covers a fundamental period in the development of the western world – the Renaissance and Reformation. The module seeks to develop an understanding of these complex phenomena and their effect on Christian Theology and Practice by exploring their meanings through (translated) primary sources, images, key events and the lives of key individuals. We will concentrate on continental Europe with particular focus on Renaissance Florence and Reformation Germany and Switzerland.

In addition it will examine the various schools of interpretation of this period of European History by surveying not only classic texts, but also contemporary historical and theological interpretations.

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 36
Independent: 164
Placement: 0
Total: 200

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to develop:

• A critical command of the history of the key political, social, cultural and religious changes in Europe between 1400 and 1550
• An understanding of, and the ability to critically analyse, a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of European history, 1400-1550
• The ability to confidently engage with major theological ideas and themes within their historical context and to reflect intelligently on their long-term influence.
• The ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using a wide range of evidence from primary and secondary sources
• The ability to offer valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation
• The ability to work collaboratively effectively dividing tasks
• The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in speech appropriate to the audience
• The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in writing
• The ability to use word-processing, the College Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for historical theology

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

• Develop a command of the history of key political, social, cultural and religious changes in Europe, 1440-1550
• Analyse and evaluate theological texts and (translated) primary sources/data relating to Europe, 1400-1550
• Understand and critically analyse a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the Renaissance and Reformation
• Judiciously gather, sort and synthesise historical data and its impact on a range of theological themes within the period of study
• Develop fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from primary and secondary sources
• Work collaboratively on a shared presentation dividing tasks and synthesising approaches
• Communicate clearly, coherently and convincingly in well-structured writing.
• Communicate clearly, coherently, and convincingly in well-structured speech appropriate to the audience.
• Use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and demonstrate a discerning and critical use of other electronic sources of information for historical theology.

Assessment:

Component 1: 50% 15 minute Group Presentation (4-5 in a group) at The Barber Institute of Fine Arts (pass/fail) and 1,500 word individual critical analysis on a Renaissance painting.

Component 2: 50% 4000 word commentary of a key Reformation Text

GENDER TROUBLE - optional module


MODULE TITLE : GENDER TROUBLE

MODULE CODE : ENU606


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module asks students to examine literary representations of sex, gender, sexuality, and sexual transgression through the lens of relevant modern critical theories, such as: feminism, masculinity studies, gender studies, queer theory, psychoanalysis, postcolonialism, poststructuralism, and postmodernism. Through the analysis of a range of texts from the 20th-21st century, students will engage with concepts such as: the construction of gender and sexuality; performativity; heteronormativity; hegemonic constructs of gender; the relationship between desire and identity; intersections between gender identity, sexuality and race. Primary texts and the issues they raise will be placed in their socio-historical contexts and students will consider the literature’s cultural influence and the politicisation of literary texts. Primary texts may include literary fiction, popular/genre fiction, cinematic representations, poetry, graphic novels and dramatic texts, and thus provide the opportunity for students to consider the relationship between sex, gender and sexuality and particular modes of representation. Students will be required to engage with these topics in a mature and respectful way. The module will require students to undertake research on a specific topic, critically analyse literary texts, and produce a cogent, scholarly argument informed by specific critical concepts.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Enable students to engage with debates surrounding the understanding of sex, gender and sexuality and its representation through a range of literary texts
  • Help students gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of how historical, cultural and social contexts affect the representation of sex, gender and sexuality
  • Develop students’ ability to critically analyse and compare the set texts, evaluating their similarities and differences in representations of sex, gender and sexuality as well as their modes of representation
  • Develop students’ awareness of modern and contemporary critical practices relevant to the examination of sex, gender and sexuality and their ability to select and apply appropriate methods of criticism to literary texts
  • Enable students to articulate cogent, critical arguments about the representation of sex, gender and sexuality using relevant critical concepts and terminology.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Gain a detailed knowledge of a wide range of texts from the 20th-21st century which raise issues about sex, gender and sexuality in the modern world
  • Gain a wide-ranging and sophisticated knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts of the production of texts representing sex, gender and sexuality
  • Develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of a wide range of theoretical approaches relevant to the examination of representations of sex, gender and sexuality in literary texts
  • Apply in a sophisticated way a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of modern texts representing sex, gender and sexuality
  • Develop to an advanced level their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
  • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level;
  • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Essay (4500 words)

DISSERTATION IN THEOLOGY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : DISSERTATION IN THEOLOGY

MODULE CODE : THU601


MODULE SUMMARY :

This double module promotes the acquisition of in-depth and advanced subject knowledge and understanding, and fosters critical engagement with theological and/or philosophical issues. Building upon their interests and achievements at Levels 4 and 5, students will choose, in negotiation with tutors, a focused area of study within the broad field of Theology and Religious Studies. The dissertation focus may fall within any of the areas covered within the Programme, including Christian Theology, Biblical Studies, Philosophy of Religion, Ethics and Religious Education, but is dependent on the availability of staff expertise and suitable resources as well as student interest. Students will be expected to explore their chosen topic in an independent and original manner, researching widely, developing a systematic understanding of key aspects of their field of study, and clearly demonstrating advanced analytical skills.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 12.00
Independent : 388.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  400.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Foster the development of students’ independent research skills within the area of theological or philosophical studies and/or religious education
  • Promote the acquisition of in-depth and advanced subject knowledge and understanding
  • Develop the students’ ability to sustain a coherent and well-written argument and sustain it throughout a longer piece of work
  • Encourage critical engagement with theological and/or philosophical issues
  • Further develop the students’ analytical skills.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate a sound, accurate and in-depth knowledge and understanding of a specific topic within the broad field of Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies
  • Demonstrate a critical engagement with a range of competing viewpoints in relation to their chosen area of study
  • Develop their skills of analysis and critical evaluation of a range of primary and secondary sources
  • Develop their skills of independent academic research
  • Demonstrate their ability to sustain a well written and coherent argument over the length of a substantial dissertation.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 10% Individual Presentation (10 minutes, plus 5 minutes of questions)

Component 2 - 90% Dissertation (10000 words)

DISSERTATION IN ENGLISH - optional module


MODULE TITLE : DISSERTATION IN ENGLISH

MODULE CODE : ENU601


MODULE SUMMARY :

The dissertation allows students to undertake a sustained piece of independent research into a topic of their own choosing, and to apply the concepts, theories and methodologies (as relevant) that they have learnt about during their degree. Students can choose to work in the areas of Creative Writing, English literature, English language, Film Studies or Literature and Film; their research should show a grounding in current research and establish clear lines of original enquiry. Research skills specific to the module will be practised in a series of workshops towards the beginning of the module (time management; working with a supervisor; identifying strengths and area for development); thereafter, students will be supported by an individual supervisor with whom they will arrange individual tutorials.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 10.00
Independent : 390.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  400.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Enable students to gain an in-depth knowledge of a specific area of English studies in which they are particularly interested;
  • Teach students to develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary, linguistic and/or visual characteristics of genres, methods and/or theoretical approaches relevant to their dissertation;
  • Teach students how to choose and apply relevant methods and/or critical approaches independently in their close reading and analysis of texts;
  • Use the required institutional scholarly citation and referencing system accurately.
  • Allow student to show their achievement in using advanced literacy and communication skills which produce work that is coherently structured to produce a clear argument or evaluation, written in a scholarly way, including the use of critical, analytical and theoretical terminology;
  • Allow students to show their ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level;
  • Develop, in students, an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, and act independently as appropriate; independently research including scoping and planning a project, developing an appropriate reading list to support the project; manage their time, plan and organise their workload to  meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning;
  • Allow students to identify career opportunities and reflect critically on the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Gain an in-depth knowledge of a specific area of English studies;
  • Develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary, linguistic and/or visual characteristics of genres, methods and/or theoretical approaches relevant to their dissertation;
  • Apply relevant methods and/or critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of texts;
  • Use the required institutional scholarly citation and referencing system accurately.
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills which produce work that is coherently structured to produce a clear argument or evaluation, written in a scholarly way, including the use of critical, analytical and theoretical terminology;
  • Show their ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level;
  • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, and act independently as appropriate; independently research including scoping and planning a project, developing an appropriate reading list to support the project; manage their time, plan and organise their workload to  meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning;
  • Ability to identify career opportunities and reflect critically on the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 15% Presentation (5 minutes)

Component 2 - 85% Dissertation (10000 words)

THE LITERARY SCENE - optional module


THE LITERARY SCENE: details currently unavailable

FROM SUPERHEROES AND SYLVIA PLATH - optional module


FROM SUPERHEROES AND SYLVIA PLATH: details currently unavailable

POSTCOLONIAL BRITISH LITERATURE - optional module


POSTCOLONIAL BRITISH LITERATURE: details currently unavailable

THEOLOGY IN THE MAKING: CONTEXT, METHODS AND CREATIVITY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : THEOLOGY IN THE MAKING: CONTEXT, METHODS AND CREATIVITY

MODULE CODE : THU603


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module engages with the ways in which theology is constructed and how the great themes of Christion thought inter-relate and impact on one another. The aim is to develop skills in systematic and synthetic thinking and to provoke creativity in theological engagement with contemporary modes of thinking. The module will open with lectures on the development of theological method from early symbol to the medieval syntheses and on to modern systematics. Then it will examine the theological geography of current postmodernity with its focus on diversity, ambiguity, fragmentation, openness and play. 

Week by week the module will focus on a major theme e.g. Creation, Fall, Redemption, Christology, Trinity, Grace, Ecclesiology, Eschatology etc.  Each theme will be addressed by the tutor in a formal lecture followed by a seminar in which the same theme will be addressed by students who have prepared short 10 minute expositions of key thinkers from different periods on the same theme. The seminar will then identify and explore the issues which would affect any satisfactory statement of the same theme today. Throughout attention will be paid to how developments on one area of thought inevitably effect the development of thought in another e.g. the effect of modern science and of ecological issues on the doctrines of Creation and of theological Anthropology. 

The module aims through the critical exploration of the constructive nature of theological work to relate creatively the various areas of theological knowledge covered in the student’s degree to the contemporary search for meaning and understanding.

 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to develop: 

  • A command of the development of Christian theological method across the classical Medieval and modern periods.
  • An understanding of, and the ability to critically evaluate, a variety of attempts at constructing Christian theology against the backcloth of extra-theological influences, social, political and cultural.
  • The ability to engage with major theological ideas and themes and reveal their inter-connectedness.
  • The ability to share insights and research findings through clear, coherent and short papers.
  • The ability to speak fluently to a topic in public to an audience of peers.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Analyse and evaluate formative theological texts and their influence.
  • Understand and critically evaluate a variety of approaches to interpreting the received tradition.
  • Creatively construct contemporary statements in the light of current critical concerns, in politics, sexuality, gender and culture.
  • Successfully research, explore and synthesise data on the great Christian theological themes.
  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from primary (translated) and secondary sources.
  • Work collaboratively and constructively in seminars.
  • Communicate clearly, coherently and concisely in structured written form.
  • Communicate clearly, concisely, and effectively in fluent speech to peers.
  • Use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for theological research.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 30% Outline of Seminar Paper (1000 words)

Component 2 - 70% Contemporary and Personal Statement (3000 words)

TEXT, CULTURE AND INTERPRETATION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : TEXT, CULTURE AND INTERPRETATION

MODULE CODE : THU606


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module provides the opportunity for students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the Jewish and Christian bible, and their skills of critically interpreting primary religious texts from a range of interpretational perspectives. A selection of biblical texts will be studied, which represent the major literary genres found within the Bible (e.g.  three or more of prophecy, apocalyptic, wisdom, narrative, poetry, gospels and letters) and which are drawn from both the Old and the New Testament. These will be explored both in relation to their original historical contexts and using the lens of some contemporary hermeneutical and cultural perspectives (e.g. feminist approaches, post-colonial perspectives, literary criticism). Students will be able to reflect critically on the reception history of biblical texts (e.g. in literature and art, and the reuse within the bible itself of older written and oral traditions), on their use in current ethical debates (e.g. around the equality of women or attitudes to homosexuality), and on the issues surrounding the task of bible translation. They will be able to pursue a particular area of interest in the field by negotiating with tutors a focus for an individual research project.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Deepen the students’ knowledge and understanding of the theological sub-discipline of biblical studies
  • Develop the students’ ability to analyse from a variety of hermeneutical perspectives the primary religious texts of the Jewish and Christian bible
  • Foster an appreciation of the connections between biblical texts and the reuse within the bible of older traditions
  • Develop the students’ ability to critically evaluate the use of the bible in contemporary cultural and ethical debates

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

  • Demonstrate a wide-ranging knowledge and critical understanding of a range of biblical texts and genres
  • Critically analyse biblical texts from a range of hermeneutical perspectives
  • Evaluate the interaction between biblical texts and wider societal, cultural, ethical and literary issues
  • Demonstrate an appreciation of the complexity of religious language and experience as captured in the sacred texts of Judaism and Christianity
  • Develop their skills of independent learning and research
  • Demonstrate their fluency and skills in academic writing appropriate for Level 6
  • Pursue a particular area of interest in the field of biblical studies through an individual, negotiated project

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Individual Research Project (5000 words)

VIRTUES AND VALUES - optional module


VIRTUES AND VALUES: details currently unavailable

MYSTICISM EAST AND WEST - optional module


MYSTICISM EAST AND WEST: details currently unavailable

CATHEDRALS AND THE ENGLISH SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS - optional module


CATHEDRALS AND THE ENGLISH SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS: details currently unavailable

Course code


VQ63

Applications for full-time courses are made through UCAS.

Applications for flexible learning courses are made via Newman.

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