Theology BA (Hons)

Course length: 3 years full-time 4.5 years part-time (for further information on part-time course combinations available click here)

Overview

Why study Theology?

Theology is of great importance for understanding the world in which we live and is an ideal course for the student with wide interests, since it embraces a whole variety of other subjects, including history, literature, politics, sociology and anthropology. The course will extend your understanding of religion and culture, and encourage you to think about deep questions such as how human beings should live and what values you want to promote in society.  Almost every story covered in the media has an ethical, philosophical or religious dimension to it, so that theology is always relevant to the issues of today.

What does the course cover?

This course offers you the opportunity to study all the key areas of the wide subject of theology, including: Christian theology, both classical and modern; philosophy of religion; ethical theories and issues; biblical interpretation; and how different religions interact with society. There are also optional modules in religious education available for those who are aiming for a future career in teaching. Students from a range of backgrounds and prior learning experiences are welcome, and the course is open to those of any religious tradition or none.

What makes this course noteworthy?

The Theology tutors at Newman are all well-qualified and experienced lecturers. Class sizes are generally small, especially in the second and third year. The Theology department at Newman has an excellent reputation for the quality of its teaching and support of its students. The enthusiasm, friendliness and supportive approach of the Theology tutors are all consistently praised by students. 

The course emphasises the ability to read and engage with primary texts, such as the scriptures and creeds of the world’s religions and the writings of philosophers and theologians.

Field trips to places of worship and other sites of interest are organised annually.

A key feature of our undergraduate degrees at Newman is a compulsory work-related module (taken in the UK or overseas) which will not only provide you with valuable experience of work within an area you may be considering for a career and develop your general employability skills, but is a key asset when applying for jobs.

How will I be assessed?

The course uses a variety of assessments to help develop a range of different skills from traditional essay and report writing to oral presentations, analysis tasks, textual commentaries, case studies, portfolios, web design, reflective logs and research projects. 

What careers can I consider after this degree?

You will develop the skills of critical thinking, evaluation (of sources of information) and communication, as well as a level of cultural and religious understanding, all of which are valued by a wide range of employers. Many Theology graduates pursue careers closely related to the subject, such as teaching, social work, youth work or employment within the charities sector. Others bring the skills they acquire during the course to jobs within local government, the civil service, human resources departments, libraries, the NHS and the police service.


Newman University would like to draw your attention to our Academic Regulations. These regulations are your Terms of Reference and should be considered when making a decision to study with our institution.

Entry requirements


 

September 2018 Entry Requirements

You must achieve either at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma), or a total of 88 points from a maximum of 3 A levels.

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9 M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

5 GCSEs at grade 4/C or above including English at grade 5/Cor above or recognised equivalents, are also required.

Fees

Fees per academic year: 2017/18 

Full-time UK/EU Students: £9,250*

Please note for 2018/19 the University reserves the right to increase fees broadly in line with increases in inflation, or to reflect changes in government funding policies or changes agreed by Parliament.

Finance and Scholarship information

Additional costs:

A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is not required for entry into this programme, although it is in many cases required by employers before students can begin their Year 2 (level 5) work placement.  The cost of the DBS is currently £55 (including processing fee) with the option of subscribing to the update service which is currently £13 per year.  For more information on your DBS application please click here.

As a full time student, you will study a total of 120 credits each year. Credits are made up of mandatory modules and you may have a list of optional modules to choose from. Not every programme offers optional modules and when an optional module is available it will be clearly marked. All modules are listed below and you may not be required to complete all of these modules. Most modules are 20 credits and dissertations are 40 credits. Please note that not all optional modules run every year. For further information please email admissions@newman.ac.uk.

Year 1 modules


INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING


MODULE TITLE : INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING

MODULE CODE : PLU404


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module aims to equip students with the knowledge and self-management skills to make informed choices in preparing for work placement and the transition to employment or further study on graduation.  

Learners will be provided with the opportunities to develop awareness of the workplace, identify different career and study options, recognise and articulate their own experience, accomplishments and talents and plan and implement career management strategies for the short and long term.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 12.00
Independent : 88.00
Placement :
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Support students in developing informed choices about the career pathways available to them, in relation to their subject choices.
  • Prepare students for work-based learning and the application / exploration of subject knowledge in the workplace.

  • Encourage students to make connections between their learning, placement choice, future job aspirations and contribution to society.

  • Enable students to build confidence in securing work placements and future employment.

  • Support students in reflecting upon their preparation for their work placement and future employment.  

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

  1. Examine how their experiences, accomplishments, and abilities relate to employer expectations.

  2. Demonstrate engagement with, and an understanding of, graduate employment pathways and employability issues relating to their own career aspirations.

  3. Research organisations for the purposes of securing a work placement.

  4. Reflect upon their learning and development.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Reflective Essay and Appendix, 2000 words

METHODS IN THEOLOGICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDY


MODULE TITLE : METHODS IN THEOLOGICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDY

MODULE CODE : THU401


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module is a core part of students’ programme, which aims to support them in the transition into Higher Education and prepare them to succeed in their theological and philosophical studies. It provides the opportunity and time for students to acquire and/or develop the academic study skills, both general and subject-specific, on which they will need to draw throughout their course, and also introduces them to key aspects of subject knowledge.  The module will cover areas such as library and research skills; bibliographic referencing; academic writing; critical reading; summarizing and evaluating sources; and theological reflection. These skills will be practised and reinforced in weekly seminars. A substantial portion of contact time in seminars will also be devoted to engaging the students in the reading and analysis of primary theological and philosophical texts.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 40.00
Independent : 160.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • introduce students to the conventions of academic referencing
  • develop the students’ ability to undertake research in theology and philosophy
  • develop the students’ study skills and academic writing skills
  • develop the students’ skills in theological reflection
  • foster group identity and cohesion through e.g. seminars and on-lien discussion fora
  • promote the value and skills of independent learning
  • enable students to gain knowledge and understanding of introductory concepts in Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • gain a knowledge and understanding of introductory concepts in Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies
  • debate theological, philosophical and ethical issues from an informed range of perspectives
  • demonstrate their ability to engage with a range of primary theological and philosophical texts
  • develop a range of study skills to help prepare them for further successful study (e.g. ICT skills, library and research skills, referencing skills, and skills of academic writing)
  • develop as an independent and reflective learner.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 30% Portfolio of Study Skills Exercises (1000 words or equivalent)

Component 2 - 70% Portfolio of Theological Tasks (3000 words or equivalent)

RESEARCH IN WORLD RELIGIONS


MODULE TITLE : RESEARCH IN WORLD RELIGIONS

MODULE CODE : THU402


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will introduce you to the skills necessary to research religious studies both inside and outside the classroom. Offering a mix of guided and independent study, the module includes visits to religious centres in the Birmingham area. Through lectures and carefully guided practical sessions you will build up the skills necessary for research and study of religions. The teaching in the module is directed towards producing a portfolio of work responding to a visit to a religious centre.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop students’ independent learning and research skills for continual study of religion and theology.
  • Evaluate the different methods by which religious beliefs, writings, rituals etc. can be studied.
  • Critically reflect on the way that religion is conceptualised and examined in and outside the university.
  • Explore the interaction of religion and society through field trips.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Acquire knowledge and understanding of the beliefs, practices, traditions, texts and history of one or more of the world’s major religions. 
  • Debate and evaluate the competing claims of a variety of viewpoints on the nature of religion and its study.
  • Recognise the variety of research approaches and resources open to the student of religion.
  • Interpret a variety of primary source material (e.g. written, architectural etc.), appraise its value for the study of world religions, and thereby develop a sensitivity to the complexity of religious language and experience.
  • Review existing online resources for the study of religion, deploying ICT skills to collate this information before using written and oral communication skills to explain the outcomes of this review to others.
  • Revise and modify their understanding of the nature of religion in light of knowledge gained through the module.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (3000 words)

THEOLOGY: THE CLASSICAL TRADITION


MODULE TITLE : THEOLOGY: THE CLASSICAL TRADITION

MODULE CODE : THU404


MODULE SUMMARY :

Christian Theology explores big questions about what it means to be human and about the relationship between human beings and God. In this module we will engage with these questions as we study key theological thinkers from the first millennium of Christianity. In each teaching session we will encounter a new theologian and gain first-hand knowledge of the most important texts in the Christian tradition. 

As we study the writings of these theologians we will see how they state the big theological questions and how they try to answer them. By the end of the module we will understand why Christian theology has taken the shape it has. Each teaching session will help us develop the skills and knowledge necessary to engage with theological writings and the module concludes by asking the student to write a critical appraisal of the thinking of a great theologian on a major theme from the Christian theological tradition.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 33.00
Independent : 167.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop an understanding of various theologians in the classical tradition.
  • Foster an appreciation for how Christian theology has developed within a particular social and cultural context.
  • Encourage an awareness of the contribution of Classical theology to contemporary theology.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Describe and analyse the way that Classical Christian Theology was shaped by its social and cultural context
  • Outline and evaluate the development of Christian theology, focussing on a number of different case studies and recognising differences in doctrine, canon etc.
  • Read, discuss and compare primary and secondary material related to Classical Christian Theology, analysing their language and evaluating their utility in understanding the development of Christian Theology
  • Identify key ethical issues in the practice of theology and philosophy and develop theoretical understandings of theological practice that are applicable outside the classroom
  • Work together to debate and develop ideas about Christian Theology, communicating fluently in both written and oral form.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Reading of Seminar Text (1000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Essay (1500 words)

GOD AND THE PHILOSOPHERS


MODULE TITLE : GOD AND THE PHILOSOPHERS

MODULE CODE : THU405


MODULE SUMMARY :

In this module you will be introduced to some of the most exciting questions in contemporary philosophy such as; are we free? Can we know anything? What is evil? Through an encounter with the works of some of the most important philosophers in the Western tradition, for example Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Descartes, Hume and Nietzsche, you will explore how the idea of God has been vital in shaping our answers to these questions, and in forming our view of ourselves and the world around us.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Foster an appreciation of the wide variety of approaches taken by historical and contemporary thinkers towards the philosophy of religion
  • Encourage an understanding of the different philosophies of God proposed by philosophers of religion and philosophical theologians.
  • Develop knowledge of the thought of key philosophers of religion, both historical and contemporary.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate a competent knowledge of some of the main debates in Western philosophy of religion
  • Show an understanding of how contemporary debates have been informed by key historic philosophers
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how the philosophy of religion has been challenged by contemporary philosophers and theologians
  • Show a critical engagement with key contemporary philosophers of religion
  • Evaluate the relative worth of contemporary Anglo-American philosophy of religion and consider some alternative approaches to philosophical theology
  • Begin to express their own philosophical stance in a logical reasoned argument.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 30% Analysis of a Key Text (1000 words)

Component 2 - 70% Essay (2000 words)

READING SACRED TEXTS: THE JEWISH AND CHRISTIAN BIBLE


MODULE TITLE : READING SACRED TEXTS: THE JEWISH AND CHRISTIAN BIBLE

MODULE CODE : THU406


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module provides students with an introduction to the sub-discipline of Biblical Studies. Consideration will be given to some of the general critical issues which relate to the subject of reading sacred texts (e.g. translation, competing interpretations, and truth and authority claims). The main focus of the module will be on the specific contents of the Jewish and Christian Bible. Students will be introduced to the historical background, literary genres and major themes of the books of the Bible, and to important contemporary critical approaches to interpreting them (e.g. feminist and contextual approaches). Great emphasis will be placed on developing the students’ skills and confidence in reading and analysing the primary texts. A selection of passages from both Testaments will therefore be studied in detail, and the module will make use of an innovative series of podcasts explaining key aspects of biblical criticism, which were produced by Newman staff and students in 2012-13 as part of an HEA-funded project into innovative teaching methods in Biblical Studies.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Introduce students to key elements of subject knowledge and understanding in relation to the contents and major themes of the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament.
  • Introduce the students to the varied historical, geographical, literary and theological contexts of the books of the Jewish and Christian Bible, and to the impact these factors have on an informed understanding of the texts.
  • Encourage students to explore a variety of methods of reading and interpreting biblical texts, including feminist and contextual critical approaches.
  • Foster in students a sensitivity to the complexities involved in reading sacred texts in a variety of traditions (e.g. translation difficulties and truth claims).

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Acquire at least a basic knowledge and understanding of the contents, genres and themes present within the Jewish and Christian Bible.
  • Develop their sensitivity to the complexity of religious language and experience as captured in the sacred texts of some of the world’s major religions.
  • Develop their skills of independent learning and research.
  • Demonstrate their ability to engage critically with the primary religious texts contained within the Jewish and Christian Bible.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of key critical approaches in contemporary Biblical Studies (e.g. Feminist Biblical Criticism).
  • Write an informed biblical commentary on one or more set texts.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Commentaries on Two Set Texts (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

RELIGION AND POLITICS IN CONTEMPORARY BRITAIN


MODULE TITLE : RELIGION AND POLITICS IN CONTEMPORARY BRITAIN

MODULE CODE : THU407


MODULE SUMMARY :

In this module you will explore the religious landscape of contemporary Britain. You will be introduced to key ideas in the study of religion (e.g. religion; the body; secularisation; place; culture; modernity) as well as key thinkers. Each teaching session will encourage you to develop your own reading of a particular case study. Through teaching sessions, seminar discussions and in preparing your assessments you will gain a greater understanding of the political and philosophical shifts that have transformed religion in twenty-first century Britain.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Introduce the students to critical analytical approaches to the study of religion, drawing on case studies from contemporary Britain.
  • Develop the students’ understanding of the role of religion in the civic and private life of contemporary Britain.
  • Critically reflect on the relationship between religion and society, focussing in particular on the current place of religion in British society.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Define, demonstrate and evaluate the relationship between religion and society, focussing on different religions, particular case studies and competing claims made about religious belief in Britain today.
  • Read, discuss and compare primary and secondary material related to religion in twenty-first century Britain, evaluating their benefit to students of religion.
  • Identify key ethical issues in the study of religion and develop theoretical understandings of religion that are applicable outside the classroom.
  • Work together to debate and develop ideas about the religious make-up in Britain, communicating in both written and oral modes.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 70% Portfolio of Exercises (2000 words)

Component 2 - 30% Group Presentation (10 minutes)

Year 2 modules


WORK PLACEMENT


MODULE TITLE : WORK PLACEMENT

MODULE CODE : PLU502


MODULE SUMMARY :

This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 10.00
Independent : 90.00
Placement : 100.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement in a workplace setting.

  • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement and of their independent learning throughout the experience.

  • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.

  • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.

  • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to: 

  1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.

  2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.

  3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.

  4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - % PLACEMENT REGISTRATION FORM

Component 2 - 60% WORK PLACEMENT REFLECTION (2500 WORDS)

Component 3 - 40% WORK PLACEMENT EVALUATION: DIGITAL RESOURCE (1500 WORDS EQUIVALENT)

THEOLOGY IN THE SECOND MILLENNIUM: ENGAGING WITH PARADIGM SHIFTS


MODULE TITLE : THEOLOGY IN THE SECOND MILLENNIUM: ENGAGING WITH PARADIGM SHIFTS

MODULE CODE : THU500


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will focus on major paradigm shifts in theology throughout the second millennium. It starts with the wisdom traditions of Monasticism and the shift to Scholastic Theology and Philosophy of the medieval universities. Then it engages the shift through Nominalism which leads into the thinking of the Reformers and the emergence of a recognisable Protestant Paradigm. The effect of the rise of science and the turn to the subject in the Enlightenment will be explored in the movement of liberal theology in Germany and France. The renewal of critical historical studies in the 19th century and their effect on e.g. Biblical Studies, Patristics, Church History and Systematics will then be explored; concluding with the emergence of Christianity as a post-colonial global religion within a polycentric world and the challenges this has brought to theology as a discipline. 

The focus of the course will be on movements and paradigm shifts rather than individual thinkers. Each taught session will be complemented by a critical reading seminar in which primary sources will be engaged by voices from modern and contemporary critical approaches e.g. contextual, post-colonialist, Marxist, and feminist, etc. Seminars will extend the ways in which students critically engage with the key theological and philosophical movements of the second millennium. 

The module aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills foundational to success in the rest of the programme and to provide an opportunity to develop skills of collaborative research work and to experience the process of refining ideas that is part of the research experience.

 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Engage critically with the theological shifts across the second millennium.
  • Develop an understanding of the extra-theological influences that provoke paradigm shifts.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Analyse and assess the formative philosophical, social and cultural influences that shaped the medieval and modern theological perspectives.
  • Explore in depth significant theological paradigm shifts.
  • Develop a sense of the different vocabularies and conceptual frameworks of theologies in conflict.
  • Read, discuss and compare primary and secondary material from the second millennium, analysing and evaluating its significance in the development of Christian Theology.
  • Identify key social and political implications of shifts in theology and the ethical issues they provoked e.g. Crusades, the Inquisition, religious intolerance.
  • Debate and reflect in seminar on the on-going influence of key figures and ideas e.g. Aquinas, Luther, Schleiermacher.
  • Research, write, and deliver concise oral, visual and written expository pieces.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Annotated Bibliography (750 words)

Component 2 - 60% Group Poster Presentation (Equivalence, 1000 words)

THE ABRAHAMIC INHERITANCE: CHRISTIANITY, ISLAM AND JUDAISM


MODULE TITLE : THE ABRAHAMIC INHERITANCE: CHRISTIANITY, ISLAM AND JUDAISM

MODULE CODE : THU503


MODULE SUMMARY :

The story of Abraham has influenced theologians both ancient and modern, as well as painters, sculptors and musicians. In this module we’ll explore this influence and think about what it means in the twenty-first century. Beginning from the canonical accounts of Abraham’s life contained in Genesis and in the Qur’an, you will uncover the different ways that memories of Abraham have shaped the past and continue to shape the present. As you do so you will return to key terms that are often used in the study of theology and religions. Words like ‘monotheism’, ‘scripture’ and ‘tradition’ will take on new meanings for you. To reflect the diversity of Abraham’s influence the module offers you an opportunity to develop your own creative response to the Abrahamic inheritance.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Extend the students’ knowledge and understanding of Christianity, Islam and Judaism.
  • Introduce the students to the varied ways in which the story of Abraham has been received and re-articulated in different religious and social contexts.
  • Encourage students to discuss and evaluate the way that the Abrahamic story is rearticulated to express particular social or cultural questions.
  • Develop in students a sensitivity to the nature of primary and secondary source material in order to prepare them for further advanced study of religion and theology.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Describe the relationship between beliefs, practices, traditions, texts and history of three of the world’s major religions
  • Analyse the relationship between religions and wider culture and society, constructing and creating a response to this relationship
  • Demonstrate that the Abrahamic inheritance is shaped by diverse and competing ways of remembering Abraham and evaluate how the story of Abraham has been used by different groups at different times in history
  • Interpret, debate and assess religious texts from a variety of religious traditions and standpoints, situating them in wider social, cultural and ethical changes
  • Compose written and spoken English in order to explain and debate knowledge of the subject
  • Collect and catalogue research material relevant to their assessment, using ICT skills
  • Work with others and by oneself in order to prepare a creative response to the Abrahamic inheritance, reflecting on their own learning as they do so.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Portfolio (2500 words or equivalent)

ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ETHICS


MODULE TITLE : ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ETHICS

MODULE CODE : THU507


MODULE SUMMARY :

Taking this module will enable you to examine some of the most pressing ethical debates of our age from human cloning and genetic modification to capital punishment and overseas military intervention. You will be encouraged to assess the arguments for and against different ethical positions, while developing an appreciation for the underlying philosophical issues like autonomy and choice, the value of human and non-human life, and the purpose of modern medicine.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop an understanding of some of the key debates in applied ethics.
  • Foster an awareness of the underlying philosophical and theological assumptions behind these debates.
  • Develop the student’s knowledge of the major ethical theories and their application.
  • Develop the student’s own carefully evaluated ethical standpoint.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate a competent knowledge of the major theories of ethics
  • Show an understanding of the philosophical issues that underlie many debates in contemporary ethics
  • Analyse the central arguments that surround several controversial issues in contemporary ethics and the different positions of leading thinkers
  • Engage confidently and critically with some of the key contemporary thinkers in applied ethics
  • Critically evaluate how the main theories of ethics have been applied to some contemporary issues
  • Present their understanding in a logical fashion, demonstrating an awareness of the complexities represented in applying theory to praxis.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Participation in Consultation/Online Petition and Rationale (2500 words) or Short Letter and Essay (2500 words)

DEVELOPING THEOLOGICAL RESEARCH AND WRITING


MODULE TITLE : DEVELOPING THEOLOGICAL RESEARCH AND WRITING

MODULE CODE : THU520


MODULE SUMMARY :

A key feature of the module is the way it equips students with the knowledge and skills foundational to success in the rest of the program and prepares them for the requirements of dissertation level research. This is achieved through critical reading seminars and workshops and an assessment portfolio which will include an individual critical reflection applying one or more critical methods (1000 words), the preparation of a 500 word proposal for a co-authored conference paper, and the development of an initial research proposal for the final year dissertation.

By exploring the methods of theological research and writing, the module aims to develop students’ ability to apply a number of critical approaches, e.g. post-colonialism, post-structuralism, Marxism, feminism, to theological issues and movements.  This is intended to help students recognize and practice models of research, academic writing and presentation and to provide an opportunity to develop skills of collaborative research work so as to experience the process of refining ideas that is part of the research experience.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Engage critically with the process of theological research and writing.
  • Explore a range of contemporary critical frameworks valuable for theological research.
  • Develop advanced critical reading approaches to foundational texts from a variety of modern and contemporary approaches.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Develop a sense of the different vocabularies and conceptual frameworks of theology today.
  • Read, discuss and compare primary and secondary material and evaluate its significance in the development of theology.
  • Identify key social and political dimensions of theological discourse.
  • Research, write, and deliver concise written expository pieces including the preparation of an initial research proposal for the final year dissertation.
  • Gain a detailed knowledge of a range of contemporary critical approaches to theological writing.
  • Apply a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of texts.
  • Develop their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation.
  • Present cogent and persuasive arguments, orally and in writing, which are appropriately informed by theoretical approaches.
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these to create work that is coherently structured.
  • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesize such material.
  • Develop their productivity by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organize their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Portfolio of Short Theological Related Tasks (approximately 1800 words)

ISSUES IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : ISSUES IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION

MODULE CODE : THU504


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module aims to develop the knowledge & understanding for those students with a particular interest for RE in schools through identifying both established and potential issues for the subject as part of the statutory curriculum within England. The module will examine research into some of the main factors influencing the delivery of RE in schools today and the impact this has on pupil understanding. It will also look at the future of RE and the effect some of these issues may have in the way the subject develops. By having a thorough knowledge on the subject area and the challenges facing it the students will be well equipped for any future careers involving Religious Education as well as developing a range of transferable skills.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Develop a thorough understanding of the position of RE in schools and the way in which the subject is delivered;

  • Evaluate particular issues regarding the delivery of RE in the classroom

  • Critically reflect on the potential for current issues to affect the future development of the subject

  • Develop research skills through exploration of key issues in the delivery of RE in the primary school

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of their understanding of the current position of RE in schools          

  • Identify and evaluate the main factors and challenges affecting the subject today

  • Effectively research a key issue in RE

  • Discuss issues from a range of viewpoints, demonstrating sensitivity to the different parties involved and an awareness of the complexity of the field

  • Analyse appropriate research and documents in relation to issues in RE

  • Apply findings from research into issues in RE and suggest possible ways in which these could be addressed in school and beyond

  • Demonstrate in written and verbal communication a clear, logical, structured and well-researched approach to the issues

  • During group discussions display an awareness of differing views and sensitivity to different opinions

  • Critically evaluate their own understanding and approaches to issues in RE and identify areas for improvement

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Self Evaluation/Reflection (1000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Research Project (3000 words)

TEXT, CULTURE AND INTERPRETATION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : TEXT, CULTURE AND INTERPRETATION

MODULE CODE : THU506


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module provides the opportunity for students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the Jewish and Christian bible, and their skills of critically interpreting primary religious texts from a range of interpretational perspectives. A selection of biblical texts will be studied, which represent the major literary genres found within the Bible (e.g.  three or more of prophecy, apocalyptic, wisdom, narrative, poetry, gospels and letters) and which are drawn from both the Old and the New Testament. These will be explored both in relation to their original historical contexts and using the lens of some contemporary hermeneutical and cultural perspectives (e.g. feminist approaches, post-colonial perspectives, literary criticism). Students will be able to reflect critically on the reception history of biblical texts (e.g. in literature and art, and the reuse within the bible itself of older written and oral traditions), on their use in current ethical debates (e.g. around the equality of women or attitudes to homosexuality), and on the issues surrounding the task of bible translation.

,

This module provides the opportunity for students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the Jewish and Christian bible, and their skills of critically interpreting primary religious texts from a range of interpretational perspectives. A selection of biblical texts will be studied, which represent the major literary genres found within the Bible (e.g.  three or more of prophecy, apocalyptic, wisdom, narrative, poetry, gospels and letters) and which are drawn from both the Old and the New Testament. These will be explored both in relation to their original historical contexts and using the lens of some contemporary hermeneutical and cultural perspectives (e.g. feminist approaches, post-colonial perspectives, literary criticism). Students will be able to reflect critically on the reception history of biblical texts (e.g. in literature and art, and the reuse within the bible itself of older written and oral traditions), on their use in current ethical debates (e.g. around the equality of women or attitudes to homosexuality), and on the issues surrounding the task of bible translation.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Deepen the students’ knowledge and understanding of the theological sub-discipline of biblical studies
  • Develop the students’ ability to analyse from a variety of hermeneutical perspectives the primary religious texts of the Jewish and Christian bible
  • Foster an appreciation of the connections between biblical texts and the reuse within the bible of older traditions
  • Develop in students an appreciation of the relationship between biblical texts and contemporary cultural and ethical debates.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate a sound knowledge and understanding of a range of biblical texts and genres
  • Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of some contemporary critical hermeneutical perspectives
  • Relate biblical texts to one another and to wider ethical and/or cultural issues
  • Develop their skills of critically analysing primary religious texts
  • Deepen their sensitivity to the complexity of religious language and experience as captured in the sacred texts of some of the world’s major religions
  • Develop their skills of independent learning and research
  • Write a fluent and coherent exegetical essay.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Exegetical Essay (4000 words)

HERETICS AND RADICALS - optional module


MODULE TITLE : HERETICS AND RADICALS

MODULE CODE : THU508


MODULE SUMMARY :

From the monks of the ancient Egyptian deserts to the radical feminist critiques of the twenty-first century, the most innovative and exciting theological and philosophical thought has come not from the mainstream but from the edges. In this module you will discover and analyse ideas that have challenged and resisted accepted models of God and humanity. The module will encourage you to discuss and re-evaluate questions fundamental to human experience. Drawing on material from early Christianity and contemporary radical thought you will evaluate the way that theology is subverted and renewed by people who refuse to subscribe to accepted belief.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 33.00
Independent : 167.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop an understanding of various radical and heretical thinkers
  • Foster an appreciation for how radical and heretical thought has developed within a particular social and cultural context
  • Encourage an awareness of the contribution of radical and heretical thought to contemporary theology.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Describe and analyse the way that culture, society and politics challenge and shape theological thought.
  • Outline and evaluate the influence that radical and heretical thought has had on Christian theology, focussing on a number of different case studies and recognising competing claims about what is ‘correct belief.’
  • Read, discuss and compare primary and secondary material related to radical and heretical theologies, analysing their language and evaluating their benefit to the practice of theology.
  • Identify key ethical issues in the practice of theology and philosophy and develop theoretical understandings of theological practice that are applicable outside the classroom.
  • Work together to debate and develop your ideas about radical and heretical theologies, communicating in both written and oral form.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Portfolio of Tasks and Reflections (2000 words or equivalent)

Component 2 - 60% Essay (2000 words)

CATHEDRALS AND THE ENGLISH SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS - optional module


MODULE TITLE : CATHEDRALS AND THE ENGLISH SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS

MODULE CODE : THU510


MODULE SUMMARY :

The module will be taught in an intensive field study mode, based on a series of visits to regional Cathedrals and Minsters where there will be an opportunity to study the religious culture of England, at different historical stages, on different sites. There will be a series of lectures beforehand to introduce the history and architecture of Cathedrals, the varieties of English schools of spirituality, and the Cathedral as a context for changing modes of English religious and spiritual life. 

During the visits students will co-teach their peers through short presentations on aspects of English religious life related to the Cathedrals, e.g. pilgrimage, monasticism, church music and art, liturgy etc. On the basis of the  research related to their presentations the students will then plan and prepare a further piece of work that will link their original work to a wider context involving at least one other English Cathedral.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to develop: 

  • Awareness of the major developments in English Cathedral Art and Architect and their relation to the developing traditions of English Christian thought and practice
  • An ability to recognise the varieties of sacred space and their use and purpose across the shifts and changes of church life in England
  • Methods of collaborative work and planning
  • The ability to share the results of research with a wider audience in a public place
  • A growing competence in the construction of clear, coherent and competent expository texts
  • The ability to use word-processing, the university Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for research.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Recognise the origins and development of British Cathedral architecture
  • Engage systematically with English spiritual traditions and demonstrate a growing knowledge of the history of religious practice in one English region
  • Distinguish and highlight the variety of ways Cathedrals have interpreted and symbolised the Christian way
  • Relate changes in religious architecture to developments in theology, spirituality and wider political and economic issues
  • Acknowledge the key convergences and differences in emphasis and practice of the English Christian spiritual traditions.
  • Discuss the interaction of religious belief and cultural values in selected aspects of English Christianity as evidenced in the building and changing use of Cathedrals
  • Demonstrate theologically importance of Cathedral art and architecture as a means of interpreting the Christian message.
  • Engage with the variety of contemporary forms of engagement with traditional religious spaces and forms
  • Demonstrate the ability to plan written work, engage with secondary literature and some primary texts to construct clear arguments.
  • Demonstrate the ability to recognise alternative interpretations and their significance
  • Engage with peers in a shared working environment to work collaboratively on a shared project
  • Communicate clearly, coherently, fluently and with structure in writing and employ the standard referencing techniques of the discipline
  • Communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in speech appropriate to a public non-specialist audience
  • Use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information on Architecture and Spirituality.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Paired Public Presentation (equivalent of 2000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Personal Research Project Report (2000 words)

EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE - optional module


MODULE TITLE : EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE

MODULE CODE : THU505


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will provide opportunity for an in-depth study of both early Christianity in general and of particular early Christian texts, drawn from the New Testament and/or extra-canonical literature dating from the first and second centuries CE. There will be a particular focus on the development of the early church at the time of Paul, and the practical, ethical and doctrinal difficulties faced by the Christian communities he founded as recorded in his letters and the Acts of the Apostles. Students will be encouraged to actively engage in analysis and interpretation of the set texts of the major Pauline letters and the Acts of the Apostles. They will be required to locate these writings firmly in their socio-historical context, thereby developing their knowledge of the social, political and religious world of first century Judaism and the Roman Empire. Topics covered in the module may include some of, for example, early Christian theologies of salvation, christologies, eschatological expectations, forms of worship, community cohesion and identity, relations with Judaism, and ethical issues such as the role of women, attitudes to sex, and wealth and poverty.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop the students’ knowledge and understanding of the history and theology of the early Christian movement
  • Develop the students’ understanding of the historical, political and religious background of the New Testament and of the importance of this for biblical interpretation
  • Deepen the students’ knowledge and understanding of some of the key texts in the early Christian literary corpus, especially the writings of Paul
  • Develop the students’ ability to critically analyse biblical texts from a variety of interpretational perspectives.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate a sound knowledge and understanding of a range of early Christian texts
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the history of the early Christian movement and its first century context
  • Offer informed comment on the religious, social and political background of selected New Testament texts
  • Demonstrate a critical and empathetic understanding of the beliefs, practices and ethical values of the early Christians
  • Develop their skills of critically analysing primary religious texts from a variety of perspectives
  • Develop their skills of academic writing
  • Use the biblical commentary format fluently and effectively.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Textual Commentaries on Three Set Texts (2500 words)

RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION: EUROPE IN CHANGE AND TRANSITION - optional module


Renaissance and Reformation: Europe in Change and Transition


Module Title: Renaissance and Reformation: Europe in Change and Transition

Module Code: THU509

Module Summary:
This module covers a fundamental period of radical change and development in the western world – the Renaissance and Reformation. The module seeks to develop an understanding of these complex phenomena and explore their meanings through (translated) primary sources, images, key events and the lives of individuals. We will concentrate on continental Europe with particular focus on Renaissance Florence and Reformation Germany and Switzerland.

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 36 (12 x 3) made up lectures 20, interpretation of Renaissance painting workshop 2 ; visit to the Barber Institute 2 ; seminars 10 and textual analysis modelling 2)
Independent: 164
Placement: 0
Total: 200

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to develop:

• A command of the history of the key political, social, cultural and religious changes in Europe between 1400 and 1550
• An understanding of, and the ability to critically evaluate, a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of European history, 1400-1550
• The ability to engage with major theological ideas and themes within their historical context and to show awareness of their long-term influence.
• The ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data.
• The ability to work as part of a team, dividing tasks
• The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in speech appropriate to the audience
• The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in writing
• The ability to use word-processing, the College Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for history

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

•Understand the history of key political, social, cultural and religious changes in Europe, 1440-1550
•Analyse and Evaluate theological texts and (translated) primary sources/data relating to Europe, 1400-1550
•Understand and evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the Renaissance and Reformation
•Successfully gather, sort and synthesise data on a range of theological themes within the period of study
•Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data
•Communicate clearly, coherently and with structure in writing.
•Use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for historical theology.

Assessment:

Component 1: 40% 1,500 word individual commentary on a Renaissance painting.

Component 2: 60% 2500 word commentary on a set Reformation document.


Year 3 modules


EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE - optional module


MODULE TITLE : EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE

MODULE CODE : THU605


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will provide opportunity for an in-depth study of both early Christianity in general and of particular early Christian texts, drawn from the New Testament and/or extra-canonical literature dating from the first and second centuries CE. There will be a particular focus on the development of the early church at the time of Paul, and the practical, ethical and doctrinal difficulties faced by the Christian communities he founded as recorded in his letters and the Acts of the Apostles. Students will be encouraged to actively engage in analysis and interpretation of the set texts of the major Pauline letters and the Acts of the Apostles. They will be required to locate these writings firmly in their socio-historical context, thereby developing their knowledge of the social, political and religious world of first century Judaism and the Roman Empire. Topics covered in the module may include some of, for example, early Christian theologies of salvation, christologies, eschatological expectations, forms of worship, community cohesion and identity, relations with Judaism, and ethical issues such as the role of women, attitudes to sex, and wealth and poverty. Students will be expected to engage fully with a range of critical perspectives on major aspects of Paul’s theology, including responding to the challenges posed to traditional post-Reformation accounts of Paul’s thought by the so-called ‘New Perspective on Paul’; specific areas considered may include, for example, his use of the Old Testament, his understanding of the place of the law in salvation, and his view on the future of Israel.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop the students’ knowledge and understanding of the history and theology of the early Christian movement
  • Develop the students’ understanding of the historical, political and religious background of the New Testament and of the importance of this for biblical interpretation
  • Foster in students a critical understanding of the theology of Paul
  • Deepen the students’ knowledge and understanding of some key texts in the early Christian literary corpus
  • Extend the students’ ability to critically analyse biblical texts from a variety of interpretational perspectives.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate an in-depth knowledge and a critical understanding of key early Christian texts
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the religious, social and political background of the early Christian movement
  • Demonstrate a critical engagement with a wide range of perspectives on the theology of Paul
  • Demonstrate a critical and empathetic understanding of the beliefs, practices and ethical values of the early Christians
  • Develop their skills of critically analysing primary religious texts from a variety of perspectives
  • Develop their skills of academic writing.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Textual Exegeses of Two Set Texts (2500 words)

RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION: EUROPE IN CHANGE AND TRANSITION - optional module


Renaissance and Reformation: Europe in Change and Transition


Module Title: Renaissance and Reformation: Europe in Change and Transition

Module Code: THU609

Module Summary:
This module covers a fundamental period in the development of the western world – the Renaissance and Reformation. The module seeks to develop an understanding of these complex phenomena and their effect on Christian Theology and Practice by exploring their meanings through (translated) primary sources, images, key events and the lives of key individuals. We will concentrate on continental Europe with particular focus on Renaissance Florence and Reformation Germany and Switzerland.

In addition it will examine the various schools of interpretation of this period of European History by surveying not only classic texts, but also contemporary historical and theological interpretations.

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 36
Independent: 164
Placement: 0
Total: 200

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to develop:

• A critical command of the history of the key political, social, cultural and religious changes in Europe between 1400 and 1550
• An understanding of, and the ability to critically analyse, a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of European history, 1400-1550
• The ability to confidently engage with major theological ideas and themes within their historical context and to reflect intelligently on their long-term influence.
• The ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using a wide range of evidence from primary and secondary sources
• The ability to offer valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation
• The ability to work collaboratively effectively dividing tasks
• The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in speech appropriate to the audience
• The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in writing
• The ability to use word-processing, the College Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for historical theology

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

• Develop a command of the history of key political, social, cultural and religious changes in Europe, 1440-1550
• Analyse and evaluate theological texts and (translated) primary sources/data relating to Europe, 1400-1550
• Understand and critically analyse a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the Renaissance and Reformation
• Judiciously gather, sort and synthesise historical data and its impact on a range of theological themes within the period of study
• Develop fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from primary and secondary sources
• Work collaboratively on a shared presentation dividing tasks and synthesising approaches
• Communicate clearly, coherently and convincingly in well-structured writing.
• Communicate clearly, coherently, and convincingly in well-structured speech appropriate to the audience.
• Use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and demonstrate a discerning and critical use of other electronic sources of information for historical theology.

Assessment:

Component 1: 50% 15 minute Group Presentation (4-5 in a group) at The Barber Institute of Fine Arts (pass/fail) and 1,500 word individual critical analysis on a Renaissance painting.

Component 2: 50% 4000 word commentary of a key Reformation Text

DISSERTATION IN THEOLOGY


MODULE TITLE : DISSERTATION IN THEOLOGY

MODULE CODE : THU601


MODULE SUMMARY :

This double module promotes the acquisition of in-depth and advanced subject knowledge and understanding, and fosters critical engagement with theological and/or philosophical issues. Building upon their interests and achievements at Levels 4 and 5, students will choose, in negotiation with tutors, a focused area of study within the broad field of Theology and Religious Studies. The dissertation focus may fall within any of the areas covered within the Programme, including Christian Theology, Biblical Studies, Philosophy of Religion, Ethics and Religious Education, but is dependent on the availability of staff expertise and suitable resources as well as student interest. Students will be expected to explore their chosen topic in an independent and original manner, researching widely, developing a systematic understanding of key aspects of their field of study, and clearly demonstrating advanced analytical skills.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 12.00
Independent : 388.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  400.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Foster the development of students’ independent research skills within the area of theological or philosophical studies and/or religious education
  • Promote the acquisition of in-depth and advanced subject knowledge and understanding
  • Develop the students’ ability to sustain a coherent and well-written argument and sustain it throughout a longer piece of work
  • Encourage critical engagement with theological and/or philosophical issues
  • Further develop the students’ analytical skills.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate a sound, accurate and in-depth knowledge and understanding of a specific topic within the broad field of Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies
  • Demonstrate a critical engagement with a range of competing viewpoints in relation to their chosen area of study
  • Develop their skills of analysis and critical evaluation of a range of primary and secondary sources
  • Develop their skills of independent academic research
  • Demonstrate their ability to sustain a well written and coherent argument over the length of a substantial dissertation.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 10% Individual Presentation (10 minutes, plus 5 minutes of questions)

Component 2 - 90% Dissertation (10000 words)

THEOLOGY IN THE MAKING: CONTEXT, METHODS AND CREATIVITY


MODULE TITLE : THEOLOGY IN THE MAKING: CONTEXT, METHODS AND CREATIVITY

MODULE CODE : THU603


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module engages with the ways in which theology is constructed and how the great themes of Christion thought inter-relate and impact on one another. The aim is to develop skills in systematic and synthetic thinking and to provoke creativity in theological engagement with contemporary modes of thinking. The module will open with lectures on the development of theological method from early symbol to the medieval syntheses and on to modern systematics. Then it will examine the theological geography of current postmodernity with its focus on diversity, ambiguity, fragmentation, openness and play. 

Week by week the module will focus on a major theme e.g. Creation, Fall, Redemption, Christology, Trinity, Grace, Ecclesiology, Eschatology etc.  Each theme will be addressed by the tutor in a formal lecture followed by a seminar in which the same theme will be addressed by students who have prepared short 10 minute expositions of key thinkers from different periods on the same theme. The seminar will then identify and explore the issues which would affect any satisfactory statement of the same theme today. Throughout attention will be paid to how developments on one area of thought inevitably effect the development of thought in another e.g. the effect of modern science and of ecological issues on the doctrines of Creation and of theological Anthropology. 

The module aims through the critical exploration of the constructive nature of theological work to relate creatively the various areas of theological knowledge covered in the student’s degree to the contemporary search for meaning and understanding.

 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to develop: 

  • A command of the development of Christian theological method across the classical Medieval and modern periods.
  • An understanding of, and the ability to critically evaluate, a variety of attempts at constructing Christian theology against the backcloth of extra-theological influences, social, political and cultural.
  • The ability to engage with major theological ideas and themes and reveal their inter-connectedness.
  • The ability to share insights and research findings through clear, coherent and short papers.
  • The ability to speak fluently to a topic in public to an audience of peers.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Analyse and evaluate formative theological texts and their influence.
  • Understand and critically evaluate a variety of approaches to interpreting the received tradition.
  • Creatively construct contemporary statements in the light of current critical concerns, in politics, sexuality, gender and culture.
  • Successfully research, explore and synthesise data on the great Christian theological themes.
  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from primary (translated) and secondary sources.
  • Work collaboratively and constructively in seminars.
  • Communicate clearly, coherently and concisely in structured written form.
  • Communicate clearly, concisely, and effectively in fluent speech to peers.
  • Use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for theological research.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 30% Outline of Seminar Paper (1000 words)

Component 2 - 70% Contemporary and Personal Statement (3000 words)

VIRTUES AND VALUES


MODULE TITLE : VIRTUES AND VALUES

MODULE CODE : THU604


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module enables you to explore the ways in which ancient ideas of virtues and values have been reasserted and recast by twentieth and twenty-first century philosophers. By engaging with ancient Greek texts you will have the opportunity to critically assess some of the ethical ideals upheld by this literature, such as Homer’s warrior-hero Achilles, Aeschylus’ tragic hero Agamemnon and Plato’s transcendent Forms. Evaluating the ways in which these accounts of virtue have been fundamental in shaping more modern perceptions of what it means to lead a good life found in, for example, Iris Murdoch’s account of the Good, Jean-Paul Sartre’s existentialist writings, and Martha Nussbaum’s insights about moral luck and tragic dilemmas will encourage you to critique the ideas of justice and good character promoted by our own contemporary culture.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Deepen the students’ understanding of some of the most important ancient Greek thinkers.
  • Foster an awareness of the role of context and culture in the development of ancient Greek thought.
  • Develop the students’ understanding of how some of the key themes and ideas from ancient Greek philosophy have been appropriated and developed by contemporary philosophers.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the thought of key ancient Greek thinkers
  • Analyse and evaluate the influence of Greek ideas on contemporary philosophers
  • Demonstrate a critical appreciation of the role of context and culture in the development of ancient Greek thought
  • Engage confidently with and critique the thought of key ancient Greek and twentieth century philosophers.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Assignment in Negotiated Format (2500 words equivalent)

MYSTICISM EAST AND WEST - optional module


MYSTICISM EAST AND WEST: details currently unavailable

A HOLISTIC APPROACH IN EDUCATION: SMSC - optional module


A HOLISTIC APPROACH IN EDUCATION: SMSC: details currently unavailable

CATHEDRALS AND THE ENGLISH SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS - optional module


CATHEDRALS AND THE ENGLISH SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS: details currently unavailable

THE GOOD, THE TRUE AND THE BEAUTIFUL: QUESTIONS ABOUT METAPHYSICS - optional module


MODULE TITLE : THE GOOD, THE TRUE AND THE BEAUTIFUL: QUESTIONS ABOUT METAPHYSICS

MODULE CODE : THU607


MODULE SUMMARY :

In this module you will be able to engage with some of the most important philosophical thinkers in the Western canon and study how post-modern philosophers have reacted against their ‘modern’ inheritance. Some central philosophical themes will be addressed such as questions about whether mythical stories can contain essential truths and whether truth and knowledge is even possible, through an examination of some contemporary developments in philosophy like death of God theology and noncognitivism. You will be encouraged to explore and develop your own philosophical reaction to developments in post-modern philosophy and appreciate their implications for how we might understand ideas of truth, beauty and goodness today.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Encourage an appreciation of the historical development of philosophical ideas
  • Encourage an engagement with contemporary developments in philosophy
  • Develop the student’s own philosophical perspective with regard to modern and post-modern developments in philosophy
  • Foster an appreciation for the interrelation of philosophical, ethical and aesthetic ideas.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Show a critical knowledge of some of the central philosophers in the Western canon
  • Demonstrate an understanding of some of the central features of post-modern philosophy
  • Show an awareness of the importance of studying historical philosophers for understanding current debates in contemporary and post-modern philosophy
  • Show a critical engagement with key developments in post-modern philosophy
  • Develop a coherent reflective philosophy in response to the philosophers studied.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 30% Critical Analysis of a Key Text (2000 words)

Component 2 - 70% Essay (3000 words)

TEXT, CULTURE AND INTERPRETATION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : TEXT, CULTURE AND INTERPRETATION

MODULE CODE : THU606


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module provides the opportunity for students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the Jewish and Christian bible, and their skills of critically interpreting primary religious texts from a range of interpretational perspectives. A selection of biblical texts will be studied, which represent the major literary genres found within the Bible (e.g.  three or more of prophecy, apocalyptic, wisdom, narrative, poetry, gospels and letters) and which are drawn from both the Old and the New Testament. These will be explored both in relation to their original historical contexts and using the lens of some contemporary hermeneutical and cultural perspectives (e.g. feminist approaches, post-colonial perspectives, literary criticism). Students will be able to reflect critically on the reception history of biblical texts (e.g. in literature and art, and the reuse within the bible itself of older written and oral traditions), on their use in current ethical debates (e.g. around the equality of women or attitudes to homosexuality), and on the issues surrounding the task of bible translation. They will be able to pursue a particular area of interest in the field by negotiating with tutors a focus for an individual research project.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Deepen the students’ knowledge and understanding of the theological sub-discipline of biblical studies
  • Develop the students’ ability to analyse from a variety of hermeneutical perspectives the primary religious texts of the Jewish and Christian bible
  • Foster an appreciation of the connections between biblical texts and the reuse within the bible of older traditions
  • Develop the students’ ability to critically evaluate the use of the bible in contemporary cultural and ethical debates

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

  • Demonstrate a wide-ranging knowledge and critical understanding of a range of biblical texts and genres
  • Critically analyse biblical texts from a range of hermeneutical perspectives
  • Evaluate the interaction between biblical texts and wider societal, cultural, ethical and literary issues
  • Demonstrate an appreciation of the complexity of religious language and experience as captured in the sacred texts of Judaism and Christianity
  • Develop their skills of independent learning and research
  • Demonstrate their fluency and skills in academic writing appropriate for Level 6
  • Pursue a particular area of interest in the field of biblical studies through an individual, negotiated project

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Individual Research Project (5000 words)

Course code


1V71

Applications for full-time courses are made through UCAS.

Applications for flexible learning courses are made via Newman.

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For all enquiries relating to admissions or entry requirements, email us at admissions@newman.ac.uk

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