Applied Social Science BA (Hons)

Course length: 3 years full-time, 4.5 years part-time

Overview

Why study Applied Social Science?

Societies are changing rapidly and are increasingly having to respond to the challenges of globalisation, new technologies, demographic shifts and the aftereffects of austerity and recession. Drawing on insights from sociology, social policy, politics, psychology and criminology, our course offers students the opportunity to acquire a solid grounding in and critical understanding of social science, and how policies and political decisions impact on the lives of people and their communities, locally, nationally and internationally. You can expect to be engaged from the outset in lively and up-to-date debates about the big issues facing contemporary societies, exploring themes such as inequalities and exclusion, community cohesion, and the ways in which our everyday lives are shaped by ideas, culture and the media amongst other things.

You will learn how to apply social scientific knowledge to investigate and address real-world social and community concerns. You will also develop highly transferable research and communication skills which are relevant to a wide range of work and volunteering contexts.

In addition to being taught by lecturers with strong expertise in sociology, criminology, psychology and research, you will benefit from regular contributions from guest speakers with policy and practitioner backgrounds from across a range of relevant sectors, including charitable organisations, housing, health, social welfare and criminal and social justice.

What does the course cover?

This broad-based degree will deepen your knowledge of how societies operate and how people within them interact with one another. The first year equips you with a foundation of social science ideas and perspectives and encourages you to relate these to discussion of a wide range of contemporary social problems and community controversies.

As you progress through the programme, you will examine different areas of social policy and practice, including crime, social welfare and community development, and will have the opportunity to follow specific pathways: for example, public and political participation, identity and community studies. The course will promote critical thinking and extend your ability to link theory and research to policy and practice. You will learn about professional research skills and techniques and how to apply them competently and ethically to the evaluation and analysis of current social issues.

The programme allows you to take optional modules in areas that best reflect your emerging career aims and ambitions. You will also have the opportunity to undertake work placements and, in your final year, you will be able to pursue an independent, in-depth inquiry into a social science topic of special interest to you.

What makes this course noteworthy?
  • You will be taught by an experienced and supportive course team with active research interests in the applied social sciences
  • You will have opportunities to volunteer or undertake project work with local community organisations
  • You will enhance your employment prospects by undertaking a work placement as one of your modules
  • You will benefit from regular visiting speakers with policy and practice backgrounds
What careers can I consider?

The skills and knowledge developed on an Applied Social Science degree provide an excellent preparation for a wide range of occupations, including jobs in social and community services, local authorities, human resources, education, criminal justice, charities and the voluntary sector. Possible roles would include community development worker, police officer, offender manager, researcher, fund-raiser, housing officer, advice worker. Graduates can also progress on to a wide range of postgraduate degree programmes.

UNISTATS explanation

We currently have limited Key Information Set data as the course starts in September 2016, any statistics given above either relate to the University overall or are taken from an existing course within a related subject area.


Newman University would like to draw your attention to our Academic Regulations. These regulations are your Terms of Reference and should be considered when making a decision to study with our institution.

Entry requirements

 

September 2018 Entry Requirements

You must achieve either at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma), or a total of 88 points from a maximum of 3 A levels.

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9 M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

5 GCSEs at grade C or above including English Language or a recognised equivalent, are also required.

Please note, applicants may be called for an interview.  

Fees

Fees per academic year: 2017/18 
Full-time Home/EU students:  £9,250 * 
Part-time Home/EU students: £4,950 * 

* Please note for 2018/19 the University reserves the right to increase fees broadly in line with increases in inflation, or to reflect changes in government funding policies or changes agreed by Parliament.

Finance and Scholarship information

Additional costs:

A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is not required for entry into this programme, although it is in many cases required by employers before students can begin their Year 2 (level 5) work placement.  The cost of the DBS is currently £50 (including processing fee) with the option of subscribing to the update service which is currently £13 per year.  For more information on your DBS application please click here.

As a full time student, you will study a total of 120 credits each year. Credits are made up of mandatory modules and you may have a list of optional modules to choose from. Not every programme offers optional modules and when an optional module is available it will be clearly marked. All modules are listed below and you may not be required to complete all of these modules. Most modules are 20 credits and dissertations are 40 credits. Please note that not all optional modules run every year. For further information please email admissions@newman.ac.uk.

Year 1 modules


WHAT IS APPLIED SOCIAL SCIENCE? METHODS AND APPROACHES


MODULE TITLE : WHAT IS APPLIED SOCIAL SCIENCE? METHODS AND APPROACHES

MODULE CODE : SSU401


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module seeks to define the content and aims of the applied social science degree.  It introduces students to fundamental concepts: science as philosophy and method, the role of theory and evidence in the social sciences and the applications of social scientific knowledge in policy and practice. By addressing philosophical and methodological questions which are common to different social scientific disciplines and approaches, it provides students with the tools to begin to critically assess the knowledge claims, policies and practices which draw on social scientific ways of thinking, as well as preparing students to make their own informed choices in research and implementation. 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Give students an awareness of the distinctive methods of collecting information which characterise the social sciences.

  • Encourage students to engage with epistemological debates about the status of different kinds of knowledge.

  • Introduce students to the range of approaches to analysing, understanding and applying social scientific knowledge in different disciplines. 

  • Promote critical engagement with applications of social scientific knowledge in business, policy and professional practice. 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Explore the role of social scientific knowledge in the development of their worldviews, life experiences and employment histories.           

  • Develop their understanding of the development of social scientific thinking and practice. 

  • Compare the role of different social scientific research methods in different disciplines and professional applications.

  • Apply their philosophical and practical understanding of social scientific methods and approaches to real-life case studies. 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Reflective Essay (1500-2000 Words)

Component 2 - 50% Case Study (2000 Words)

VALUES, ETHICS AND JUDGEMENT


MODULE TITLE : VALUES, ETHICS AND JUDGMENT

MODULE CODE : SSU402


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module seeks to explore issues of values, ethics and judgement.  Beginning with an examination of different philosophical perspectives, this module will enable students to reflect upon the way in which individual and collective values are produced and reproduced within society.  It will introduce students to the notion of contested values and the complexity of ethical decisions. Students will then explore the way in which such values and ethics inform and influence the judgments that we make.  

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Provide an introduction to the way in which different philosophical positions inform ethical thinking (e.g. Utilitarianism Vs Kantianism) 

  • Explore the complexity of personal and professional values, and how these inform ethical decision making

  • Explore the intersections between individual values and institutional values

  • Examine the link between values, ethics and the way in which this informs policy and practice

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Articulate the relationship between values, ethics and judgement

  • Understand the complexity of personal and professional values in influencing how we approach practice 

  • Reflect upon their own values and how these influence the choices that they make

  • Work collaboratively with colleagues in exploring the ways in which values and ethics influence policy and practice

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Group Presentation (20 Mins)

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS


MODULE TITLE : GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

MODULE CODE : SSU403


MODULE SUMMARY :

Governments and politics form a crucial backdrop to all practical applications of social scientific ideas. This module will introduce students to the key institutions and processes which make up the British political system, and will explore how these are related to individual lives, international systems and social scientific ideas. It will draw on sociology, economics, political philosophy and international relations theory in surveying topics including democracy and elections, theories of the state, political parties, trade unions, markets, civil society, social movements and transnational institutions.  

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Introduce students to the basic political frameworks which govern life in the UK     

  • Compare British systems with those in other countries, with historical examples and with international institutions

  • Outline the rudiments of political philosophy

  • Reflect on the ways in which political philosophies are enacted and applied in real-world contexts

  • Familiarise students with the ways in which political philosophies and governmental practices affect individual lives and professional fields

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Explore the ways in which government and politics touch on their own lives and the lives of those around them.       

  • To study in detail how specific political institutions operate and relate to one-another

  • To demonstrate a critical awareness of how political processes apply to individual lives and collective endeavours.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 60% Essay (2000 Words)

Component 2 - 40% Group Poster (1500 Word Equivalent)

FOUNDATIONS OF PSYCHOLOGY


MODULE TITLE : FOUNDATIONS OF PSYCHOLOGY

MODULE CODE : PYU404


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module provides students with a broad introduction to the history of psychology as a scientific discipline. A number of different psychological perspectives will be introduced, for example, psychobiological, cognitive, behaviourist, psychodynamic, social constructionist, and students will be expected to apply and evaluate the application of such perspectives to important contemporary issues, such as drug addiction, violent behaviour, mental illness, etc. Research skills will be developed through the use of online databases and other library resources. Students will receive basic training in using Powerpoint to produce presentations, and in using the Library-based information resources.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Provide a broad introduction to psychology as a scientific discipline
  • Consider the historical origins of modern psychology
  • Introduce the student to a number of theoretical approaches
  • Illustrate how different approaches can be used to explain the same behaviour
  • Explore key issues and debates within psychology

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Describe the important antecedents contributing to the development of contemporary psychology
  • Apply psychological theories and evaluate research findings in applied contexts
  • Evaluate different psychological perspectives for an applied problem

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Lecture and Written Narration (15 minutes)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

THE SOCIOLOGICAL IMAGINATION


MODULE TITLE : THE SOCIOLOGICAL IMAGINATION

MODULE CODE : WWU404


MODULE SUMMARY :

Sociological concepts underpin our understandings of society, communities and families. This module will explore the sociological imagination by applying key theories to examples in contemporary society. The module will include examinations of classical sociological theorists including Marx, Durkheim and Weber as well as more contemporary sociology including Critical Race Theory, Feminist Perspectives and Postmodern approaches. The module will also consider the role of the media and discourse in shaping understandings and also critiques of the sociological canon as gendered and Eurocentric.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Explore and critique key theoretical concepts in sociology.
  • Apply sociological concepts to understanding society
  • Engage in a critical analysis of constructions of the family and community in relation to sociological concepts
  • Examine the role the media and discourse have in shaping understandings of society.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Critical examine sociological theory using contemporary examples.
  • Critically evaluate the role of the media and discourse in influencing concepts of society.
  • Critique the sociological canon.
  • Sociologically critique conceptions of the family and community.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Group Presentation (15 minutes)

Component 2 - 60% Essay (2000 words)

AN INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL POLICY


MODULE TITLE : AN INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL POLICY

MODULE CODE : WWU405


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will examine some of the over-arching social policy issues that shape the working agenda around children, young people and families. To do this it will be structured around the key issues identified by William Beveridge as the ‘giants’ of social policy – education, poverty, housing, health (including safeguarding and protection of the vulnerable) and work. These topics will be analysed in the context of the challenges that face professionals working within the current model of the welfare state.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims: 

  • To (begin to) equip students with skills to analyse policy
  • To provide students with a clear understanding of the origins of the welfare state
  • To allow students to examine the impact of poverty and deprivation on CYPF
  • To explore the way key services are structured and delivered
  • To examine the direction of travel in which the welfare state is being taken and to look at alternative models of welfare delivery

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Develop a better understanding of the role of social policy as a discipline
  • Understand the historical backdrop to the development of the welfare state
  • Understand how key areas of social policy are determined by their relationship to the welfare state
  • Be able to focus on specific arenas of policy development and delivery – e.g. education, health or housing
  • Begin to analyse the impact of the wider social policy environment on the design and delivery of services to CYPF
  • Be steered towards key thinkers and writers in this field.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 30% Timeline (1500 words)

Component 2 - 70% Essay (2500 words)

INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING


MODULE TITLE : INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING

MODULE CODE : PLU404


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module aims to equip students with the knowledge and self-management skills to make informed choices in preparing for work placement and the transition to employment or further study on graduation.  

Learners will be provided with the opportunities to develop awareness of the workplace, identify different career and study options, recognise and articulate their own experience, accomplishments and talents and plan and implement career management strategies for the short and long term.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 12.00
Independent : 88.00
Placement :
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Support students in developing informed choices about the career pathways available to them, in relation to their subject choices.
  • Prepare students for work-based learning and the application / exploration of subject knowledge in the workplace.

  • Encourage students to make connections between their learning, placement choice, future job aspirations and contribution to society.

  • Enable students to build confidence in securing work placements and future employment.

  • Support students in reflecting upon their preparation for their work placement and future employment.  

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

  1. Examine how their experiences, accomplishments, and abilities relate to employer expectations.

  2. Demonstrate engagement with, and an understanding of, graduate employment pathways and employability issues relating to their own career aspirations.

  3. Research organisations for the purposes of securing a work placement.

  4. Reflect upon their learning and development.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% WORK PLACEMENT E-PORTFOLIO (1500 EQUIVALENT)

Year 2 modules


RESEARCH INFORMED PRACTICE


RESEARCH INFORMED PRACTICE


Module Title: Research Informed Practice

Module Code: SSU501

Module Summary:
In the first part of the module, this research module aims to develop students’ research literacy; knowledge and understanding of research theory with a view to helping them understand where, why and how research was developed and its relationship to practice. It will also explore the choices of methodologies used for different research projects and consider the constraints and influences that have led to the research being undertaken in the way it was. The second part of the module will strengthen students’ knowledge and understanding or research methods with a particular view to developing and designing their own research idea.

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 48 (Lectures: 24; Seminars: 24)
Independent: 152
Placement: 0
Total: 200

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to:

•Explore the notion of research, and the different types of research (e.g social research, psychological research, Government Research)
•Develop students research literacy with a view to helping them understanding where, why and how the research was developed and its relationship to practice
•Explore research methodology theory including quantitative, qualitative and action research
•Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of research tools including interviews, observation, questionnaires, diary studies and life histories, case study, documentation and analysis and statistics. .
•Enable students to design effective research tools that are fit for purpose and meet ethical requirements.

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

•Offer definitions for and discuss a range of research terminology and understand the processes involved in carrying out a research project
•Understand what research ethics are and how to ensure that ethical considerations are in place when conducting research
•Be able to identify an appropriate research methodology and explain when and how to use the different research tools, identifying appropriateness to the methodology
•Discuss the issues involved in planning and undertaking a research project.
•Evaluate the possible success and failures of their chosen methodology.

Method of Assessment:
Component 1: 50% 2,000-2,500 word individual, written critique
Students are required to compare, contrast and critique two different research reports from a given list. (Submitted at the end of semester one)

Component 2: 50% 2,000 – 2,500 word individual research proposal (submitted at the end of semester two)

PERSPECTIVES ON ORGANIZATIONS


PERSPECTIVES ON ORGANIZATIONS


Module Title: Perspectives on Organizations

Module Code: SSU502

Module Summary:
Modern societies depend on complex organizations, both public and private. This module will introduce students to a range of ways of thinking about organizations drawing on systems theory, management studies, sociology and anthropology. By alternating theoretical material with case studies of particular organizations and issues, students will learn to think critically about values, goals, failure, efficiency, conflict, delivery and innovation within organizations.

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 36
Independent: 164
Placement: 0
Total: 200

Programmes for which this Module is Mandatory: BA (Hons) Single Honours Applied Social Science

Programmes where this Module may be taken as an Option: None

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to:

?Introduce students to key theoretical accounts of organizations.
?Explore the ways in which individual, professional and organizational values can be applied to collective working in organizations.
?Show how theories of organizations can be applied across professional fields.
?Identify common forms of miscommunication, inertia and organizational dysfunction.
?Demonstrate ways of identifying and solving organizational problems.

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

?Apply key theoretical accounts of organizations to real-world case studies.
?Critically assess the usefulness of different models of organizational processes.
?Reflect on the role of organizational processes in areas of professional interest to them.
?Look in detail at and critically assess the processes at work in a case study of their choice.

Method of Assessment:

Component 1: 100% Essay (4000 words) - critically analyse the causes and consequence of the catastrophic failure of a given case study and assess the organization's response

PERSPECTIVES ON COMMUNITIES


PERSPECTIVES ON COMMUNITIES


Module Title: Perspectives on Communities

Module Code: SSU503

Module Summary:
This module will explore the diverse and contested meanings of community and community work within cultural and sociological frameworks and contexts. It will analyse different models of how to intervene in communities, including how to challenge inequality and discrimination and examine contested terms such as community capacity and resilience. It will emphasize the importance of workers knowing the community contexts of their work and how this is variously perceived by other professionals, and different members of the community,

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 50 (Lectures: 30; Tutorials: 10; Project Supervision: 10)
Independent: 90
Fieldwork: 60
Total: 200

Programmes for which this Module is Mandatory: BA (Honours) Single Honours Applied Social Science

Programmes where this Module may be taken as an Option: None

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to:

?Explore the contested meanings of community and related concepts such as citizenship, social capital and resilience
?Analyse different approaches to community work
?Recognise the diversity within and between communities and the range of workers engaged in community work.
?Identify and analyse different methods of community intervention e.g. community development, capacity building, community organizing including enabling those who see themselves as powerless to challenge inequality and discrimination
?Evaluate methods of enquiry that develop understanding of communities and empower people within communities

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

?Understand and critique the contested meanings of community
?Understand and analyse the community-based context for practice
?Understand contexts in which workers are employed including the distinctive cultures of third sector and faith organisations, and multi-agency approaches
?Understand and critique the role of community work and organisations in contributing to cohesion and integration, contestation and change

Method of Assessment:

Component 1: 100% (4,000 words) Write a strategy to improve the position of an identified community. This strategy should include other professionals, and other members of the community.

CRIME AND POWER - optional module


MODULE TITLE : CRIME AND POWER

MODULE CODE : CRU504


MODULE SUMMARY :

Analysis of crime in society often focuses on street crimes and those offences committed by deprived sections of society. This module will focus on the relationship between crime and power and will examine the crimes committed by the powerful. White Collar Crime, State Crime and Environmental Crime will be explored and the definition of ‘crime’ itself will be critiqued and analysed. The notion of ‘social harm’ that crimes of the powerful can have on society will also be explored. Particular attention will be paid to the power of the state to both define and police ‘crime’. The role of the media in shaping perceptions of crime will also be explored.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Examine the definition of ‘crime’
  • Explore White Collar, State Crime and Environmental Crime
  • Examine the relationship between crime and power and the concept of social harm.
  • Discuss the power of state to define and police crime
  • Explore the role of the media in shaping perceptions of crime.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Critically evaluate definitions of crime 
  • Understand White Collar, State and Environmental Crime
  • Critique the role of the state in defining and policing crime
  • Analyse the relationship between crime, power and social harm.
  • Critique the role of the media in shaping understandings of crime.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 25% Report on Newspaper Article (1000 words)

Component 2 - 75% Essay (3000 words)

CRIME AND SOCIETY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : CRIME AND SOCIETY

MODULE CODE : CRU505


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module aims to develop students’ critical understanding of central debates concerning crime in contemporary society.  Students will engage with a range of theoretical and conceptual approaches to understanding crime, offending behaviour and victimisation, including the extent to which crime should be viewed as an individual pathology, or the consequences of social strain, or mass-mediated moral panic. 

The module will focus on selected topics in relation to the social construction of crime and victimisation, and policy and agency responses to them.  The module will consider the social dimensions of different types of crime and the ways in which these are represented in the media, public opinion and official discourses.  Crimes considered will include homicide and violence, alcohol and drug related offending, cyber-crime and youth crime.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop students’ appreciation of the scope of criminology as an interdisciplinary field of study
  • Develop students’ critical understanding of key concepts and theoretical approaches within criminology
  • Engage students with ‘live’ debates on crime and provide opportunities to apply appropriate criminological perspectives in analysis and explanation
  • Enhance students’ awareness of the criminal justice process in action, and the values and assumptions that underpin the practices and responses of key agencies and institutions working within it.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Identify and appraise different sources of data related to crime and victimisation
  • Describe and examine a range of key concepts and theoretical approaches within criminology
  • Recognise and critique values and processes underpinning criminal justice agency responses to crime
  • Communicate and synthesise effectively in appropriate written formats

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Briefing Paper/Policy Report (2000 words)

EDUCATION SYSTEMS AND SOCIAL CHANGE - optional module


MODULE TITLE : EDUCATION SYSTEMS AND SOCIAL CHANGE

MODULE CODE : ESU504


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module undertakes a development of themes and threshold concepts studied at Level 4 and, in particular, those in the Education and Society module. This module will explore the relationship between systems of schooling and education and their economic, political and social contexts within an emphasis on education policy. The module explores the relationship between specific moments of educational policy intervention and broader theoretical ideas about social change, political agendas and the nature of education as part of a system. The distinctive ideologies of different education systems will be explored through a detailed examination of the social origins of education systems. The module will then focus on how and why education systems change over place and time and the consequences these changes have upon educational experiences and outcomes.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

The aims of this module are to enable students to:

  • Explore the systemic features which shape the educational contexts within which educational systems develop.
  • Develop an understanding of the factors that shape educational policies and practices
  • Reflect on the interrelated processes of educational and social change.
  • Evaluate the relationships between education, the media and digital technologies in terms of learning and education systems.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have opportunities to:

  •  Outline policy developments in education and learning in post war Britain and how these reflect and have shaped educational processes and cultures.
  •  Evaluate the significance of different chosen policy initiatives in education in terms of the inter relationships between educational systems and social change at institutional, local, national
     and international levels.
  •  Identify the significance of chosen policy texts in terms of the education systems they have been produced within.
  •  Articulate their own interpretations of these texts informed by various forms of evidence and research.
  •  Develop their capacity for critical reflection and questioning.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Paired Presentation (15 minutes)

EDUCATIONAL POSSIBILITIES - optional module


MODULE TITLE : EDUCATIONAL POSSIBILITIES

MODULE CODE : ESU506


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module does education differently, both in terms of what we study as well as how we do it. Whereas other modules in education studies educate about education largely from a critical perspective on schools and societies, this module rips up the school and even society as we hegemonically know it. We look at, consider and discuss alternatives. The purpose of the explorations we undertake together are to know education afresh and differently. Examples of schools and a wide variety of out of school educational practice from around the world are considered. Our focus is on education with autonomy, self-direction, freedom not license, voice, community, destructured, unschooled, deschooled, home-led versions and other legal options. We will be dealing with practices within and outside the mainstream. The module has a strong focus on ideas, theories, philosophies and possibilities set within an awareness of the limitations the modern world imposes on any and all approaches which challenge ‘normality’.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Advance and critically discuss philosophical and ideological traditions pertinent to the study of education

  • Distinguish significant differences between competing conceptions of broad educational purpose and critically discuss these in light of relevant literature and personal experience

  • Draw distinction between philosophies, ideologies of education and ideas about education

  • Enable students to discuss and critically evaluate different conceptions of education in the context of the above and how these inform the shaping of educational policy, provision and practice

  • Enable students to articulate a provisional and personal philosophy of education that is informed through the above

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Know the defining features of some of the philosophies and ideologies that shape conceptions of education and educational practice

  • Have a knowledge of the philosophical and ideological traditions pertinent to the study of education and distinguish the significant differences between competing conceptions of educational purpose

  • Know that practice, provision and policy in education is situationally defined and governed by a range of external contexts and forces

  • Have an evolving personal philosophy of education that is informed by relevant , reading, research interrogation, pair and group discussion

  • Locate and distinguish some of the competing philosophies and ideologies of education

  • Identify that ways in which such philosophies and ideologies have shaped practice, provision and policy in education

  • Describe how philosophies, ideologies and ideas about education are different

  • Articulate their own personal, provisional and developing philosophy of education in written and oral form

  • Develop their capacity for critical reflection and questioning.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Prospectus and Commentary (3500 words)

DIGITAL CHILDHOODS - optional module


MODULE TITLE : DIGITAL CHILDHOODS

MODULE CODE : ESU508


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module considers the increasing role that digital media is playing in young people’s lives, and the implications of this for their development, education and well-being. Drawing on research, policy and contemporary thinking, students will explore both empowerment and protectionist discourses, as well as young people’s uses of and attitudes to technology. The module will consider e-safety issues and conditions for promoting digital literacy.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Outline contemporary debates around young peoples’ use of technology;
  • Explore the role of technology in society and related issues;
  • Enable students to understand the personal, social and educational implications of digital media use;
  • Help students consider issues of online behaviour and associated structure and agency;
  • Consider the ways in which digital literacies are promoted in schools;
  • Help students consider the ways that e-safety policies are implemented in different settings;
  • Promote students’ understanding of their own use of technology through discussion, debate and evaluation.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary thinking and practice around young people’s use of technology;         
  • Recognise that young people’s use of digital media are subject to a range of interpretations and competing agendas;
  • Consider ways in which young people’s use of digital media can be evaluated and understood;
  • Critically evaluate competing (and evolving) digital media policies;
  • Negotiate the selection of material for a public presentation;
  • Identify, select and synthesise appropriate literature, research data and materials for presentation;
  • Structure ideas and outcomes for an oral presentation.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Paired Presentation (20 minutes)

THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES IN PSYCHOLOGY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES IN PSYCHOLOGY

MODULE CODE : PYU504


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module extends students’ knowledge through a consideration of the applied area of Counselling Psychology.  Key theories used to work with clients in Counselling Psychology settings will be explored and evaluated.  The philosophy and professional context of the discipline will be discussed and students will develop and critique a range of counselling skills appropriate to helping professions

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Build on students’ theoretical knowledge of applied Psychology through consideration of the developing field of Counselling Psychology
  • Develop a critical appreciation of the key theories which are applied in Counselling Psychology when working with clients
  • Develop a critical awareness of the unique philosophy and professional context of Counselling approaches within the applied psychologies in the UK.
  • Facilitate a developing self-awareness and capacity for reflective practice
  • Identify therapeutic approaches that can be used by psychologists and others in helping professions

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Illustrate a sound knowledge and critical awareness of the key theories, concepts, models and research within Counselling Psychology
  • Critically appreciate the role of research in counselling psychology, and apply this to the evaluation of material covered in the module and to their own helping skills
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the philosophy and professional context of counselling psychology in the UK
  • Identify and analyse the ethical, professional aspects of applying a counselling approach.
  • Demonstrate, and critique a range of skills appropriate to professionals using a counselling approach.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Critical Reflection (2000 words)

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT: AN ETHOLOGICAL APPROACH - optional module


MODULE TITLE : HUMAN DEVELOPMENT: AN ETHOLOGICAL APPROACH

MODULE CODE : PYU506


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module builds upon the first year course and particularly the modules PYU404 Foundations of Psychology and PYU406 Research Design and Analysis 1. Developmental Psychology is generally viewed as one of several core areas in the discipline. This module, however, suggests that developmental psychology must be viewed as something more important and pervasive: All areas of the study of human existence can only be fully understood if a developmental perspective is adopted in the sense that all behaviour develops either by evolution (phylogeny) or during the lifespan of the organism (ontogeny). Furthermore, this module places developmental psychology in the wider context of studying the human condition by exploring not only the phylogeny and ontogeny of behaviour and thought but also their function and mechanism.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop critical understanding of the complexities of development including cognition, language, socialisation and enculturation from infancy through childhood to adolescence
  • Enable students to critically evaluate the principle theories and research paradigms offered in explanation of human development
  • Develop students’ understanding of the benefits of the complementary nature of an ethological approach to understanding human psychology by exploring the evolution, development, mechanism and function of thinking and behaviour and how such an approach may impact on current research questions and approaches 
  • Further students’ knowledge of the nature and nurture account of human development and the likely interaction between these two domains
  • Enhance the development of written communication, problem solving and analytical  skills required by the assessment    

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of aspects of human behaviour and experience in relation to, for example: social development, social perception and social influence, and how psychological theories relate to and/or might explain this
  • Evidence understanding of the nature of socialisation in childhood and adolescence and appraise factors involved in the process of social development
  • Analyse the impact of developmental changes on children’s learning and acquisition of knowledge
  • Appraise distinctive theoretical stances in developmental psychology and their influence on interpretation of research findings
  • Construct a research project to examine a particular aspect of development and to draw appropriate inferences from the results
  • Evidence the ability to consider and critically evaluate alternative arguments
  • Consider ethical issues related to research with children and adolescents and demonstrate an understanding of the British Psychological Society guidelines

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Critique of an Empirical Paper (1500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

WORK PLACEMENT


MODULE TITLE : WORK PLACEMENT

MODULE CODE : PLU502


MODULE SUMMARY :

This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 10.00
Independent : 90.00
Placement : 100.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement in a workplace setting.

  • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement and of their independent learning throughout the experience.

  • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.

  • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.

  • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to: 

  1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.

  2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.

  3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.

  4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - % PLACEMENT REGISTRATION FORM

Component 2 - 60% WORK PLACEMENT REFLECTION (2500 WORDS)

Component 3 - 40% WORK PLACEMENT EVALUATION: DIGITAL RESOURCE (1500 WORDS EQUIVALENT)

GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES ON CHILDHOOD - optional module


MODULE TITLE : GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES ON CHILDHOOD

MODULE CODE : WWU509


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module seeks to explore the way in which childhood is socially constructed within particular contexts and the consequences, particularly the broader ethical, moral and practical consequences of this. The module will focus on the relationship between constructions of childhood and the policy implications in different contexts. Particular attention will be paid to political ideology, human rights, migration, globalisation and neo-colonial analyses.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Critically explore how childhood is constructed in different contexts around the globe
  • Engage in a critical analysis of policy approaches towards children in different countries
  • Critically examine political ideology, human rights, migration, globalisation and neo-colonial analyses
  • Explore British approaches to childhood and related policy approaches in comparison to global perspectives.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Understand a critically interrogate constructions of childhoods in global contexts
  • Apply theoretical concepts to understand policy approaches in different countries
  • Critique Western universalist assumptions of childhood and policy approaches
  • Explore and critically analyse British constructs of childhood and policy in a global context.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 30% Presentation (15 minutes)

Component 2 - 70% Essay (3000 words)

Year 3 modules


CAPSTONE PROJECT - optional module


CAPSTONE PROJECT


Module Title: Capstone Project

Module Code: SSU601
Module Summary:
This module provides students with the opportunity to explore an area of particular interest through undertaking a small project supported by a member of staff from the subject area (or elsewhere) with appropriate specialist knowledge.
CATS Value: 40

ECTS Value: 20

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 26
Independent: 374
Placement: 0
Total: 400

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to:
•Enable students to identify a research or workplace problem and articulate a question/hypothesis relevant to one of the three projects to which they have opted.
•Enable students to acquire and apply a breadth of knowledge about the issue or phenomena in which they are engaged
•Enable students to select appropriate methods in relation to identified research or workplace purposes and justify their employment
•Support students in the development, revision and refinement of their project design
•Promote effective autonomous practice in the organisation and management of small-scale project.
•Enable students to develop creative and innovative approaches to disseminating project findings.
Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:
•Demonstrate a breadth of knowledge and understanding of the issue or phenomena in which they have been engaged
•Locate appropriate methods in relation to their chosen area of study
•Understand the basic principles of effective project design
•Know about some of the key contemporary thinking in their chosen area of study
•Identify a research or workplace problem and articulate relevant question/hypothesis
•Work autonomously in the management of a small scale project with guidance from an allocated supervisor
•Present a coherent study – either through written means or more creative methods - that details the choice of field of study, methods, and findings
•Develop their capacity for critical reflection and questioning.
Method of Assessment:

Component 1: 100% 10,000 word dissertation; students will produce a written report.

GLOBAL INEQUALITIES AND SUSTAINABILITY


GLOBAL INEQUALITIES AND SUSTAINABILITY


Module Title: Global Inequalities and Sustainability

Module Code: SSU602

Module Summary:
This module seeks to explore issues around globalisation, inequality and sustainability. It will critically explore the notion of globalisation and look at the historical, socio-economic and political factors and structures, which shape global inequalities. It will also seek to explore whether models of sustainable development both economic and ecological are useful in seeking solutions and also explore links to patterns of migration and the perceived ‘migrant crisis’.

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 36
Independent: 164
Placement: 0
Total: 200

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to:

•Critically evaluate the concept of globalisation
•Explore and evaluate patterns of migration; historical and current
•Describe and evaluate explanations for global inequalities
•Critically evaluate the role of key players such as Governments NGOs and structural organisation such as the IMF and World Bank
•Analyse the extent to which ideas around sustainable development challenge current orthodoxies

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

•Evaluate a range of perspectives on globalisation
•Understand the relationship between economic circumstances, patterns of migration and global social policies
•Explore the extent to which ideas around sustainability influence discourses on inequality
•Critically reflect on the strengths and limitations of current policy approaches to inequality

Method of Assessment:

Component 1: 100% 8- 10 minute video news report on an issue relating to global inequalities together with a 1500 word evaluative commentary

SOCIAL JUSTICE IN UNCERTAIN TIMES


SOCIAL JUSTICE IN UNCERTAIN TIMES


Module Title: Social Justice in Uncertain Times

Module Code: SSU603

Module Summary:
In a historic period characterised by uncertainty and increasing social insecurity this module will look at the applied challenges involved in promoting social justice. The module will look at what is driving this uncertainty: the ideology of neo-liberalism; the implementation of post welfare state arrangements legitimised by ‘austerity; an increasingly authoritarian and punitive public policy for the management of the ‘other’ internally and the (attempted) construction of ‘Fortress Europe’ to exclude the external ‘other’. Within this challenging environment students will be given opportunities to move beyond a critique of the impact of these trends to explore applied ways that social justice can be promoted, structural disadvantage overcome and equality and inclusion promoted.

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 36
Independent: 164
Placement: 0
Total: 200

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to:

•Enable students to understand the social, economic and political context in which the promotion of social justice takes place.
•Allow students to explore how this context potentially impacts on social justice initiatives.
•Develop students’ thinking on how social justice promotion can be achieved in these difficult times.
•Facilitate a practical problem approach to overcoming challenges based on applied creative thinking.
•Encourage students to develop ideas on both a micro and a macro scale when seeking solutions to challenges.

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

•Explore the social, economic and political context in which social justice must be promoted.
•Reinforced their understanding and familiarity with key social concepts.
•Apply these concepts to practical real world problems
•Increase their understanding of the problems facing potential progressive change and some of the potential strategies for overcoming these.
•Explore how a range of organisations, governments (both local and national); private business; not for sector providers of services and independent campaigning organisations can both generate both solutions and problems
•Undertake academic writing designed to apply theory to applied problems and issues.

Method of Assessment:

Component 1: 100% 3,000 word essay requiring students to consider how social justice can be promoted within the contemporary ideological and economic context and how strategies for solving problems can be developed in a real world context.

CRIME, PLACE AND SPACE - optional module


MODULE TITLE : CRIME, PLACE AND SPACE

MODULE CODE : CRU605


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will engage students in a detailed conceptual analysis of crime, space and place. Crime needs to be understood in relation to the private and public spaces in which it is located, such as the home, urban environments, rural environments, the school, shopping malls, parks, the prison, the street, neighbourhoods, and council estates. The module will explore how (and by whom) spaces are controlled and how this leads to perceptions within communities as to how to behave. Spaces (such as neighbourhoods) can become privatised, gentrified, gendered and racialised, leading to disproportionate policing and criminalisation. Students will critically examine how systems designed to reduce crime and provide safety in certain spaces – e.g. surveillance, affect criminal behaviour and people living in, or travelling through those spaces. Students will be encouraged take an ethnographic approach to understand the interaction between crime, place and space by exploring a real life space and relating this to theoretical frames.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Critically examine the concepts of place and space in relation to crime and criminal justice.

  • Explore how spaces become racialised, gendered and ghettoised and how this is related to crime.

  • Critically discuss the impact of privatisation and gentrification on urban spaces.

  • Explain and explore ethnographic approaches to understanding the relationship of space and crime.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Critically evaluate the relationship of crime space and criminal justice.

  • Understand the power relations underlying the symbolic boundaries of space.

  • Conduct a small scale ethnographic study critically examining the construction of space in relation to crime and criminal justice.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Individual Presentation (4000 word equivalent)

CRITICAL THEORY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : CRITICAL THEORY

MODULE CODE : ESU604


MODULE SUMMARY :

This honours level module explores a range of critical theory and its potential applications to the field of Education Studies.  Each contribution is examined in relation to its philosophical and epistemological ‘moves’ and students are encouraged to develop critical responses to such theory in terms of its relevance to specific areas of psychology, sociology and learning theory. The module will cover a range of theoretical contributions in the order of their publication, and students will consider the relationship between each approach. A specific example of critical theory will be selected for application in dialogue with a particular area of Education Studies encountered in the degree.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:
 

  • Explore and apply critical perspectives on the philosophy and sociology of education drawn from such approaches as Marxism, Psychoanalysis, Post-structuralism, Feminism and Post-modernism. 
  • Equip students with the ability to apply critical theory to specific aspects of education.  
  • Develop a critical perspective in response to key theoretical contributions. 
  • Facilitate the independent development of new theoretical perspectives to aid progression to study for a higher degree.  

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Describe a range of critical theory approaches in relation to Education Studies.
  • Compare and comment on relationships between different critical theory approaches.
  • Understand the philosophical differences between critical theories and other approaches to society, identity, learning and texts. 
  • Apply critical theory to the study of education.
  • Reflect personally on their own construction in discourses about education. 
  • Critique, from an informed vantage point, theoretical language games.
  • Create new ways of thinking about education arising from their analysis of the dialectical nature of educational philosophy.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 20% Abstract for a conference paper and 10 - 15 minute presentation

Component 2 - 80% 3500 word paper following the presentation of the draft paper and feedback

POLITICS OF EDUCATION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : POLITICS OF EDUCATION

MODULE CODE : ESU607


MODULE SUMMARY :

The module builds upon the understanding of sociological approaches to educational analysis introduced and developed at Level 4 and Level 5. It is designed to build on a range of knowledge, understanding and skills, in order to facilitate further understanding of the inter-relationships between education and political ideologies - within macro, meso and micro contexts. The overall purpose of the module is to enable students to question and analyse ‘common sense’ assumptions of policy and practice by investigating current and historical political issues and policy themes that, in turn, relate to their own interests and identities.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

The aims of this module are to:

  • Develop further understanding of the sociological and political analysis of educational policy and practice.
  • Analyse the factors that shape the making of policy at institutional levels using themes and questions of your choice.
  • Review the complex inter-relationships between these macro, meso and micro forms of education and politics.
  • Evaluate both the conventions and different forms of documentary and how they have been produced to interpret political issues and present a variety of critical perspectives on them.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

  • Evaluate current educational policy developments and how these impact upon educational practices.
  • Analyse the connections between broader political discourses and the ‘shaping’ of educational policy and practice.
  • Apply an analysis framework to how different policy initiatives in education are influenced by their ideological contexts.
  • Identify an appropriate area of education for exploration using an enquiry based approach.
  • Develop their capacity for critical reflection and questioning.
  • Engage an audience through the conventions of a documentary produced to explain a political issue and present a critical perspective on it.
  • Collaborate effectively with others in the production of a group documentary.
  • Manage their learning, work collaboratively in undertaking a small scale investigation and develop an appropriate strategy for a documentary production.
  • Make use of basic audio visual equipment (cameras, editing software) to produce a documentary.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Analysis (2000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Group Documentary (12 to 15 minutes)

HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

MODULE CODE : PYU604


MODULE SUMMARY :

Health psychology is an exciting field within psychology that has important contributions to make to our understanding of the causes, progression, and treatment of illnesses. The module explores the theoretical models, which attempt to explain and predict health behaviour and examines the practical application of these models in health promotion campaigns. It focuses upon the relationship between stress, health and illness, and the factors that mediate this relationship (e.g., individual differences). It considers the impact of living with a disability and/or a chronic illness from the biopsychosocial perspective, and considers the impact of illness cognitions on behaviour. The module will further consider the impact of being hospitalised on a patient's health and well being from a psychosocial perspective. Thus, the focus of this module is concerned with promotion and maintenance of health, prevention and management of illness, and the identification of biopsychosocial factors contributing to health and illness.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Build on students theoretical knowledge of Psychology through a consideration of the  rapidly developing field of health psychology
  • Develop a critical awareness of where the discipline of health psychology stands in a historical, academic and professional context
  • Consolidate students awareness of  the biopsychosocial approach to health and illness
  • Evaluate and examine the theoretical models which attempt to predict and explain health behaviours and examine the practical application of these models in health promotion campaigns
  • Provide students with a thorough grounding in the relationship between stress, illness and health, individual differences in health and illness, and the ways in which the impact of stress on health and illness is mediated
  • Raise students’ awareness and understanding of the psychosocial impact of disability and chronic illness
  • Examine the psychosocial aspects of the hospital environment and its effect on patient health and well being
  • Critically examine the impact of illness cognition on understating health behaviour
  • Facilitate the development of critical appraisal skills in evaluating health psychology research.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Illustrate a sound knowledge and critical awareness of the core concepts, theories, models within health psychology.
  • Demonstrate a systematic understanding of health psychology methods, and research.
  • Illustrate, a systematic understanding of the importance of health promotion within health psychology, and an in-depth understanding of the mechanism involved.
  • Display a critical and self-reflective awareness of the ethical issues evident within health psychology literature.
  • Demonstrate an in depth, analytical understanding of the importance and limitations of health psychology research to understanding health and illness.
  • Demonstrate the ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing, and sustained argument, using a range of primary sources in health psychology, and use it to formulate arguments within health psychology.
  • Critically demonstrate knowledge of the conventions surrounding production of a Health intervention proposal.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Health Intervention Proposal (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AND MENTAL WELL-BEING - optional module


MODULE TITLE : PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AND MENTAL WELL-BEING

MODULE CODE : PYU605


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module covers the key concepts related to psychological distress and mental wellbeing. The module will present different models of psychological distress including biological, psychological, social approaches as well as integrative bio-psychosocial models. The pervasiveness of medical views will also be discussed with typical use of terms such as mental illness, disorders, abnormality and clinical psychology as well as concepts of categorical (caseness) and dimensional views of psychological distress/illness. The module will include an historical account of mental distress and then focus on key psychological disorders and discuss their aetiology, diagnosis and treatment. Students will be encouraged to consider their own opinions and those of others as it relates to these topics. Learning occurs via two main components: a lecture series; and a series of seminars. The seminar series will especially provide a space for students to discuss and debate the key issues in psychological distress/illness. Assessment of the module will be via two components: submission of an analysis of a case study; and an end of module exam.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Build on students theoretical knowledge of Psychology through a consideration of the  rapidly developing field of clinical or mental-health psychology
  • Develop a critical awareness of where the discipline of clinical psychology stands in a historical, academic and professional context
  • Consolidate students awareness of  the biopsychosocial approach to mental wellbeing and psychological distress
  • Evaluate and examine the theoretical models which attempt to describe and explain mental distress Provide students with a thorough grounding in the major type of mental disorders
  • Raise students’ awareness and understanding of the psychosocial impact of mental distress
  • Facilitate engagement in key debates in clinical psychological using a range of approaches and evidence
  • Facilitate the development of critical appraisal skills in evaluating clinical psychology research

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Illustrate a sound knowledge and critical awareness of the core concepts, theories, models, and research within clinical psychology, and apply this to current topics.
  • Display a critical and self-reflective awareness of the ethical, sociocultural, and political issues evident in the clinical psychology literature.
  • Demonstrate an in depth knowledge and understanding of the importance and limitations of clinical psychology research to understanding mental health and psychological distress.
  • Demonstrate the ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing, and sustained argument, using a range of primary sources in clinical psychology, and use it to formulate arguments on specific topics of metal health and psychological distress.
  • Demonstrate a systematic understanding of clinical psychology theory, methods, and research.
  • Critically evaluate research findings in the field of clinical psychology.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Written Analysis (1500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT - optional module


MODULE TITLE : NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT

MODULE CODE : PLU601


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module offers students the opportunity to build on their level 5 work placement through the more developed application of a negotiated work-based research project. Students will agree with their placement tutor and workplace mentor a brief for a project which addresses a need within the organisation. Learners should complete a minimum of 100 hours in the work place. It is in the spirit of this module that wherever possible, the focus will be on social or community / sustainable development.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 276.00
Placement : 100.00
Total :  400.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Enable students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing a negotiated work-based research project

  • Encourage students to use appropriate work-based research methods

  • Enable students to work collaboratively in a work setting, establishing continuity from their previous work placement and offering tangible evidence of building on this prior experience, where possible

  • Generate confidence and security in students’ employability on graduation

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Secure, negotiate and design a work-based research project

  • Develop an understanding of, and apply, research methods that are appropriate to work-based contexts

  • Interpret gathered information

  • Make a clear and productive contribution to the organization through the development of recommendations arising from the work-based research project

  • Present a creatively engaging argument

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT (8000 WORDS)

SAFEGUARDING AND CHILD PROTECTION IN POLICY AND PRACTICE - optional module


MODULE TITLE : SAFEGUARDING AND CHILD PROTECTION IN POLICY AND PRACTICE

MODULE CODE : WWU603


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will provide students with the opportunity to explore historical and contemporary concerns that have served to shape policy and practice. Students will explore current legislation and its implications for practice for all those working with the young and vulnerable adults. A clearer understanding will be gained of the different roles and responsibilities of those working in the area of safeguarding. Consideration will be given to the impact that abuse can have on the lives of victims and their families.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Give students an understanding of the different forms of abuse and neglect that some children and young people experience in their day-to-day lives
  • Develop students’ ability to demonstrate how and why the policy and practice focus of safeguarding has changed over time
  • Critically evaluate how current legislation is likely to impact on safeguarding children and vulnerable adults
  • Explore the different roles and responsibilities that professional undertake in child protection and of the tensions and contradictions which can arise from this.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the way in which policy and practice for safeguarding has developed
  • Outline and analyse the content and intentions of key legislation within the area of safeguarding and child protection
  • Understand the forms that abuse can take and its implications for both victims and practitioners
  • Investigate and debate key issues facing practitioners working in this area.
  • Demonstrate an ability to synthesise arguments and understand the different principles that can inform practice
  • Apply different theoretical perspectives to develop an improved understanding of safeguarding and child protection work.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Essay (3500 words)

VOICE, RIGHTS AND REPRESENTATION - optional module


MODULE TITLE : VOICE, RIGHTS AND REPRESENTATION

MODULE CODE : WWU607


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will focus on developing critical understandings of concepts of advocacy in different contexts. Central to the module is an exploration of how advocacy can have a role in challenging oppression, with particular emphasis on understanding issues of voice, human rights and representation for marginalised groups.  Applied advocacy, in its different forms, will be critically analysed drawing out issues related to power and with some emphasis on the potential for children, young people and communities becoming their own advocates.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Critically reflect on the underpinning definitions, and associated values and principles, of advocacy
  • Critically reflect on the need for advocacy in challenging oppression, with particular emphasis on understanding issues of voice, human rights and representation for marginalised groups
  • Critically analyse understandings of listening and the inherent tensions in policy and practice
  • Critically analyse understandings of applied advocacy in different contexts.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Identify some of the key models of advocacy and associated benefits, tensions and complexities
  • Demonstrate and understanding of the role of personal, professional and institutional values in supporting advocacy in different contexts
  • Evaluate understandings of voice, rights and representation
  • Apply understandings of advocacy to examples of practice in working with different communities
  • Design a campaign in response to an issue of advocacy.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Group Presentation (20 minutes)

Component 2 - 50% Reflective Essay (2000 words)

YOUNG PEOPLE AND CRIME - optional module


MODULE TITLE : YOUNG PEOPLE AND CRIME

MODULE CODE : CRU609


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module critically examines a range of criminological theory, both historical and contemporary, that seeks to explain why young people commit crime and how it has and continues to inform governmental responses to youth crime. This will include some discussion of current policy and legislation and an analysis of structures within the British Criminal Justice System (focusing on England and Wales) such as Youth Offending Teams. Particular focus will be on how young peoples’ criminal behaviour is interpreted and contested in the media and political discourses and how youth crime policy impacts disproportionately on certain groups of young people within society (e.g. black young people, young people who meet on the street, etc.). A recurrent theme will be how current models of work with young people involved in crime and multi-professional efforts to bring about desistance from that behaviour may conflict with the workers reluctance to engage in social control.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 40.00
Independent : 160.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Introduce students to fundamental concepts in criminology, looking at how these have developed over time in relation to young people, and how they can be applied to practice,

  • Analyse the legal framework around young people and crime (including the Criminal Justice System), the rationales behind its structure and young people’s experience of it,

  • Critically reflect on current discourse, policy and practice around young people and crime,

  • Introduce students to the skills, knowledge and understanding needed to work within the Youth Justice system.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Examine and critically appraise a range of theories which seek to explain youth crime    

  • Consider a range of responses and strategies designed to bring about desistance from crime

  • Hear visiting speakers from the youth justice field sharing their experiences of working with young offenders

  • Articulate a coherent personal position on the effectiveness of current policy responses to youth crime

  • Understand how those policy responses impact on a diverse range of young people.

     

    And demonstrate that he/she

     

  • Critically understands contexts  in which community and youth workers are employed including the distinctive cultures of third sector and faith organisations, and multi agency approaches

  • Is a professional who understands and can articulate their role as educators in relation to other professionals

  • Can organise and articulate of opinions and arguments in speech and writing, including justifying a personal position in relation to the subject.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% ESSAY, 3000 WORDS

Course code


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UCAS code:

 L310

Applications for full-time courses are made through UCAS.

For all enquiries relating to admissions or entry requirements, email us at admissions@newman.ac.uk

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