Theology and Education BA (Hons)

Course length: 3 years full-time, 4.5 years part-time (for further information on part-time course combinations available click here)

Overview

Why study Theology and Education Studies?

Newman University has an excellent reputation in both Theology and Education, and this combination remains very popular with students. Both subjects deal with philosophical questions and issues of great relevance to individuals and contemporary society.

Theology is of great importance for understanding the world in which we live and it covers a wide range of areas including history, literature, politics, sociology and anthropology. The course will extend your understanding of religion and culture, and encourage you to think about deep questions such as how human beings should live and what values you want to promote in society.  Almost every story covered in the media has an ethical, philosophical or religious dimension to it, so that theology is always relevant to the issues of today.

Education at Newman is concerned  with how individuals learn, in both formal and informal educational contexts. The course is designed to give you a rounded understanding of the broad field of education through an interdisciplinary study of the philosophy, psychology and sociology of education. You will have the opportunity to consider education and equality, special educational needs, creativity in education and the impact of new technologies on education.

What does the course cover?

This course offers you the opportunity to study all the key areas of the wide subject of theology, including: Christian theology, both classical and modern; ethical theories and issues; biblical interpretation; and how different religions interact with society. In exploring contemporary educational issues, Education Studies offers an excellent basis for postgraduate teacher training. It is not, however, restricted exclusively to ‘school–based’ issues, and students will work across a range of themes such a social justice, globalisation and sustainability, and management of change. There are also optional modules available in religious education for  those who are aiming for a future career in RE teaching.

What makes this course noteworthy?

The Theology and Education tutors at Newman are all well-qualified and experienced lecturers, and the departments have gained an excellent reputation for quality of teaching and support of students.  The course tutors employ an interactive and student-centred teaching style to develop the whole individual as a person. Field trips to places of worship and other sites of interest are organised annually by the Theology department.

A key feature of our undergraduate degrees at Newman is a compulsory work-related module (taken in the UK or overseas) which will not only provide you with valuable experience of work within an area you may be considering for a career and develop your general employability skills, but is a key asset when applying for jobs.

How will I be assessed?

The course uses a variety of assessments to help develop a range of different skills from traditional essay and report writing to oral presentations, analysis tasks, textual commentaries, case studies, portfolios, web design, reflective logs and research projects. 

What careers can I consider after this degree?

Many graduates of this course will want to pursue a career in teaching or another educational context, and the course provides an excellent basis for postgraduate teacher training. However, the programme covers a broad range of subjects, promotes  cultural and religious understanding, and develops skills valued by many employers, such as critical thinking, evaluation (of sources of information) and communication. Many students will therefore progress to jobs in related fields such as youth work, community work, training and development or employment within the charities and voluntary sector, or move into local government, the civil service, human resources departments, libraries, the NHS and the police service.


Newman University would like to draw your attention to our Academic Regulations. These regulations are your Terms of Reference and should be considered when making a decision to study with our institution.

Entry requirements

September 2018 Entry Requirements

You must achieve either at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma), or a total of 88 points from a maximum of 3 A levels.

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9 M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

5 GCSEs at grade C or above including English or a recognised equivalent, are also required.

If your Work Placement module in Year 2 involves working with children or vulnerable adults, you may be required to obtain a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance.

Fees

Fees per academic year: 2018/19 

Full-time UK/EU Students: £9,250*

Part-time UK/EU Students: £4,950*

* NB: 2019/20 tuition fees may rise in line with inflation

Finance and Scholarship information

Additional costs:

A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is not required for entry into this programme, although it is in many cases required by employers before students can begin their Year 2 (level 5) work placement.  The cost of the DBS is currently £55 (including processing fee) with the option of subscribing to the update service which is currently £13 per year.  For more information on your DBS application please click here.

As a full time student, you will study a total of 120 credits each year. Credits are made up of mandatory modules and you may have a list of optional modules to choose from. Not every programme offers optional modules and when an optional module is available it will be clearly marked. All modules are listed below and you may not be required to complete all of these modules. Most modules are 20 credits and dissertations are 40 credits. Please note that not all optional modules run every year. For further information please email admissions@newman.ac.uk.

Year 1 modules


INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION STUDIES: EDUCATION AND SOCIETY


INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION STUDIES: EDUCATION AND SOCIETY: details currently unavailable

DOING THEORY ON EDUCATION: DEVELOPING A CRITICAL APPROACH


MODULE TITLE : DOING THEORY ON EDUCATION: DEVELOPING A CRITICAL APPROACH

MODULE CODE : ESU402


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module is designed to help students develop a critical approach to the theorisation of Education as a field of undergraduate study. It is intended that the phasing of this module will follow the completion of semester 1 course work and assignment feedback; thus offering formative advice and strategies for improving their reading, writing and  theorisation of Educational issues.  The module aims to help students make the familiar unfamiliar through further reflection on: their own educational experiences, their reading of key educational texts, and their approach to articulating ideas about education in written and oral form.  The module then aims to support students through the anxiety-provoking experience of ‘troublesome knowledge’ while encouraging them to explore and question contested educational ideas. 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

The aims of this module are to enable students to:

  • Develop a critical perspective on educational ideas
  • Articulate evolving educational arguments in written and oral form
  • Evaluate and reflect upon assignment feedback and their own approach to writing and presentation
  • Question and corroborate previously held convictions through exposure to educational ideas and research.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have opportunities to:

  • Discuss educational ideas and approaches with reference to educational literature and published research 
  • Demonstrate an evolving approach to educational critique, argument and stance.
  • Share preferred approaches to undergraduate study
  • Evaluate educational ideas and practices in the context of personal experience, value positions, and ‘troublesome knowledge’
  • Develop a theoretical approach to the study of education.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Portfolio

INTRODUCTION TO LEARNING AND TEACHING


MODULE TITLE : INTRODUCTION TO LEARNING AND TEACHING

MODULE CODE : ESU404


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module complements and develops some of the concepts which students will have been introduced to and engaged with in ESU401 (L4-1) Introduction to Education Studies: Education and Society.

The module aims to enhance students’ understanding of a range of factors that impact upon learning and teaching to further student evaluation of contextual factors surrounding diversity in the learning and teaching experience.  The module will enable students to explore educational practice at various levels and encourage students to reflect on their own learning in order to explore the ways in which values and beliefs impact on decisions about how learning is organised, what we learn and why.

Students will be invited to interrogate a variety of differing learning experiences and engage in evaluation of these with reference to issues of equity, diversity and social justice.  Students will be encouraged to reflect on their own learning experiences with reference to critical evaluation of theoretical perspectives, reading and research and to further understanding of concepts such as education, schooling, identities, learner/teacher roles, educational values and beliefs. 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Enable students to understand theoretical contributions to understanding the nature and processes of learning and their relevance educational practice
  • Develop students as active learners by enhancing their reflection on the impact of contextual features of the learning and teaching experience.
  • Enable students to understand how differing values and perspectives influence learning and educational experiences within various settings.
  • Enable students to draw upon a wide range of sources and theoretical perspectives to explore differing contexts for learning and teaching

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had a range of opportunities to begin processes of:

  • Understanding the range of values and beliefs that impact upon the organisation of learning and teaching in differing contexts
  • Evaluating the effects of differing learning and teaching contexts on individual learning.
  • Analysing how concepts and theories on learning and teaching relate to interpretations in educational practice.
  • Evaluating a range of literature and other sources to interrogate educational ideas on learning and teaching and how these influence policy and practice.
  • Developing their own research, critical analysis and writing skills.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% 2500 WORD WRITTEN REPORT

INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING


MODULE TITLE : INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING

MODULE CODE : PLU404


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module aims to equip students with the knowledge and self-management skills to make informed choices in preparing for work placement and the transition to employment or further study on graduation.  

Learners will be provided with the opportunities to develop awareness of the workplace, identify different career and study options, recognise and articulate their own experience, accomplishments and talents and plan and implement career management strategies for the short and long term.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 12.00
Independent : 88.00
Placement :
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Support students in developing informed choices about the career pathways available to them, in relation to their subject choices.
  • Prepare students for work-based learning and the application / exploration of subject knowledge in the workplace.

  • Encourage students to make connections between their learning, placement choice, future job aspirations and contribution to society.

  • Enable students to build confidence in securing work placements and future employment.

  • Support students in reflecting upon their preparation for their work placement and future employment.  

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

  1. Examine how their experiences, accomplishments, and abilities relate to employer expectations.

  2. Demonstrate engagement with, and an understanding of, graduate employment pathways and employability issues relating to their own career aspirations.

  3. Research organisations for the purposes of securing a work placement.

  4. Reflect upon their learning and development.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Reflective Essay and Appendix, 2000 words

METHODS IN THEOLOGICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDY


MODULE TITLE : METHODS IN THEOLOGICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDY

MODULE CODE : THU401


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module is a core part of students’ programme, which aims to support them in the transition into Higher Education and prepare them to succeed in their theological and philosophical studies. It provides the opportunity and time for students to acquire and/or develop the academic study skills, both general and subject-specific, on which they will need to draw throughout their course, and also introduces them to key aspects of subject knowledge.  The module will cover areas such as library and research skills; bibliographic referencing; academic writing; critical reading; summarizing and evaluating sources; and theological reflection. These skills will be practised and reinforced in weekly seminars. A substantial portion of contact time in seminars will also be devoted to engaging the students in the reading and analysis of primary theological and philosophical texts.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 40.00
Independent : 160.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • introduce students to the conventions of academic referencing
  • develop the students’ ability to undertake research in theology and philosophy
  • develop the students’ study skills and academic writing skills
  • develop the students’ skills in theological reflection
  • foster group identity and cohesion through e.g. seminars and on-lien discussion fora
  • promote the value and skills of independent learning
  • enable students to gain knowledge and understanding of introductory concepts in Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • gain a knowledge and understanding of introductory concepts in Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies
  • debate theological, philosophical and ethical issues from an informed range of perspectives
  • demonstrate their ability to engage with a range of primary theological and philosophical texts
  • develop a range of study skills to help prepare them for further successful study (e.g. ICT skills, library and research skills, referencing skills, and skills of academic writing)
  • develop as an independent and reflective learner.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 30% Portfolio of Study Skills Exercises (1000 words or equivalent)

Component 2 - 70% Portfolio of Theological Tasks (3000 words or equivalent)

THEOLOGY: THE CLASSICAL TRADITION


MODULE TITLE : THEOLOGY: THE CLASSICAL TRADITION

MODULE CODE : THU404


MODULE SUMMARY :

Christian Theology explores big questions about what it means to be human and about the relationship between human beings and God. In this module we will engage with these questions as we study key theological thinkers from the first millennium of Christianity. In each teaching session we will encounter a new theologian and gain first-hand knowledge of the most important texts in the Christian tradition. 

As we study the writings of these theologians we will see how they state the big theological questions and how they try to answer them. By the end of the module we will understand why Christian theology has taken the shape it has. Each teaching session will help us develop the skills and knowledge necessary to engage with theological writings and the module concludes by asking the student to write a critical appraisal of the thinking of a great theologian on a major theme from the Christian theological tradition.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 33.00
Independent : 167.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop an understanding of various theologians in the classical tradition.
  • Foster an appreciation for how Christian theology has developed within a particular social and cultural context.
  • Encourage an awareness of the contribution of Classical theology to contemporary theology.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Describe and analyse the way that Classical Christian Theology was shaped by its social and cultural context
  • Outline and evaluate the development of Christian theology, focussing on a number of different case studies and recognising differences in doctrine, canon etc.
  • Read, discuss and compare primary and secondary material related to Classical Christian Theology, analysing their language and evaluating their utility in understanding the development of Christian Theology
  • Identify key ethical issues in the practice of theology and philosophy and develop theoretical understandings of theological practice that are applicable outside the classroom
  • Work together to debate and develop ideas about Christian Theology, communicating fluently in both written and oral form.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Reading of Seminar Text (1000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Essay (1500 words)

READING SACRED TEXTS: THE JEWISH AND CHRISTIAN BIBLE


MODULE TITLE : READING SACRED TEXTS: THE JEWISH AND CHRISTIAN BIBLE

MODULE CODE : THU406


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module provides students with an introduction to the sub-discipline of Biblical Studies. Consideration will be given to some of the general critical issues which relate to the subject of reading sacred texts (e.g. translation, competing interpretations, and truth and authority claims). The main focus of the module will be on the specific contents of the Jewish and Christian Bible. Students will be introduced to the historical background, literary genres and major themes of the books of the Bible, and to important contemporary critical approaches to interpreting them (e.g. feminist and contextual approaches). Great emphasis will be placed on developing the students’ skills and confidence in reading and analysing the primary texts. A selection of passages from both Testaments will therefore be studied in detail, and the module will make use of an innovative series of podcasts explaining key aspects of biblical criticism, which were produced by Newman staff and students in 2012-13 as part of an HEA-funded project into innovative teaching methods in Biblical Studies.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Introduce students to key elements of subject knowledge and understanding in relation to the contents and major themes of the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament.
  • Introduce the students to the varied historical, geographical, literary and theological contexts of the books of the Jewish and Christian Bible, and to the impact these factors have on an informed understanding of the texts.
  • Encourage students to explore a variety of methods of reading and interpreting biblical texts, including feminist and contextual critical approaches.
  • Foster in students a sensitivity to the complexities involved in reading sacred texts in a variety of traditions (e.g. translation difficulties and truth claims).

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Acquire at least a basic knowledge and understanding of the contents, genres and themes present within the Jewish and Christian Bible.
  • Develop their sensitivity to the complexity of religious language and experience as captured in the sacred texts of some of the world’s major religions.
  • Develop their skills of independent learning and research.
  • Demonstrate their ability to engage critically with the primary religious texts contained within the Jewish and Christian Bible.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of key critical approaches in contemporary Biblical Studies (e.g. Feminist Biblical Criticism).
  • Write an informed biblical commentary on one or more set texts.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Commentaries on Two Set Texts (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

Year 2 modules


WORK PLACEMENT


MODULE TITLE : WORK PLACEMENT

MODULE CODE : PLU502


MODULE SUMMARY :

This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 10.00
Independent : 90.00
Placement : 100.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement in a workplace setting.

  • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement and of their independent learning throughout the experience.

  • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.

  • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.

  • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to: 

  1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.

  2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.

  3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.

  4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - % PLACEMENT REGISTRATION FORM

Component 2 - 60% WORK PLACEMENT REFLECTION (2500 WORDS)

Component 3 - 40% WORK PLACEMENT EVALUATION: DIGITAL RESOURCE (1500 WORDS EQUIVALENT)

THEOLOGY IN THE SECOND MILLENNIUM: ENGAGING WITH PARADIGM SHIFTS - optional module


MODULE TITLE : THEOLOGY IN THE SECOND MILLENNIUM: ENGAGING WITH PARADIGM SHIFTS

MODULE CODE : THU500


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will focus on major paradigm shifts in theology throughout the second millennium. It starts with the wisdom traditions of Monasticism and the shift to Scholastic Theology and Philosophy of the medieval universities. Then it engages the shift through Nominalism which leads into the thinking of the Reformers and the emergence of a recognisable Protestant Paradigm. The effect of the rise of science and the turn to the subject in the Enlightenment will be explored in the movement of liberal theology in Germany and France. The renewal of critical historical studies in the 19th century and their effect on e.g. Biblical Studies, Patristics, Church History and Systematics will then be explored; concluding with the emergence of Christianity as a post-colonial global religion within a polycentric world and the challenges this has brought to theology as a discipline. 

The focus of the course will be on movements and paradigm shifts rather than individual thinkers. Each taught session will be complemented by a critical reading seminar in which primary sources will be engaged by voices from modern and contemporary critical approaches e.g. contextual, post-colonialist, Marxist, and feminist, etc. Seminars will extend the ways in which students critically engage with the key theological and philosophical movements of the second millennium. 

The module aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills foundational to success in the rest of the programme and to provide an opportunity to develop skills of collaborative research work and to experience the process of refining ideas that is part of the research experience.

 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Engage critically with the theological shifts across the second millennium.
  • Develop an understanding of the extra-theological influences that provoke paradigm shifts.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Analyse and assess the formative philosophical, social and cultural influences that shaped the medieval and modern theological perspectives.
  • Explore in depth significant theological paradigm shifts.
  • Develop a sense of the different vocabularies and conceptual frameworks of theologies in conflict.
  • Read, discuss and compare primary and secondary material from the second millennium, analysing and evaluating its significance in the development of Christian Theology.
  • Identify key social and political implications of shifts in theology and the ethical issues they provoked e.g. Crusades, the Inquisition, religious intolerance.
  • Debate and reflect in seminar on the on-going influence of key figures and ideas e.g. Aquinas, Luther, Schleiermacher.
  • Research, write, and deliver concise oral, visual and written expository pieces.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Annotated Bibliography (750 words)

Component 2 - 60% Group Poster Presentation (Equivalence, 1000 words)

DEVELOPING THEOLOGICAL RESEARCH AND WRITING - optional module


MODULE TITLE : DEVELOPING THEOLOGICAL RESEARCH AND WRITING

MODULE CODE : THU520


MODULE SUMMARY :

A key feature of the module is the way it equips students with the knowledge and skills foundational to success in the rest of the program and prepares them for the requirements of dissertation level research. This is achieved through critical reading seminars and workshops and an assessment portfolio which will include an individual critical reflection applying one or more critical methods (1000 words), the preparation of a 500 word proposal for a co-authored conference paper, and the development of an initial research proposal for the final year dissertation.

By exploring the methods of theological research and writing, the module aims to develop students’ ability to apply a number of critical approaches, e.g. post-colonialism, post-structuralism, Marxism, feminism, to theological issues and movements.  This is intended to help students recognize and practice models of research, academic writing and presentation and to provide an opportunity to develop skills of collaborative research work so as to experience the process of refining ideas that is part of the research experience.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Engage critically with the process of theological research and writing.
  • Explore a range of contemporary critical frameworks valuable for theological research.
  • Develop advanced critical reading approaches to foundational texts from a variety of modern and contemporary approaches.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Develop a sense of the different vocabularies and conceptual frameworks of theology today.
  • Read, discuss and compare primary and secondary material and evaluate its significance in the development of theology.
  • Identify key social and political dimensions of theological discourse.
  • Research, write, and deliver concise written expository pieces including the preparation of an initial research proposal for the final year dissertation.
  • Gain a detailed knowledge of a range of contemporary critical approaches to theological writing.
  • Apply a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of texts.
  • Develop their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation.
  • Present cogent and persuasive arguments, orally and in writing, which are appropriately informed by theoretical approaches.
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these to create work that is coherently structured.
  • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesize such material.
  • Develop their productivity by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organize their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Portfolio of Short Theological Related Tasks (approximately 1800 words)

CRITICAL ENQUIRIES: EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND PRACTICE - optional module


CRITICAL ENQUIRIES: EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND PRACTICE: details currently unavailable

CRITICAL ENQUIRIES: EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : CRITICAL ENQUIRIES: EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

MODULE CODE : ESU520


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will enable students to develop understanding, skills and knowledge to aid progression into research at undergraduate dissertation level.  Students will be introduced to the knowledge and understanding necessary for the design of a written research proposal and further develop skills appropriate for the development of a research proposal including literature evaluation, research planning, research governance and academic writing.

The sessions aim to further develop an awareness of appropriate research methodologies and methods in relation to the research proposal including understanding of data and information collection techniques of observation, interviews, focus groups, survey design and use of secondary data. Management, analysis, interpretation and presentation of data will be explored in the context of ethical codes and practices.

 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Enable students to understand the difference between different methodological approaches in educational research and their broad philosophical and ideological standpoints;
  • Introduce students to different research methods and discuss their relative merits and suitability for identified research problems in order to understand the basic principles of effective research design;
  • Introduce students to the ethical practice in educational research and required codes of conduct.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Identify appropriate environments, problems, questions and approaches for educational research and ways of accessing evidence related to educational research;
  • Use and demonstrate knowledge about different kinds of educational research methods and designs, and the kinds of research questions for which they are appropriate to;
  • Understand what research ethics are and how to ensure that ethical considerations are in place when conducting research;
  • Plan and present a written research proposal demonstrating an awareness and understanding of ethical and equal opportunities issues involved in research design.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Written Research Proposal (1500 words)

THE ABRAHAMIC INHERITANCE: CHRISTIANITY, ISLAM AND JUDAISM - optional module


MODULE TITLE : THE ABRAHAMIC INHERITANCE: CHRISTIANITY, ISLAM AND JUDAISM

MODULE CODE : THU503


MODULE SUMMARY :

The story of Abraham has influenced theologians both ancient and modern, as well as painters, sculptors and musicians. In this module we’ll explore this influence and think about what it means in the twenty-first century. Beginning from the canonical accounts of Abraham’s life contained in Genesis and in the Qur’an, you will uncover the different ways that memories of Abraham have shaped the past and continue to shape the present. As you do so you will return to key terms that are often used in the study of theology and religions. Words like ‘monotheism’, ‘scripture’ and ‘tradition’ will take on new meanings for you. To reflect the diversity of Abraham’s influence the module offers you an opportunity to develop your own creative response to the Abrahamic inheritance.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Extend the students’ knowledge and understanding of Christianity, Islam and Judaism.
  • Introduce the students to the varied ways in which the story of Abraham has been received and re-articulated in different religious and social contexts.
  • Encourage students to discuss and evaluate the way that the Abrahamic story is rearticulated to express particular social or cultural questions.
  • Develop in students a sensitivity to the nature of primary and secondary source material in order to prepare them for further advanced study of religion and theology.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Describe the relationship between beliefs, practices, traditions, texts and history of three of the world’s major religions
  • Analyse the relationship between religions and wider culture and society, constructing and creating a response to this relationship
  • Demonstrate that the Abrahamic inheritance is shaped by diverse and competing ways of remembering Abraham and evaluate how the story of Abraham has been used by different groups at different times in history
  • Interpret, debate and assess religious texts from a variety of religious traditions and standpoints, situating them in wider social, cultural and ethical changes
  • Compose written and spoken English in order to explain and debate knowledge of the subject
  • Collect and catalogue research material relevant to their assessment, using ICT skills
  • Work with others and by oneself in order to prepare a creative response to the Abrahamic inheritance, reflecting on their own learning as they do so.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Portfolio (2500 words or equivalent)

ISSUES IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : ISSUES IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION

MODULE CODE : THU504


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module aims to develop the knowledge & understanding for those students with a particular interest for RE in schools through identifying both established and potential issues for the subject as part of the statutory curriculum within England. The module will examine research into some of the main factors influencing the delivery of RE in schools today and the impact this has on pupil understanding. It will also look at the future of RE and the effect some of these issues may have in the way the subject develops. By having a thorough knowledge on the subject area and the challenges facing it the students will be well equipped for any future careers involving Religious Education as well as developing a range of transferable skills.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Develop a thorough understanding of the position of RE in schools and the way in which the subject is delivered;

  • Evaluate particular issues regarding the delivery of RE in the classroom

  • Critically reflect on the potential for current issues to affect the future development of the subject

  • Develop research skills through exploration of key issues in the delivery of RE in the primary school

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of their understanding of the current position of RE in schools          

  • Identify and evaluate the main factors and challenges affecting the subject today

  • Effectively research a key issue in RE

  • Discuss issues from a range of viewpoints, demonstrating sensitivity to the different parties involved and an awareness of the complexity of the field

  • Analyse appropriate research and documents in relation to issues in RE

  • Apply findings from research into issues in RE and suggest possible ways in which these could be addressed in school and beyond

  • Demonstrate in written and verbal communication a clear, logical, structured and well-researched approach to the issues

  • During group discussions display an awareness of differing views and sensitivity to different opinions

  • Critically evaluate their own understanding and approaches to issues in RE and identify areas for improvement

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Self Evaluation/Reflection (1000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Research Project (3000 words)

ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ETHICS - optional module


MODULE TITLE : ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ETHICS

MODULE CODE : THU507


MODULE SUMMARY :

Taking this module will enable you to examine some of the most pressing ethical debates of our age from human cloning and genetic modification to capital punishment and overseas military intervention. You will be encouraged to assess the arguments for and against different ethical positions, while developing an appreciation for the underlying philosophical issues like autonomy and choice, the value of human and non-human life, and the purpose of modern medicine.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop an understanding of some of the key debates in applied ethics.
  • Foster an awareness of the underlying philosophical and theological assumptions behind these debates.
  • Develop the student’s knowledge of the major ethical theories and their application.
  • Develop the student’s own carefully evaluated ethical standpoint.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate a competent knowledge of the major theories of ethics
  • Show an understanding of the philosophical issues that underlie many debates in contemporary ethics
  • Analyse the central arguments that surround several controversial issues in contemporary ethics and the different positions of leading thinkers
  • Engage confidently and critically with some of the key contemporary thinkers in applied ethics
  • Critically evaluate how the main theories of ethics have been applied to some contemporary issues
  • Present their understanding in a logical fashion, demonstrating an awareness of the complexities represented in applying theory to praxis.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Participation in Consultation/Online Petition and Rationale (2500 words) or Short Letter and Essay (2500 words)

HERETICS AND RADICALS - optional module


MODULE TITLE : HERETICS AND RADICALS

MODULE CODE : THU508


MODULE SUMMARY :

From the monks of the ancient Egyptian deserts to the radical feminist critiques of the twenty-first century, the most innovative and exciting theological and philosophical thought has come not from the mainstream but from the edges. In this module you will discover and analyse ideas that have challenged and resisted accepted models of God and humanity. The module will encourage you to discuss and re-evaluate questions fundamental to human experience. Drawing on material from early Christianity and contemporary radical thought you will evaluate the way that theology is subverted and renewed by people who refuse to subscribe to accepted belief.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 33.00
Independent : 167.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop an understanding of various radical and heretical thinkers
  • Foster an appreciation for how radical and heretical thought has developed within a particular social and cultural context
  • Encourage an awareness of the contribution of radical and heretical thought to contemporary theology.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Describe and analyse the way that culture, society and politics challenge and shape theological thought.
  • Outline and evaluate the influence that radical and heretical thought has had on Christian theology, focussing on a number of different case studies and recognising competing claims about what is ‘correct belief.’
  • Read, discuss and compare primary and secondary material related to radical and heretical theologies, analysing their language and evaluating their benefit to the practice of theology.
  • Identify key ethical issues in the practice of theology and philosophy and develop theoretical understandings of theological practice that are applicable outside the classroom.
  • Work together to debate and develop your ideas about radical and heretical theologies, communicating in both written and oral form.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Portfolio of Tasks and Reflections (2000 words or equivalent)

Component 2 - 60% Essay (2000 words)

DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

MODULE CODE : ESU503


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module introduces students to and expands their knowledge of key theories and concepts within developmental, child and educational psychology. Utilising a bio-psycho-social stance, the module emphasizes normative perspectives on human growth and learning, with a predominant focus on that of children and young people. Against this foundation, consideration will be given to ways in which development and learning may be inhibited, derailed, varied and promoted by family, social and cultural influences as well as practitioner interventions. Emphasis is placed on interdisciplinary perspectives that contribute to critically understanding both these processes and the contested nature of the subject. The module aims to offer possibilities to link theory, research and practice with insights drawn from students’ own lived experience, thus fostering deeper integrative learning opportunities. Particular focus will be placed upon explaining ideas, themes and contemporary issues that inform critical study within this area, which, in turn, will serve to provide a platform for progressive study across all levels of the award.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Introduce selected key theories and concepts within developmental, child and educational psychology
  • Emphasise normative perspectives on human growth and learning, with a predominant focus on that of children and young people
  • Consider ways in which development and learning may be inhibited and promoted by a range of influences
  • Consolidate students understanding of these concepts and processes with teaching examples, readings, and personal reflection
  • Establish foundational academic knowledge for both the specific topic area and broader interdisciplinary collaboration
  • Support students in developing new perspectives and understanding of their own developmental and learning formation and that of others
  • Consider the role of values and ethics on policy and practice
  • Develop students as active learners and researchers

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate an understanding of core academic and professional concepts both within developmental, child and educational psychology and in relation to other disciplinary domains
  • Critically reflect on normative perspectives on growth and learning, particularly among children and young people, and approaches to influencing these processes
  • Consider the ways in which professional practices in these areas have developed through a matrix of socio-political, economic, scientific, academic and individual drivers
  • Consider practitioner decision making and judgement within these areas in the light of wider societal value systems      
  • Question – using theory and data – dominant approaches to professional practices
  • Reflect on their own values and on-going formative experience in light of contested concepts and ideas
  • Develop their own research, critical analysis and writing skills

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Structured Literature Review (3000 words)

EDUCATION SYSTEMS AND SOCIAL CHANGE - optional module


EDUCATION SYSTEMS AND SOCIAL CHANGE: details currently unavailable

DIGITAL CHILDHOODS - optional module


MODULE TITLE : DIGITAL CHILDHOODS

MODULE CODE : ESU508


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module considers the increasing role that digital media is playing in young people’s lives, and the implications of this for their development, education and well-being. Drawing on research, policy and contemporary thinking, students will explore both empowerment and protectionist discourses, as well as young people’s uses of and attitudes to technology. The module will consider e-safety issues and conditions for promoting digital literacy.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Outline contemporary debates around young peoples’ use of technology;
  • Explore the role of technology in society and related issues;
  • Enable students to understand the personal, social and educational implications of digital media use;
  • Help students consider issues of online behaviour and associated structure and agency;
  • Consider the ways in which digital literacies are promoted in schools;
  • Help students consider the ways that e-safety policies are implemented in different settings;
  • Promote students’ understanding of their own use of technology through discussion, debate and evaluation.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary thinking and practice around young people’s use of technology;         
  • Recognise that young people’s use of digital media are subject to a range of interpretations and competing agendas;
  • Consider ways in which young people’s use of digital media can be evaluated and understood;
  • Critically evaluate competing (and evolving) digital media policies;
  • Negotiate the selection of material for a public presentation;
  • Identify, select and synthesise appropriate literature, research data and materials for presentation;
  • Structure ideas and outcomes for an oral presentation.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Paired Presentation (20 minutes)

CREATIVE LEARNING - optional module


MODULE TITLE : CREATIVE LEARNING

MODULE CODE : ESU505


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module considers the function of creativity and imagination in educational practice. Drawing on contemporary thinking, research, and inspection evidence, students will explore the different ways in which creativity has been defined and conceptualised and the relationship of imagination to the creative process. The module will consider the attributes of creative and imaginative practice and the environments and conditions for promoting imagination and creativity.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Outline contemporary thinking, research and practice in creative and imaginative education
  • Enable students to understand some of the characteristics, traits and conditions that are typically associated with creative behaviour and practice
  • Consider the ways in which creativity can be considered as a culturally specific practice
  • Help students consider ways in which the outcomes of imaginative and creative work can be evaluated
  • Promote students’ understanding of their own creative and imaginative processes, and those of others, through discussion and evaluation.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary thinking and practice in creative and imaginative education
  • Describe and critically evaluate characteristics, traits and conditions associated with creative and imaginative behaviour and practice
  • Recognise that creative and imaginative practices are subject to different interpretations depending upon cultural and historical contexts
  • Consider ways in which the outcomes of imaginative and creative work can be evaluated
  • Structure ideas and outcomes for an oral presentation
  • Negotiate the selection of material for a public presentation
  • Identify, select and synthesise appropriate literature, research data and materials for presentation
  • Critically evaluate competing definitions of creativity and imagination, and ideas and approaches to its development.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Paired Presentation in an Alternative Setting (15 minutes)

EDUCATIONAL POSSIBILITIES - optional module


MODULE TITLE : EDUCATIONAL POSSIBILITIES

MODULE CODE : ESU506


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module does education differently, both in terms of what we study as well as how we do it. Whereas other modules in education studies educate about education largely from a critical perspective on schools and societies, this module rips up the school and even society as we hegemonically know it. We look at, consider and discuss alternatives. The purpose of the explorations we undertake together are to know education afresh and differently. Examples of schools and a wide variety of out of school educational practice from around the world are considered. Our focus is on education with autonomy, self-direction, freedom not license, voice, community, destructured, unschooled, deschooled, home-led versions and other legal options. We will be dealing with practices within and outside the mainstream. The module has a strong focus on ideas, theories, philosophies and possibilities set within an awareness of the limitations the modern world imposes on any and all approaches which challenge ‘normality’.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Advance and critically discuss philosophical and ideological traditions pertinent to the study of education

  • Distinguish significant differences between competing conceptions of broad educational purpose and critically discuss these in light of relevant literature and personal experience

  • Draw distinction between philosophies, ideologies of education and ideas about education

  • Enable students to discuss and critically evaluate different conceptions of education in the context of the above and how these inform the shaping of educational policy, provision and practice

  • Enable students to articulate a provisional and personal philosophy of education that is informed through the above

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Know the defining features of some of the philosophies and ideologies that shape conceptions of education and educational practice

  • Have a knowledge of the philosophical and ideological traditions pertinent to the study of education and distinguish the significant differences between competing conceptions of educational purpose

  • Know that practice, provision and policy in education is situationally defined and governed by a range of external contexts and forces

  • Have an evolving personal philosophy of education that is informed by relevant , reading, research interrogation, pair and group discussion

  • Locate and distinguish some of the competing philosophies and ideologies of education

  • Identify that ways in which such philosophies and ideologies have shaped practice, provision and policy in education

  • Describe how philosophies, ideologies and ideas about education are different

  • Articulate their own personal, provisional and developing philosophy of education in written and oral form

  • Develop their capacity for critical reflection and questioning.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Prospectus and Commentary (3500 words)

Year 3 modules


DISSERTATION IN THEOLOGY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : DISSERTATION IN THEOLOGY

MODULE CODE : THU601


MODULE SUMMARY :

This double module promotes the acquisition of in-depth and advanced subject knowledge and understanding, and fosters critical engagement with theological and/or philosophical issues. Building upon their interests and achievements at Levels 4 and 5, students will choose, in negotiation with tutors, a focused area of study within the broad field of Theology and Religious Studies. The dissertation focus may fall within any of the areas covered within the Programme, including Christian Theology, Biblical Studies, Philosophy of Religion, Ethics and Religious Education, but is dependent on the availability of staff expertise and suitable resources as well as student interest. Students will be expected to explore their chosen topic in an independent and original manner, researching widely, developing a systematic understanding of key aspects of their field of study, and clearly demonstrating advanced analytical skills.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 12.00
Independent : 388.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  400.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Foster the development of students’ independent research skills within the area of theological or philosophical studies and/or religious education
  • Promote the acquisition of in-depth and advanced subject knowledge and understanding
  • Develop the students’ ability to sustain a coherent and well-written argument and sustain it throughout a longer piece of work
  • Encourage critical engagement with theological and/or philosophical issues
  • Further develop the students’ analytical skills.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate a sound, accurate and in-depth knowledge and understanding of a specific topic within the broad field of Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies
  • Demonstrate a critical engagement with a range of competing viewpoints in relation to their chosen area of study
  • Develop their skills of analysis and critical evaluation of a range of primary and secondary sources
  • Develop their skills of independent academic research
  • Demonstrate their ability to sustain a well written and coherent argument over the length of a substantial dissertation.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 10% Individual Presentation (10 minutes, plus 5 minutes of questions)

Component 2 - 90% Dissertation (10000 words)

DISSERTATION IN EDUCATION - optional module


DISSERTATION IN EDUCATION: details currently unavailable

NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT - optional module


MODULE TITLE : NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT

MODULE CODE : PLU601


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module offers students the opportunity to build on their level 5 work placement through the more developed application of a negotiated work-based research project. Students will agree with their placement tutor and workplace mentor a brief for a project which addresses a need within the organisation. Learners should complete a minimum of 100 hours in the work place. It is in the spirit of this module that wherever possible, the focus will be on social or community / sustainable development.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 276.00
Placement : 100.00
Total :  400.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Enable students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing a negotiated work-based research project

  • Encourage students to use appropriate work-based research methods

  • Enable students to work collaboratively in a work setting, establishing continuity from their previous work placement and offering tangible evidence of building on this prior experience, where possible

  • Generate confidence and security in students’ employability on graduation

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Secure, negotiate and design a work-based research project

  • Develop an understanding of, and apply, research methods that are appropriate to work-based contexts

  • Interpret gathered information

  • Make a clear and productive contribution to the organization through the development of recommendations arising from the work-based research project

  • Present a creatively engaging argument

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT (8000 WORDS)

EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY - optional module


EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY: details currently unavailable

POLITICS OF EDUCATION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : POLITICS OF EDUCATION

MODULE CODE : ESU607


MODULE SUMMARY :

The module builds upon the understanding of sociological approaches to educational analysis introduced and developed at Level 4 and Level 5. It is designed to build on a range of knowledge, understanding and skills, in order to facilitate further understanding of the inter-relationships between education and political ideologies - within macro, meso and micro contexts. The overall purpose of the module is to enable students to question and analyse ‘common sense’ assumptions of policy and practice by investigating current and historical political issues and policy themes that, in turn, relate to their own interests and identities.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

The aims of this module are to:

  • Develop further understanding of the sociological and political analysis of educational policy and practice.
  • Analyse the factors that shape the making of policy at institutional levels using themes and questions of your choice.
  • Review the complex inter-relationships between these macro, meso and micro forms of education and politics.
  • Evaluate both the conventions and different forms of documentary and how they have been produced to interpret political issues and present a variety of critical perspectives on them.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

  • Evaluate current educational policy developments and how these impact upon educational practices.
  • Analyse the connections between broader political discourses and the ‘shaping’ of educational policy and practice.
  • Apply an analysis framework to how different policy initiatives in education are influenced by their ideological contexts.
  • Identify an appropriate area of education for exploration using an enquiry based approach.
  • Develop their capacity for critical reflection and questioning.
  • Engage an audience through the conventions of a documentary produced to explain a political issue and present a critical perspective on it.
  • Collaborate effectively with others in the production of a group documentary.
  • Manage their learning, work collaboratively in undertaking a small scale investigation and develop an appropriate strategy for a documentary production.
  • Make use of basic audio visual equipment (cameras, editing software) to produce a documentary.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Analysis (2000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Group Documentary (12 to 15 minutes)

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

MODULE CODE : ESU608


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module focuses specifically on the interconnectivity and interdependence of international and comparative aspects of education by exploring a range of analytical models drawn from sociological and political contexts. The module begins with an exploration of global historical contexts to consider how these relate to current worldwide controversies and challenges in educational policy and practice.  The module  will go on to invite students to explore a range perspectives to engage with themes including globalisation, educational transfer processes across nations, definitions of global ‘consumer’ and global ‘citizen’ and to consider how studies of pupil attainment contribute to global discussions about the future of education.  Students will explore differences & similarities in learning and teaching by comparing & contrasting aspects of the educational context in two different countries.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:  

  • Enable students to appreciate a multidisciplinary approach to the study of international & comparative education using a range of perspectives, including historical, cultural, sociological, economic and political models.
  • Critically review the concept of international and comparative study of education and consider international paradigms of educational ‘effectiveness’ and ‘improvement’ using a range of literature.
  • Understand the nature of the challenges that are currently being faced by the study of comparative and international education and how this contributes to the future of learning, teaching, research and professional development.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:
 

  • Critically reflect upon contemporary challenges and controversies in international education and understand how these relate to historical, sociological and political contexts. 
  • Discuss and share critically informed perspectives on differences between international and comparative aspects of education.
  • Identify key topics of personal interest in relation to international perspectives on educational policy and practice.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how international and comparative perspectives contribute to discussion on global educational aims and purposes.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Comparative Report (4000 words)

THEOLOGY IN THE MAKING: CONTEXT, METHODS AND CREATIVITY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : THEOLOGY IN THE MAKING: CONTEXT, METHODS AND CREATIVITY

MODULE CODE : THU603


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module engages with the ways in which theology is constructed and how the great themes of Christion thought inter-relate and impact on one another. The aim is to develop skills in systematic and synthetic thinking and to provoke creativity in theological engagement with contemporary modes of thinking. The module will open with lectures on the development of theological method from early symbol to the medieval syntheses and on to modern systematics. Then it will examine the theological geography of current postmodernity with its focus on diversity, ambiguity, fragmentation, openness and play. 

Week by week the module will focus on a major theme e.g. Creation, Fall, Redemption, Christology, Trinity, Grace, Ecclesiology, Eschatology etc.  Each theme will be addressed by the tutor in a formal lecture followed by a seminar in which the same theme will be addressed by students who have prepared short 10 minute expositions of key thinkers from different periods on the same theme. The seminar will then identify and explore the issues which would affect any satisfactory statement of the same theme today. Throughout attention will be paid to how developments on one area of thought inevitably effect the development of thought in another e.g. the effect of modern science and of ecological issues on the doctrines of Creation and of theological Anthropology. 

The module aims through the critical exploration of the constructive nature of theological work to relate creatively the various areas of theological knowledge covered in the student’s degree to the contemporary search for meaning and understanding.

 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to develop: 

  • A command of the development of Christian theological method across the classical Medieval and modern periods.
  • An understanding of, and the ability to critically evaluate, a variety of attempts at constructing Christian theology against the backcloth of extra-theological influences, social, political and cultural.
  • The ability to engage with major theological ideas and themes and reveal their inter-connectedness.
  • The ability to share insights and research findings through clear, coherent and short papers.
  • The ability to speak fluently to a topic in public to an audience of peers.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Analyse and evaluate formative theological texts and their influence.
  • Understand and critically evaluate a variety of approaches to interpreting the received tradition.
  • Creatively construct contemporary statements in the light of current critical concerns, in politics, sexuality, gender and culture.
  • Successfully research, explore and synthesise data on the great Christian theological themes.
  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from primary (translated) and secondary sources.
  • Work collaboratively and constructively in seminars.
  • Communicate clearly, coherently and concisely in structured written form.
  • Communicate clearly, concisely, and effectively in fluent speech to peers.
  • Use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for theological research.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 30% Outline of Seminar Paper (1000 words)

Component 2 - 70% Contemporary and Personal Statement (3000 words)

TEXT, CULTURE AND INTERPRETATION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : TEXT, CULTURE AND INTERPRETATION

MODULE CODE : THU606


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module provides the opportunity for students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the Jewish and Christian bible, and their skills of critically interpreting primary religious texts from a range of interpretational perspectives. A selection of biblical texts will be studied, which represent the major literary genres found within the Bible (e.g.  three or more of prophecy, apocalyptic, wisdom, narrative, poetry, gospels and letters) and which are drawn from both the Old and the New Testament. These will be explored both in relation to their original historical contexts and using the lens of some contemporary hermeneutical and cultural perspectives (e.g. feminist approaches, post-colonial perspectives, literary criticism). Students will be able to reflect critically on the reception history of biblical texts (e.g. in literature and art, and the reuse within the bible itself of older written and oral traditions), on their use in current ethical debates (e.g. around the equality of women or attitudes to homosexuality), and on the issues surrounding the task of bible translation. They will be able to pursue a particular area of interest in the field by negotiating with tutors a focus for an individual research project.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Deepen the students’ knowledge and understanding of the theological sub-discipline of biblical studies
  • Develop the students’ ability to analyse from a variety of hermeneutical perspectives the primary religious texts of the Jewish and Christian bible
  • Foster an appreciation of the connections between biblical texts and the reuse within the bible of older traditions
  • Develop the students’ ability to critically evaluate the use of the bible in contemporary cultural and ethical debates

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

  • Demonstrate a wide-ranging knowledge and critical understanding of a range of biblical texts and genres
  • Critically analyse biblical texts from a range of hermeneutical perspectives
  • Evaluate the interaction between biblical texts and wider societal, cultural, ethical and literary issues
  • Demonstrate an appreciation of the complexity of religious language and experience as captured in the sacred texts of Judaism and Christianity
  • Develop their skills of independent learning and research
  • Demonstrate their fluency and skills in academic writing appropriate for Level 6
  • Pursue a particular area of interest in the field of biblical studies through an individual, negotiated project

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Individual Research Project (5000 words)

EDUCATION, TECHNOLOGY AND CHANGE - optional module


MODULE TITLE : EDUCATION, TECHNOLOGY AND CHANGE

MODULE CODE : ESU606


MODULE SUMMARY :

The thematic and analytical focus of this module is the impact of digital media and new information and communication technologies upon culture, notions of identity and education / learning. Students will be introduced to the perspective that the spread of the new IC technologies is the source of some profound cultural changes that have massive implications for both socialisation and educational processes. Students will also be introduced to some of the ways in which educational outcomes for the 21st century can be facilitated by the incorporation and creative exploitation of the new technologies. Students will be expected to demonstrate that they can use the new technologies in their own creative educative production that critiques the impact of technologies on education.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Provide students with an opportunity to explore and critique the relations between education, technologies and digital media, in terms of socialization, learning and culture.
  • Enable students to take a critical position on the question of whether traditional education models can adapt to digital worlds or whether digital experiences transform education and outdate its traditional models.
  • Enable students to take a critical position on the potential changes that new technologies may bring, with particular regard to power, access, safety and ethics.
  • Support students in the development of technological skills and competences through the practical application and usage of the new technologies.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Analyse and critically evaluate the impact of the new technologies on cultural experience, personal development and upon education processes.
  • Contextualise understandings of education, digital media and technology in relation to critical questions about the transformative effects of technology.
  • Analyse and critically evaluate the potential impact of new technologies and digital media on learning theory and learning styles.
  • Critically apply their understanding of technological developments to philosophies of education.
  • Synoptically relate new ideas about digital media and technology to theory of education encountered previously on the degree.
  • Develop and demonstrate digital competencies sufficient for the construction of a   dynamic web site that communicates effectively to its intended audience

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Paired Website (4000 word equivalent)

CRITICAL THEORY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : CRITICAL THEORY

MODULE CODE : ESU604


MODULE SUMMARY :

This honours level module explores a range of critical theory and its potential applications to the field of Education Studies.  Each contribution is examined in relation to its philosophical and epistemological ‘moves’ and students are encouraged to develop critical responses to such theory in terms of its relevance to specific areas of psychology, sociology and learning theory. The module will cover a range of theoretical contributions in the order of their publication, and students will consider the relationship between each approach. A specific example of critical theory will be selected for application in dialogue with a particular area of Education Studies encountered in the degree.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:
 

  • Explore and apply critical perspectives on the philosophy and sociology of education drawn from such approaches as Marxism, Psychoanalysis, Post-structuralism, Feminism and Post-modernism. 
  • Equip students with the ability to apply critical theory to specific aspects of education.  
  • Develop a critical perspective in response to key theoretical contributions. 
  • Facilitate the independent development of new theoretical perspectives to aid progression to study for a higher degree.  

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Describe a range of critical theory approaches in relation to Education Studies.
  • Compare and comment on relationships between different critical theory approaches.
  • Understand the philosophical differences between critical theories and other approaches to society, identity, learning and texts. 
  • Apply critical theory to the study of education.
  • Reflect personally on their own construction in discourses about education. 
  • Critique, from an informed vantage point, theoretical language games.
  • Create new ways of thinking about education arising from their analysis of the dialectical nature of educational philosophy.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 20% Abstract for a conference paper and 10 - 15 minute presentation

Component 2 - 80% 3500 word paper following the presentation of the draft paper and feedback

ACCESS AND INCLUSION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : ACCESS AND INCLUSION

MODULE CODE : ESU609


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module offers students the opportunity for exploration of the concepts of inclusion, disability, and special educational needs and to gain an appreciation of the diversity of a range of vulnerable and disadvantaged groups. Students will engage with research in the area of inclusion and with the debate surrounding the effectiveness of the inclusion ‘agenda.’ This will include an in-depth consideration of the issue of pupil disaffection using current research and relevant literature. There will be an informed perspective on current debates in the field of Special Educational Needs and this will provide opportunities for students to engage with their own interests in this area. 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to provide students with opportunities to: 

  • Develop their knowledge and understanding of theoretical developments in the area of SEN.
  • Critically analyse the philosophies, principles and practice of inclusion and the legislative frameworks for SEN.
  • Gain comprehensive knowledge of the role and responsibilities of the SENCO; critically analyse the key debates in the field of special educational needs.
  • Synthesise and critically evaluate a range of research evidence offered in explanation of a broad range of special educational needs and provision.
  • Critically engage with research on a range of vulnerable and disadvantaged groups.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate an informed perspective on inclusion and current debates in the field of special educational needs and an informed understanding of, and sensitivity to, individuals with special needs.
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the legal and social implications of relevant legislation.
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of, and a critical and analytical appreciation of, a range of special education needs and a critical appreciation of intervention strategies.
  • Discuss and critically evaluate issues of inclusion with specific reference to research, theory and practice.
  • Critically engage with, and analyse reading and research into issues discussed in this module.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Individual Presentation (15 minutes)

MYSTICISM EAST AND WEST - optional module


MYSTICISM EAST AND WEST: details currently unavailable

A HOLISTIC APPROACH IN EDUCATION: SMSC - optional module


A HOLISTIC APPROACH IN EDUCATION: SMSC: details currently unavailable

CATHEDRALS AND THE ENGLISH SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS - optional module


CATHEDRALS AND THE ENGLISH SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS: details currently unavailable

LEARNING JOURNEYS - optional module


MODULE TITLE : LEARNING JOURNEYS

MODULE CODE : ESU611


MODULE SUMMARY :

‘Learning journeys’ are conceptualised, within this module, in terms of meanings that learners attribute to their experiences of learning and how individual and collective experiences may be critically analysed and interpreted. The overall purpose of the module is to enable students to review their own learning careers by developing their analysis of these experiences by working individually and collectively during the module.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Outline concepts of ‘learning career’, ‘learning journey’, critical events and turning points and situate these within research on life history and autobiographical methods.

  • Explore how notions of aspiration raising, barriers and progression are described as a series of problems or events to be rationally overcome.

  • Enable students to develop their capacity to review their own learning careers and journeys and interpret the factors that may have shaped them.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 


 

  • Critically analyse their own experiences of current and/or prior learning and identify critical events or ‘turning points’ that relate to these experiences.

  • Critique notions of aspiration raising, barriers and transition and how these have been constructed in policy texts

  • Critically debate these contested notions in policy texts and compare them with concepts of ‘learning journey’ or ‘learning career’ in life history research

  • Review and synthesise how other examples of life history research relate to events or ‘turning points’ within their own learning careers

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

No information available.

RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION: EUROPE IN CHANGE AND TRANSITION - optional module


Renaissance and Reformation: Europe in Change and Transition


Module Title: Renaissance and Reformation: Europe in Change and Transition

Module Code: THU609

Module Summary:
This module covers a fundamental period in the development of the western world – the Renaissance and Reformation. The module seeks to develop an understanding of these complex phenomena and their effect on Christian Theology and Practice by exploring their meanings through (translated) primary sources, images, key events and the lives of key individuals. We will concentrate on continental Europe with particular focus on Renaissance Florence and Reformation Germany and Switzerland.

In addition it will examine the various schools of interpretation of this period of European History by surveying not only classic texts, but also contemporary historical and theological interpretations.

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 36
Independent: 164
Placement: 0
Total: 200

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to develop:

• A critical command of the history of the key political, social, cultural and religious changes in Europe between 1400 and 1550
• An understanding of, and the ability to critically analyse, a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of European history, 1400-1550
• The ability to confidently engage with major theological ideas and themes within their historical context and to reflect intelligently on their long-term influence.
• The ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using a wide range of evidence from primary and secondary sources
• The ability to offer valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation
• The ability to work collaboratively effectively dividing tasks
• The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in speech appropriate to the audience
• The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in writing
• The ability to use word-processing, the College Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for historical theology

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

• Develop a command of the history of key political, social, cultural and religious changes in Europe, 1440-1550
• Analyse and evaluate theological texts and (translated) primary sources/data relating to Europe, 1400-1550
• Understand and critically analyse a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the Renaissance and Reformation
• Judiciously gather, sort and synthesise historical data and its impact on a range of theological themes within the period of study
• Develop fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from primary and secondary sources
• Work collaboratively on a shared presentation dividing tasks and synthesising approaches
• Communicate clearly, coherently and convincingly in well-structured writing.
• Communicate clearly, coherently, and convincingly in well-structured speech appropriate to the audience.
• Use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and demonstrate a discerning and critical use of other electronic sources of information for historical theology.

Assessment:

Component 1: 50% 15 minute Group Presentation (4-5 in a group) at The Barber Institute of Fine Arts (pass/fail) and 1,500 word individual critical analysis on a Renaissance painting

Component 2: 50% 4000 word commentary of a key Reformation Text

EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE - optional module


MODULE TITLE : EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE

MODULE CODE : THU605


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will provide opportunity for an in-depth study of both early Christianity in general and of particular early Christian texts, drawn from the New Testament and/or extra-canonical literature dating from the first and second centuries CE. There will be a particular focus on the development of the early church at the time of Paul, and the practical, ethical and doctrinal difficulties faced by the Christian communities he founded as recorded in his letters and the Acts of the Apostles. Students will be encouraged to actively engage in analysis and interpretation of the set texts of the major Pauline letters and the Acts of the Apostles. They will be required to locate these writings firmly in their socio-historical context, thereby developing their knowledge of the social, political and religious world of first century Judaism and the Roman Empire. Topics covered in the module may include some of, for example, early Christian theologies of salvation, christologies, eschatological expectations, forms of worship, community cohesion and identity, relations with Judaism, and ethical issues such as the role of women, attitudes to sex, and wealth and poverty. Students will be expected to engage fully with a range of critical perspectives on major aspects of Paul’s theology, including responding to the challenges posed to traditional post-Reformation accounts of Paul’s thought by the so-called ‘New Perspective on Paul’; specific areas considered may include, for example, his use of the Old Testament, his understanding of the place of the law in salvation, and his view on the future of Israel.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop the students’ knowledge and understanding of the history and theology of the early Christian movement
  • Develop the students’ understanding of the historical, political and religious background of the New Testament and of the importance of this for biblical interpretation
  • Foster in students a critical understanding of the theology of Paul
  • Deepen the students’ knowledge and understanding of some key texts in the early Christian literary corpus
  • Extend the students’ ability to critically analyse biblical texts from a variety of interpretational perspectives.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate an in-depth knowledge and a critical understanding of key early Christian texts
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the religious, social and political background of the early Christian movement
  • Demonstrate a critical engagement with a wide range of perspectives on the theology of Paul
  • Demonstrate a critical and empathetic understanding of the beliefs, practices and ethical values of the early Christians
  • Develop their skills of critically analysing primary religious texts from a variety of perspectives
  • Develop their skills of academic writing.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Textual Exegeses of Two Set Texts (2500 words)

Course code


VXP3

Applications for full-time courses are made through UCAS.

Applications for flexible learning courses are made via Newman.

.

For all enquiries relating to admissions or entry requirements, email us at admissions@newman.ac.uk

Ask us a question about this course