Creative Writing BA (Hons)

Course length: 3 years full-time, 4.5 years part-time

Overview

Why study this course?

The new BA (Hons) Creative Writing allows you to pursue your passion for the art of creative writing practice itself. The programme covers writing in different genres as well as offering you the opportunity to specialise once you have found your voice. The programme enables you to gain a deep understanding of the way genres work. The degree prepares you very well for a creative writing career. Our work placement modules and the professional portfolios in the final year, give you the knowledge and experience you need to start building your career. This is the perfect course for those who want to hone the craft of writing and be prepared for employment.

The course is taught by experienced, enthusiastic and supportive tutors whose expertise in creative writing, the publishing industry and literary analysis means they are able to guide you on all aspects of the subject. They are joined by a wide range of visiting professional writers who will work with you on your own writing practice.

What does this course cover?

Throughout the Creative Writing modules you will develop your creativity in a range of fictional and non-fictional writing. Your versatility as a witer will be nurtured in a supportive environment. You will get the opportunity to enjoy intensive writing experiences from creative field trips to events on the art of writing with published writers. You will also get the chance to attend workshops and events at the Birmingham Literature Festival organised by one of our many partners, Writing West Midlands.

You will be guided in the development of your own professional portfolio and encouraged to explore routes to publication and performance. Employability is built into the programme through links with partners such as Writing West Midlands and the work placement modules. The portfolio modules in the final year allow you to explore your preferred genres and help prepare you for professional practice.

What makes this course noteworthy?
  • All creative writing modules incorporate the creative workshop structure where students and tutors work in close collaboration in small supportive groups.
  • Innovative use is made of e-learning facilities to also allow virtual workshops
  • Newman has excellent links with local literary organisations including Writing West Midlands and the Birmingham Literature Festival. Your experience will be enriched by subsidised trips to festival events where you can meet and listen to leading writers. Previous visits have included attendance at talks by Carol Ann Duffy, Benjamin Zephaniah, Jackie Kay and Patience Agbabi
What careers can I consider?

The life of the writer is changing and tutors at Newman understand this. Your creative, communication, and analytical skills are highly valued in the sectors of: publishing, journalism, advertising, marketing, new media and consultancy. You are also well positioned to enter teaching (at any level), arts administration, culture and heritage sectors, libraries, theatre and performance. As with graduates of English, there are also excellent employment rates in non-subject related professions such as law, health management, management in other sectors, and Human Resources. Work placements provide you with the kind of valuable work experience that is attractive to potential employers while the outward facing nature of the Creative Writing degree means that all students are encouraged to consider their value within the wider community, making writing a viable route into many diverse and exciting careers.


Newman University would like to draw your attention to our Academic Regulations. These regulations are your Terms of Reference and should be considered when making a decision to study with our institution.

Entry requirements

September 2018 Entry Requirements

You must achieve either at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma), or a total of 88 points from a maximum of 3 A levels. 

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9 M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

A level (or equivalent) in a humanities/social sciences related subject and 5 GCSEs at grade 4/C or above including English at 5/C or above, or recognised equivalents are also required. 

Applicants may be called for interview. 

Fees

Fees per academic year: 2017/18 

Full-time UK/EU Students: £9,250*

Part-time UK/EU Students: £4,950*

Please note for 2018/19 the University reserves the right to increase fees broadly in line with increases in inflation, or to reflect changes in government funding policies or changes agreed by Parliament.

Finance and Scholarship information

Additional costs:

A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is not required for entry into this programme, although it is in many cases required by employers before students can begin their Year 2 (level 5) work placement.  The cost of the DBS is currently £55 (including processing fee) with the option of subscribing to the update service which is currently £13 per year.  For more information on your DBS application please click here.

As part of your course you will undertake a field trip for module ENU507 (Writing and Location) and incur additional costs. Based on the field trip in 2016, the costs of the trip including travel totalled £115. All costs are subject to change and the example given is based on 2016. Additional funds are required for personal subsistence’. ENU507 is a mandatory module, not optional. Payment will due during Year 2. 

As a full time student, you will study a total of 120 credits each year. Credits are made up of mandatory modules and you may have a list of optional modules to choose from. Not every programme offers optional modules and when an optional module is available it will be clearly marked. All modules are listed below and you may not be required to complete all of these modules. Most modules are 20 credits and dissertations are 40 credits. Please note that not all optional modules run every year. For further information please email admissions@newman.ac.uk.

Year 1 modules


WAYS OF READING I


MODULE TITLE : WAYS OF READING I

MODULE CODE : ENU401


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module prepares students for university study and continues from induction week subject sessions. In terms of English subject content it covers, for prose: close reading, context and intertextuality, genre, figurative language, narrative structure, perspective, time, character, and, theoretically, structuralism; for poetry: close reading, poetic forms, rhyme, metre and scansion, figurative language. 

The following skills for studying English will also be taught in this module: transition from college to university study; using the range of university systems supporting learning (for example: Moodle, eBooks Dawsonera and Cambridge Companions Online, support services, library help desk, email) and understanding who to contact for particular support; understanding that interpretation of text is multiple and contextual (that there is no one right answer); essay writing skills including thesis statements, topic sentences, paragraph organisation, and building an effective argument; target setting from assessment feedback; finding accurate context for individual texts; using secondary sources to support argument. (NB this module does not cover the skills of independently finding secondary reading (see Reading Strategy below); this is covered in Introduction to Drama and Ways of Reading II.)

 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 42.00
Independent : 152.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  194.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module will allow for formative assessment through developing the essay component of assessment in sections; for formative feedback students will be required to upload elements by specific dates set throughout the module. The bibliographic element of the essay will be formatively peer-assessed within a seminar. 

This module aims to:

  • Introduce students to some texts from a range of genres and periods
  • Enable students to gain a basic knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts of the production of texts
  • Teach students the basis of narrative theory and poetic analysis, and how to apply these to make meanings from their close reading of texts
  • Develop, in students, an ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation
  • Teach students how to create work that is coherently structured
  • Develop students’ self-efficacy by explicitly discussing and practising ways to manage their time, plan and organise their workload to  meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Gain a introductory knowledge of a some texts from a range of genres and periods
  • Gain a basic knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts of the production of texts
  • Gain a basic knowledge and understanding of how prose and poetic texts work in narrative terms
  • Apply narrative theory and poetic analysis to make meanings from their close reading of texts
  • Develop a basic ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation
  • Demonstrate the ability to create work that is coherently structured
  • Begin to develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.          

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Examination (90 minutes)

Component 2 - 50% Portfolio (2000 words)

WAYS OF READING II


MODULE TITLE : WAYS OF READING II

MODULE CODE : ENU402


MODULE SUMMARY :

The focus of this module is to start to develop students’ ability to study independently and reduce their reliance on transmission models of learning. This will include researching around a topic, working collaboratively with peers, developing their self-efficacy by promoting their capabilities to approach tasks as challenges to be mastered, understanding ‘setbacks’ as opportunities to target set. These aspects of the module will particularly be developed through workshops of structured activities, online directed tasks relating to the Reflective Journal assessment (Component 2), and tutorials. 

The subject content of the module will cover the genre of ‘narrative verse’. Lectures and set text examples will introduce some of the ways of categorizing and ordering texts within a genre, and introduce students to the need to see generic boundaries as flexible. In seminars, students will be required to explore independently the fuller scope of the field, individual authors’ works, other examples of texts which use the specific features of sub-genres in the field, and useful secondary resources to support learning.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

The assessment on this 10 credit module is made of two components; this is to allow both the subject knowledge and independent learning to be assessed. To mitigate against any assessment overload, the presentations will be developed within the workshops through directed group tasks; the reflected journal will be structured and students will be directed to write entries throughout the module. The self- and peer- assessment exercise for the presentation (Component 1) will feed into the reflective journal as the exercise will help students to reflect on their abilities to collaborate productively with others in producing research, negotiation, problem solving, writing, and presentation. This exercise derives from work developed by the Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development at Oxford Brookes University. 

This module aims to: 

  • Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary, linguistic and visual characteristics of the sub-genres of narrative verse
  • Encourage students to explore generic boundaries, and the value of flexibility in genre, through and understanding of generic conventions relevant to narrative verse forms.
  • Teach students how to develop their independent research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material
  • Encourage the development of students’ self-efficacy through structured reflection on their own learning
  • Develop the students’ skills in effective collaborative research work
  • Enable students to start to identify the attributes, skills and approaches developed through study in the Humanities and valued by employers.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary, linguistic and visual characteristics of the sub-genres of narrative verse
  • Explore generic boundaries, and the value of flexibility in genre, through and understanding of generic conventions relevant to narrative verse forms
  • Develop their research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material, at an introductory level
  • Begin to develop their self-efficacy by reflecting upon their own learning
  • To collaborate productively with others in research, negotiation, problem solving, writing, and presentation skills
  • Identify the attributes, skills and approaches developed through study in the Humanities and valued by employers.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 30% Group Presentation (5 minutes, per group member)

Component 2 - 70% Reflective Journal (1000 words)

READING FILM


MODULE TITLE : READING FILM

MODULE CODE : ENU406


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will introduce students to the basic vocabulary of film language and develop their critical skills in reading visual texts. Through a study of two or three key films, there will be a particular focus on the ways in which space and time are organised within the Hollywood continuity system through the technical elements of mise-en-scene, including iconography, camera framing, editing and sound. There will also be a consideration of how spectator point of view can be controlled and directed in film in different ways than in prose fiction. Students will be encouraged to be articulate about their experience of the workings of film narratives and to begin to see textual analysis as part of a wider consideration of cultural history. After an introduction to scriptwriting, they will apply their knowledge and understanding of the language of film in their assignments. Assignment 1 will comprise a short analysis of the characteristics of a prescribed film scene. In assignment 2, they will choose, from among a range of stories, an extract to adapt into a film script. They will also provide a commentary, constituting an interpretation of the meanings of their chosen story and a discussion of the film forms and technical strategies which they have incorporated into their script.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Help students gain a detailed knowledge of the distinctive characteristics of a range of films and some short stories
  • Help students' gain an introductory knowledge and understanding of the historical, cultural and social contexts in which films are produced and how these can affect their interpretation;
  • Develop students' ability to think critically about film and literature and to write about it in ways that are structured, reflective and analytical;
  • Develop students' knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically some  theoretical approaches to texts, including basic narrative theory, concepts of ideology and semiotics
  • Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of  secondary critical material and resources
  • Encourage creative practice in order to engender a sensitivity to the affective power of film language
  • Generate an awareness of how the study of literature and film can be integrated and an appreciation of the ways in which film and literary forms and narrative strategies differ.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Gain an introductory knowledge of a range of films
  • Gain a basic knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts of the production of films
  • Gain a basic knowledge and understanding of narrative theory, structural theory (semiotics) and ideology in relation to short stories and film productions
  • Gain knowledge and understanding of the distinctive audio and visual conventions through which meanings and representations are constructed in cinematic genres.
  • Apply critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of films and short stories
  • Develop a basic ability to use critical and analytical terminology appropriate to the discussion of film and appropriate scholarly citation
  • Gain some knowledge and understanding of generic conventions and the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts
  • Gain some experience of creative practice primarily as a means to critical reflection
  • Demonstrate literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
  • Develop their research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret  information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material, at an introductory level;
  • Begin to develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to  meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 30% Written Critical Analysis of a Film Scene (1000 words)

Component 2 - 70% Portfolio

CHALLENGING THE CANON


MODULE TITLE : CHALLENGING THE CANON

MODULE CODE : ENU409


MODULE SUMMARY :

This Level 4 module introduces students to the notion of the literary canon and examines its usefulness, limitations, relativity and Western bias. Students will study paired texts: a canonical text alongside a ‘transformative text’ which rewrites the original in some way (what Genette terms the ‘hypotext’ and its ‘hypertext’). Students will be introduced to theories of intertextuality and asked to think about how texts function in relation to other texts. Students will also consider the various ways the later text problematizes the original, either in terms of subject (gender, race, class, sexuality, context, etc.) or form (experiments with narrative, genre, language, etc.). By bringing these texts into dialogue students will have the opportunity to question the bases upon which literary texts are valued and how decisions about canonicity function ideologically. The module aims to develop students’ understanding of the relationship between text and context as well as introduce selected broad critical concepts, such as feminist, postcolonial and Marxist approaches.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Help students to think critically about how literature is categorised, evaluated and valued
  • Help students gain a knowledge and understanding of how historical, cultural and social contexts affect the production, validation and interpretation of literary texts
  • Enable students to critically analyse and compare the set texts, evaluating their similarities and differences
  • Help students to select relevant and appropriate secondary sources, to summarise their content and to evaluate their usefulness
  • Introduce students to selected critical concepts and help them to identify and discuss these concepts.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate a knowledge of what the literary canon is, how it functions, its usefulness and its limitations
  • Read a number of canonical texts alongside their ‘transformative texts’ and demonstrate the ability to discuss the relationships between them
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts of the production of texts
  • Gain a knowledge of some critical concepts and demonstrate that they can identify and discuss relevant critical concepts
  • Develop their research skills including the ability to select appropriate and relevant secondary materials and evaluate their usefulness
  • Demonstrate the ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation
  • Present cogent and persuasive arguments, orally and in writing
  • Develop their literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 25% Annotated Bibliography (1500 words)

Component 2 - 75% Essay (2500 words)

THE LIFE OF THE WRITER


MODULE TITLE : THE LIFE OF THE WRITER

MODULE CODE : ENU410


MODULE SUMMARY :

This foundational module introduces you to key elements of the writing process, from drafting and planning using a writer's journal, to building the confidence to share writing with your peers in a friendly and supportive workshop environment, and subsequent stages of revising and editing. Seminars introduce you to valuable processes of reading as a writer, while workshops supply opportunities for regular formative feedback on your writing. As well as supporting you through your development of key creative writing skills, this module also encourages you to consider your rationale for writing, whether personal, political, or both, and helps you to position yourself as part of a writing community. The holistic approach to creative writing that this module adopts aims to build individual confidence and nurture creativity as well as encouraging you to consider the wider impact of your writing.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop students' ability to plan and research their writing using a writer's journal;
  • Develop students' ability to reflect on their own writing and that of others in a workshop environment;
  • Develop student's ability to draft and edit their writing as a result of workshop feedback;
  • Develop students' ability to reflect on their writing practice;
  • Develop students' capacity for independent thought and originality and authenticity in writing;
  • Familiarise students with a range of literature from different historical periods and cultures relating to the module's themes;
  • Develop students ability to respond to such literature both creatively and critically;
  • Familiarise students with the wider writing community;
  • Support students in the development of their own writing.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate the ability to engage productively in the various stages of the writing process;
  • Demonstrate an ability to reflect constructively on their own development as writers;
  • Develop the capacity for independent thought as linked to the authenticity, originality and inventiveness of their writing, and the ability to take calculated and contextualised risks in the pursuit of this aim;
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in particular contexts and create work that is coherently and appropriately structured;
  • Demonstrate awareness of the distinctive literary and linguistic characteristics of genres and the ability to employ these in their writing;
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the different contexts (historical/ cultural/ geographical/ economic/ political/ social) which can influence the form and interpretation of texts;
  • Develop knowledge of the wider writing community;
  • Collaborate productively with others in workshops.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Writing Portfolio (3000 words)

INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING


MODULE TITLE : INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING

MODULE CODE : PLU404


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module aims to equip students with the knowledge and self-management skills to make informed choices in preparing for work placement and the transition to employment or further study on graduation.  

Learners will be provided with the opportunities to develop awareness of the workplace, identify different career and study options, recognise and articulate their own experience, accomplishments and talents and plan and implement career management strategies for the short and long term.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 12.00
Independent : 88.00
Placement :
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Support students in developing informed choices about the career pathways available to them, in relation to their subject choices.
  • Prepare students for work-based learning and the application / exploration of subject knowledge in the workplace.

  • Encourage students to make connections between their learning, placement choice, future job aspirations and contribution to society.

  • Enable students to build confidence in securing work placements and future employment.

  • Support students in reflecting upon their preparation for their work placement and future employment.  

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

  1. Examine how their experiences, accomplishments, and abilities relate to employer expectations.

  2. Demonstrate engagement with, and an understanding of, graduate employment pathways and employability issues relating to their own career aspirations.

  3. Research organisations for the purposes of securing a work placement.

  4. Reflect upon their learning and development.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Reflective Essay and Appendix, 2000 words

INTRODUCTION TO POETRY AND PROSE


Introduction to Poetry and Prose: details currently unavailable

Year 2 modules


WORK PLACEMENT


MODULE TITLE : WORK PLACEMENT

MODULE CODE : PLU502


MODULE SUMMARY :

This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 10.00
Independent : 90.00
Placement : 100.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement in a workplace setting.

  • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement and of their independent learning throughout the experience.

  • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.

  • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.

  • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to: 

  1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.

  2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.

  3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.

  4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - % PLACEMENT REGISTRATION FORM

Component 2 - 60% WORK PLACEMENT REFLECTION (2500 WORDS)

Component 3 - 40% WORK PLACEMENT EVALUATION: DIGITAL RESOURCE (1500 WORDS EQUIVALENT)

OPEN TO INTERPRETATION: TWENTIETH-CENTURY THEORY AND FICTION I


MODULE TITLE : OPEN TO INTERPRETATION: TWENTIETH-CENTURY THEORY, AND FICTION I

MODULE CODE : ENU500


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module introduces students to modern critical approaches to studying literature. Students will build on the skills demonstrated at Level 4 and extend the ways in which they can approach the critical analysis of literary texts. Students will go on to study ‘Open to Interpretation: Twentieth-Century Theory and Fiction II in semester two of level 5. Over the two modules, students will develop their knowledge of a number of critical approaches, such as: Formalism, New Criticism, Structuralism, Poststructuralism, Deconstruction, Marxism, Cultural Materialism, Feminism, Postfeminism, Postcolonialism, Psychoanalysis, Ecocriticism, and Postmodernism. Lecture sessions will include practical workshop tasks that will help students to analyse literary texts by way of these theories. The module will also include a reflective element and support the Personal Tutorial system established at Level 4.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop students’ awareness of modern critical approaches to studying literature
  • Extend students’ knowledge of the theoretical underpinnings, terminology and specific concepts relating to various critical approaches
  • Enable students to select and apply appropriate methods of criticism to literary texts
  • Develop students’ awareness of the ways in which literary texts may be interpreted differently within particular literary, cultural and socio-historical contexts
  • An ability to produce independent work of an appropriately academic standard.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Discuss the background, theoretical underpinnings and key strategies of a number of critical approaches in an intelligent and coherent manner
  • Understand the ways in which the interpretation of literary texts can vary in accordance with literary, cultural and socio-historical factors
  • Use critical terminology accurately
  • Produce sophisticated and imaginative analyses of literary texts using relevant critical concepts
  • Make appropriate use of both primary and secondary source materials, including theoretical essays.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (2500 words)

OPEN TO INTERPRETATION: TWENTIETH-CENTURY THEORY, AND FICTION II


MODULE TITLE : OPEN TO INTERPRETATION: TWENTIETH-CENTURY THEORY AND FICTION II

MODULE CODE : ENU520


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module introduces students to modern critical approaches to studying literature. Students will build on the skills demonstrated at Level 4 and in the first semester module ‘Open to Interpretation: Twentieth-Century Theory and Fiction I’. Students will continue to extend the ways in which they can approach the critical analysis of literary texts. Over the two modules, students will develop their knowledge of a number of critical approaches, such as: Formalism, New Criticism, Structuralism, Poststructuralism, Deconstruction, Marxism, Cultural Materialism, Feminism, Postfeminism, Postcolonialism, Psychoanalysis, Ecocriticism, and Postmodernism. Lecture sessions will include practical workshop tasks that will help students to analyse literary texts by way of these theories. The module will also support the Personal Tutorial system established at Level 4. The final weeks of the module are specifically designed to prepare students for the Level 6 dissertation.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop students’ awareness of modern critical approaches to studying literature
  • Extend students’ knowledge of the theoretical underpinnings, terminology and specific concepts relating to various critical approaches
  • Enable students to select and apply appropriate methods of criticism to literary texts
  • Develop students’ awareness of the ways in which literary texts may be interpreted differently within particular literary, cultural and socio-historical contexts
  • An ability to produce independent work of an appropriately academic standard.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Discuss the background, theoretical underpinnings and key strategies of a number of critical approaches in an intelligent and coherent manner
  • Understand the ways in which the interpretation of literary texts can vary in accordance with literary, cultural and socio-historical factors
  • Use critical terminology accurately
  • Produce sophisticated and imaginative analyses of literary texts using relevant critical concepts
  • Make appropriate use of both primary and secondary source materials, including theoretical essays

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 60% Individual Presentation (10 minutes)

Component 2 - 40% Proposal (750 words)

WRITING AND LOCATION


MODULE TITLE : WRITING AND LOCATION

MODULE CODE : ENU507


MODULE SUMMARY :

This innovative module focuses on site-specific creative writing. Students take part in a short residential retreat and site-linked activities encourage the students to respond to locations in a variety of creative modes and genres. Modes of writing explored may include note-taking in a specific location, walking as creative practice, writing as environmental activism, and writing as installation. Students are introduced to interdisciplinary ways of working, intersecting with visual arts practice (writing installations) and ecology (writing as environmental activism). Students also have the opportunity to explore the genres of nature writing, new nature writing, innovative poetry and performance. Key elements of this module are delivered through field-work in a residential location. This module also aims to build skills in the autonomous methods of working required by the creative writer and wide independent reading is encouraged as well as a focused approach to the retreat which enables students to make the most of this unique immersive writing experience. 

Note: this module can be taken by students who choose to spend some of their time studying their subject abroad.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Further develop students’ knowledge and understanding of a range of creative genres;
  • Develop students’ abilities to produce creative texts in response to particular contexts and to promote an understanding of the relationship between creative writing and other disciplines such as art and ecology;
  • Further develop students’ experience and understanding of the various stages of the writing process with a particular focus on: the importance of the writer’s journal as a repository for ‘on the spot’ observations and notes; collaboration with others through workshops; and editing work as a result of feedback;
  • Develop students’ awareness of the wider writing community and of career opportunities afforded by site-specific or community-based writing projects and residencies.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate engagement in various stages of the writing process; including the gathering of ideas in a writer’s journal in response to their surroundings;
  • Develop the capacity for independent thought as linked to the authenticity, originality and inventiveness of their writing, and the ability to take calculated and contextualised risks in the pursuit of this aim;
  • Demonstrate awareness of the distinctive literary and linguistic characteristics of genres and the ability to employ these in their writing;
  • Demonstrate a developing ability to employ various structural and stylistic effects in their own writing, matching aspects of form and content to factors such as genre and context;
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in specific contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the different contexts (historical/ cultural/ geographical/ economic/ political/ social) which can influence the form and interpretation of texts;
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the wider writing community and of career opportunities afforded by site-specific or community-based writing projects and residencies;
  • Act independently, manage own time, and plan and organise projects to meet specified targets.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Writing Portfolio (4000 words)

POETRY AND PROSE


MODULE TITLE : POETRY TO PROSE

MODULE CODE : ENU515


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module builds students' skills in the key genres of poetry and prose. Following on from the basic generic conventions of both genres studied at level 4, this module focuses on the more experimental contemporary forms of writing in these genres. In poetry, this includes innovative forms and writing strategies such as cut-up, collage and sound poetry. In prose, this includes non-linear narrative structures and very short forms such as ‘flash’ fiction and ‘flash’ nonfiction. Elements of play and risk-taking inform this module which aims to build students’ knowledge of, and confidence in writing in, non-traditional forms. 

Note: this module can be taken by students who choose to spend some of their time studying their subject abroad.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Further develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the key genres of poetry and prose;
  • Develop students' ability to reflect on their own writing and that of others in a workshop   environment;
  • Develop students' ability to reflect on their writing practice;
  • Develop students' capacity for independent thought and originality and authenticity in writing;
  • Familiarise students with a range of literature from different historical periods and cultures relating to the module's themes;
  • Develop students’ ability to respond to such literature both creatively and critically.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the two key creative genres of poetry and prose;
  • Demonstrate a developing ability to employ various structural and stylistic effects in their own writing, matching aspects of form and content to factors such as genre and context;
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in specific contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
  • Demonstrate a developed understanding of the various stages of the writing process;
  • Develop the capacity for independent thought as linked to the authenticity, originality and inventiveness of their writing, and the ability to take calculated and contextualised risks in the pursuit of this aim;
  • Demonstrate familiarity with a range of literature from different historical periods and cultures relating to the module's themes;
  • Develop students ability to respond to such literature both creatively and critically.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (4000 words)

SHAKESPEARE AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES - optional module


MODULE TITLE : SHAKESPEARE AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES

MODULE CODE : ENU503


MODULE SUMMARY :

Students will be introduced to a range of early modern texts focussing on drama but also including prose and poetry. The module is intended to introduce students to the variety and richness of early modern literature and to the different dramatic genres of comedy, tragedy and history. Thematically, the module will explore issues of identity in the early modern period including such issues as gender, sexuality, race, social class, nationality, religion, interiority and kingship. Students will both contextualise early modern writing within its own period and learn to apply relevant theoretical and critical approaches such as feminist, psychoanalytical, gender studies, new historicist and cultural materialist theories of criticism. The module also introduces students to writing reviews of productions. Students will write a critical essay but will also see a live production of one of the plays studied and write a review of it. This contrast of writing forms is intended to help students understand the different expectations of different forms and to learn to write both in a concise way in the review and in a more structured and extended form in the essay.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 44.00
Independent : 156.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Help students gain a detailed knowledge of a substantial range of texts written by Shakespeare and his near contemporaries in the early modern period
  • Help students' gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the historical, cultural and social contexts in which the texts were produced and how these can affect their interpretation
  • Develop students' ability to think critically about literature from the period and to write about it in ways that are structured, reflective and analytical
  • Develop students' knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically a range of theoretical approaches to texts, such as New Historicism, Cultural Materialism and those pertaining to issues of identity
  • Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of secondary critical material and resources such as JSTOR, Project Muse, the internet
  • Ensure students see at least one live performance of a play from the Renaissance period.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Gain a detailed knowledge of a substantial range of texts from the renaissance
  • Gain a detailed knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts of the production of texts from the renaissance
  • Develop their knowledge and understanding of a range of theoretical approaches to texts, especially those pertaining to issues of identity
  • Apply a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of texts from the renaissance
  • Develop their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured
  • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material
  • Develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 30% Critical Review of a Theatrical Production (1500 words)

Component 2 - 70% Essay (3000 words)

ANALYSING TEXT AND TALK - optional module


MODULE TITLE : ANALYSING TEXT AND TALK

MODULE CODE : ENU504


MODULE SUMMARY :

This course covers theories and methods for doing discourse analysis of written and spoken texts. The historical circumstances of different theories and methods as well as key empirical studies employing them will be covered, with an emphasis on understanding how different text types and circumstances require different methods. The course will also cover analysis of more recent text types, such as Internet chats and Facebook interaction, with the goal of situating discourse analysis in students’ day-to-day interaction. Among the forms of analysis, corpus linguistics, conversation analysis, and cohesion analysis will be covered, with discussion about the particular strengths and weaknesses of each method. Students will develop an appreciation for the different approaches to analysis of different text types, and engage in their own small-scale studies of written and/or spoken texts.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Help students gain a detailed knowledge of the field of discourse analysis, with an appreciation for the different approaches to discourse applied by scholars in different areas of linguistics
  • Develop students' knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically a range of theoretical approaches to discourse analysis and how they influence fields of language study, such as Corpus Linguistics and Conversation Analysis
  • Help students' gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of how linguists investigate the meanings of texts and talk in particular historical, cultural and social contexts
  • Develop students' ability to think critically about language and to write about it in ways that are structured, reflective and analytical
  • Evaluate systematically and critically the distinctions among different text types;
  • Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of resources including linguistic texts and journal articles
  • Ensure students have a clear, comprehensive declarative knowledge of discourse analysis, equipping them to do their own analyses.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Develop their knowledge and understanding of how linguistics is used to describe and analyse the social world
  • Gain a knowledge and understanding of a range of theoretical approaches to language analysis and how these theories affect methodology
  • Gain a detailed knowledge of a range of approaches to discourse analysis, as well as the appropriacy of different approaches in different settings
  • Apply a range of critical approaches to language analysis, with a focus on students’ own interests
  • Develop their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation of work in discourse analysis, while appreciating the complexities with which the term ‘discourse analysis’ is used in different settings
  • Produce their own small-scale analysis of discourse, with a focus on the applying their chosen method in a reliable and consistent way
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured
  • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy in terms of their own analysis, by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to  meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances
  • To collaborate productively with others in research, negotiation, problem solving, writing, and presentation skills to an advanced level
  • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

VICTORIAN LITERATURE ON SCREEN - optional module


MODULE TITLE : VICTORIAN LITERATURE ON SCREEN

MODULE CODE : ENU506


MODULE SUMMARY :

In this module, students will study theories and approaches related to text- to- screen adaptations with a particular focus on the ways in which canonical Victorian novels and narrative poems have been translated for film and television. They will explore the workings of prose in relation to visual narratives, concentrating on the differences between the two media. They will examine the debates about whether film adaptations should be judged according to their fidelity to the source text and how far it is useful to read them as successful or unsuccessful depending on how particular directors have illuminated or even obscured the ‘meaning’ of source texts in their film interpretations. They will be encouraged to see textual analysis as part of a wider consideration of cultural history through a study of how films and TV productions from 1940 to the present day have variously interpreted the issues of Victorian identity inscribed within their sources, and particularly how they have represented nineteenth century conceptions of cultural power, faith and human psychology. Following a study of specific film adaptations, students will analyse a Victorian text and film adaptation or adaptations of their choice.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Help students gain a detailed knowledge of a substantial range of Victorian texts and their film adaptations
  • Help students' gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the historical, cultural and social contexts in which the literature was written and the film adaptations produced and how these can affect their interpretation
  • Develop students' ability to think critically about Victorian Literature and film adaptations and to write about it in ways that are structured, reflective and analytical
  • Develop students' knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically a range of theoretical approaches to Victorian literature and film adaptations including adaptation theory, New Historicism and Cultural Materialism
  • Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of secondary critical material and resources such as JSTOR, Project Muse and the internet
  • Explore the relationship between literature and film, with a focus on the different conventions through which meaning is generated within these two forms.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Gain a detailed knowledge of a substantial range of Victorian texts and their film adaptations
  • Gain a detailed knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts in which the literature was written and the film adaptations produced
  • Develop their knowledge and understanding of a range of range of theoretical approaches to Victorian literature and film adaptations including adaptation theory, New Historicism and Cultural Materialism
  • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary characteristics of nineteenth-century literature and the audio and visual characteristics of different film and TV adaptations
  • Gain a detailed knowledge of the relationship between literature and film
  • Recognise the relationship between literature and film
  • Apply a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of Victorian texts and their film adaptations
  • Develop their ability to use critical and analytical terminology associated with literature and film and appropriate scholarly citation
  • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of generic conventions of Victorian literature and film adaptations and the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured
  • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material
  • Develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to  meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Essay (4500 words)

CHILDREN'S LITERATURE - optional module


Children's Literature


Module Title: Children's Literature

Module Code: ENU517

Module Summary:
Students will be introduced to a range of written, visual and oral texts drawn from different genres within Children’s Literature. These will include picture books, fairy stories and traditional stories, stories from other cultures, classics, social realism and possibly some poetry. The different stylistic feature will be considered in relation to reaching judgements about literary qualities and suitability for child readers. Students will consider how it is possible for an adult writer to communicate effectively with the child reader. This work will include a consideration of how texts manage to retain their popularity with succeeding generations and will link with discussions on the nature and construction of childhood in different historical contexts. Students will apply theoretical perspectives to these texts as well as giving particular attention to the thematic issues addressed and the stylistic features employed. Issues and themes addressed will include such topics as 'children's' literature, 'adolescent' literature, the creation of narrative through images and the relationship of text and image, and issues of identity such as the family, gender, race, social class, childhood and parenthood. Students will also contextualise their discussions by considering a range of cultural, historical, ideological, and social contexts. The module will aim to bring at least one published children's author to talk to the students on the module.

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 36
Independent: 164
Placement: 0
Total: 200

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to:

• Help students gain a detailed knowledge of a wide range of children's literature;
• Help students' gain a wide-ranging and detailed knowledge and understanding of a variety of contexts (including, social, historical, economic, political, philosophical and ideological contexts) in which the texts were written and produced and how these can affect their interpretation;
• Help students gain a detailed appreciation of the range of issues addressed by writers of literature for children;
• Give students a detailed understanding of the issues involved in the act of communication between an adult writer and a child reader.
• Help students gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the generic conventions of children's literature and the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts;
• Develop in students advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
• Develop in students an advanced level of knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically a range of theoretical approaches to children's literature;
• Help students apply advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level.

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

• Gain a detailed knowledge of a wide range of children's literature;
• Gain a detailed knowledge of the various contexts in which children's literature was written and produced and how these can affect their interpretation;
• Develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of the generic conventions of children's literature and of the range of issues addressed by writers of literature for children;
• Develop a detailed understanding of theoretical approaches to texts and of the issues involved in the act of communication between an adult writer and a child reader
• Apply a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of children's literature;
• Help students gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the generic conventions of children's literature and the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts;
• Develop in students an advanced level of knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically and use appropriately a range of theoretical approaches to children's literature;
• Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
• Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from a wide range of sources and to synthesise such material;
• Develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

Assessment:

Component 1: 100% Essay (4,500 words)

CREATIVE NON-FICTION - optional module


Creative Non-Fiction


Module Title: Creative Non-Fiction

Module Code: ENU518

Module Summary: This module will introduce students to traditional and contemporary modes of creative non-fiction. Students will be encouraged to explore and experiment with new forms and subjects in their writing through a series of structured activities which will include the analysis of published texts and focused research and writing to a specified brief. Students will be introduced to ways in which literary techniques and structures can transform facts drawn from their own experience and from background research into creative non-fictional forms. The text-types studied on this module will include various forms of life writing (autobiography, personal essays, blogs) and travel writing. The module will further develop the students’ ability to engage productively in the various stages of the writing process.

Note: this module can be taken by students who choose to spend some of their time studying their subject abroad.

Semester of Delivery: 2

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 36
Independent: 164
Placement: 0
Total: 200

Programmes for which this Module is Mandatory: None

Programmes where this Module may be taken as an Option:
BA (Honours) Single Honours Creative Writing
BA (Honours) Single Honours English and Creative Writing

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to:
• Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of a range of creative non-fiction genres (including autobiography, personal essays, travel writing);
• Develop students’ ability to analyse the ways in which ‘facts’ (drawn from personal experience or focused research) can be creatively transformed for publication using literary techniques and structures;
• Develop students’ understanding of the ethics and intersectionality involved in writing about self and others;
• Develop students’ abilities to create creative non-fiction texts employing appropriate structural and stylistic features;
• Further develop students’ experience and understanding of the various stages of the writing process including: writing to a brief, focused research and observation, drafting, revision and editing and collaborative workshop feedback and reflection.

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:
• Demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of a range of creative non-fiction genres;
• Demonstrate their understanding of the ways in which various literary techniques and structures can be employed to transform facts into creative non-fiction;
• Engage in various stages of the development of creative non-fiction, including background research, writing to a brief, planning, drafting, revision and editing and responding to and providing workshop feedback ;
• Produce non-fiction texts which employ appropriate structural and stylistic features;
• Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in response to specific contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
• Act independently, manage own time, and plan and organise projects to meet specified targets;
• Reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

Assessment:
Component 1: 100% Writing Portfolio (4000 words)


WRITING FOR RADIO - optional module


Writing for Radio


Module Title: Writing for Radio

Module Code: ENU519

Module Summary:

This module introduces students to key techniques involved in writing for radio and to the particular qualities and requirements of this distinctive medium. Seminars provide opportunities for engaging with a range of radio shows and learning how to present a script, while workshops allow students the chance to develop their writing through peer and tutor feedback. Techniques such as monologue, dialogue, voice over, intimacy, sound and silence will be considered, as students develop the skills required to write their own radio scripts. There will also be consideration of the commissioning process for radio scripts and an emphasis on listening widely to a range of radio programmes to aid immersion in the medium.

Note: this module can be taken by students who choose to spend some of their time studying their subject abroad.

Semester of Delivery: 2

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 36
Independent: 164 hours
Total: 200

Programmes for which this Module is Mandatory: None

Programmes where this Module may be taken as an Option:
BA (Honours) Single Honours Creative Writing

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to:
• Develop students’ awareness of the distinctive qualities of the radio medium;
• Develop students’ ability to reflect on how their writing is suitable for the radio medium;
• Develop students’ ability to plan, develop and write a radio script;
• Develop students’ awareness of the commissioning process and presentation of scripts;
• Develop students' ability to reflect on their own writing and that of others in a workshop environment;
• Develop students' ability to reflect on their writing practice;
• Develop students' capacity for independent thought and originality and authenticity in writing.

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:
• Demonstrate their awareness of the key genre of radio scripts;
• Demonstrate a developing ability to employ various structural and stylistic effects in their own writing, matching aspects of form and content to factors such as genre and context;
• Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in specific contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
• Demonstrate a developed awareness of the various stages of the writing process;
• Develop the capacity for independent thought as linked to the authenticity, originality and inventiveness of their writing, and the ability to take calculated and contextualised risks in the pursuit of this aim;
• Demonstrate familiarity with a range of radio scripts from different historical periods and cultures relating to the module's themes;
• Demonstrate the ability to respond to such scripts both creatively and critically.

Component 1: 100% Portfolio (10 page radio script and 1000 word commentary)


Year 3 modules


WRITING A NOVEL - optional module


Writing a Novel


Module Title: Writing a Novel

Module Code: ENU616

Module Summary: This module builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier modules and requires students to take a more autonomous approach to their own writing development. While earlier modules have offered a focus on prose, this module deals specifically with the novel. The prose writing skills gained on previous modules are here tailored for the purposes of planning and writing a novel and students are expected to start this module already equipped with an idea for the novel they wish to produce. Positioned at level 6, this module also includes a focus on career development, with attention given to identifying markets for the writing and guidance on how to put together a publishing proposal. Delivery is through a blend of seminars and workshops which provide opportunities for writing and publishing guidance. Students are expected to work independently on their writing between sessions and participate actively in workshops. The module also features contact with industry professionals through visiting writers.

Semester of Delivery: 2

CATS Value: 20

ECTS Value: 10

Contact Hours:

Scheduled: 36
Independent: 164
Placement: 0
Total: 200

Programmes for which this Module is Mandatory: None

Programmes where this Module may be taken as an Option:
BA (Honours) Single Honours Creative Writing

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to:

• Encourage students to exercise a greater ways degree of autonomy in regard to the development of their own writing;
• Offer students the opportunity to develop their writing skills in the genre of the novel;
• Extend students’ experience of collaborating in workshops and reflecting on their own writing practice and that of others;
• Extend students’ capacity for independent thought as linked to the authenticity, originality and inventiveness of their writing;
• Encourage students to develop advanced research skills, including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate, interpret and synthesise complex information.
• Encourage students to increase employability through increased awareness of the publishing industry.

Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

• Demonstrate an in-depth and coherent knowledge and understanding of the stylistic and structural features of the novel;
• Demonstrate advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in specific contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
• Demonstrate an increased capacity for independent thought as linked to the authenticity, originality and inventiveness of their writing, and the ability to take calculated and contextualised risks in the pursuit of this aim;
• Demonstrate an increased awareness of the position of their own creative practice within existing traditions and contemporary writing;
• Demonstrate a mature and perceptive understanding of their own areas of strength and weakness as writers;
• Show increased autonomy in the development of their own writing, focusing on particular areas of interest and expertise and carrying out any necessary background research;
• Reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performance.

Assessment:
Component 1: 100% Writing Portfolio (4500 words)

DISSERTATION IN ENGLISH - optional module


MODULE TITLE : DISSERTATION IN ENGLISH

MODULE CODE : ENU601


MODULE SUMMARY :

The dissertation allows students to undertake a sustained piece of independent research into a topic of their own choosing, and to apply the concepts, theories and methodologies (as relevant) that they have learnt about during their degree. Students can choose to work in the areas of Creative Writing, English literature, English language, Film Studies or Literature and Film; their research should show a grounding in current research and establish clear lines of original enquiry. Research skills specific to the module will be practised in a series of workshops towards the beginning of the module (time management; working with a supervisor; identifying strengths and area for development); thereafter, students will be supported by an individual supervisor with whom they will arrange individual tutorials.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 10.00
Independent : 390.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  400.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Enable students to gain an in-depth knowledge of a specific area of English studies in which they are particularly interested;
  • Teach students to develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary, linguistic and/or visual characteristics of genres, methods and/or theoretical approaches relevant to their dissertation;
  • Teach students how to choose and apply relevant methods and/or critical approaches independently in their close reading and analysis of texts;
  • Use the required institutional scholarly citation and referencing system accurately.
  • Allow student to show their achievement in using advanced literacy and communication skills which produce work that is coherently structured to produce a clear argument or evaluation, written in a scholarly way, including the use of critical, analytical and theoretical terminology;
  • Allow students to show their ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level;
  • Develop, in students, an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, and act independently as appropriate; independently research including scoping and planning a project, developing an appropriate reading list to support the project; manage their time, plan and organise their workload to  meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning;
  • Allow students to identify career opportunities and reflect critically on the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Gain an in-depth knowledge of a specific area of English studies;
  • Develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary, linguistic and/or visual characteristics of genres, methods and/or theoretical approaches relevant to their dissertation;
  • Apply relevant methods and/or critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of texts;
  • Use the required institutional scholarly citation and referencing system accurately.
  • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills which produce work that is coherently structured to produce a clear argument or evaluation, written in a scholarly way, including the use of critical, analytical and theoretical terminology;
  • Show their ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level;
  • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, and act independently as appropriate; independently research including scoping and planning a project, developing an appropriate reading list to support the project; manage their time, plan and organise their workload to  meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning;
  • Ability to identify career opportunities and reflect critically on the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 15% Presentation (5 minutes)

Component 2 - 85% Dissertation (10000 words)

PROFESSIONAL PORTFOLIO 1


MODULE TITLE : PROFESSIONAL PORTFOLIO 1

MODULE CODE : ENU612


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier modules and requires students to take a more autonomous approach to their own writing development. With tutorial help, they will each set up their own writing programme which will enable them to develop an extended piece of writing or a collection of shorter pieces in the theme and genre of their choice. Tutor-led workshops and tutorials will address areas of need identified by students. In the early part of the module students will, with some tutorial guidance, decide on a focus for their own writing portfolio; this may, for example, relate to the genres selected for development (e.g. autobiography; innovative poetry; site-specific performance; short story) or to the themes to be explored through writing. These early tutorials will encourage students to appraise their own progress in previous work and to set some targets for development. As the module progresses, students will be supported with sessions on time-management for writers, re-drafting and revision, and guided reading. Workshops, both face-to-face and online, provide the opportunity for constructive criticism on work-in-progress. Students will be expected to reflect on the ways in which their writing has evolved from early research through to final draft.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Encourage students to exercise a greater degree of autonomy in regard to the development of their own writing;
  • Offer students the opportunity to develop their own particular writing interests in extended writing projects;
  • Extend students’ experience of collaborating in workshops and reflecting on their own writing practice and that of others;
  • Extend students’ capacity for independent thought as linked to the authenticity, originality and inventiveness of their writing;
  • Encourage students to develop advanced research skills, including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate, interpret and synthesise complex information.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate an in-depth and coherent knowledge and understanding of the stylistic and structural features of the genre in which they are working;
  • Demonstrate advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in specific contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
  • Demonstrate an increased capacity for independent thought as linked to the authenticity, originality and inventiveness of their writing, and the ability to take calculated and contextualised risks in the pursuit of this aim;
  • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material in a creative manner;
  • Act independently, manage own time, and plan and organise projects to meet specified targets;
  • Demonstrate an increased awareness of the position of their own creative practice within existing traditions and contemporary writing;
  • Demonstrate a mature and perceptive understanding of their own areas of strength and weakness as writers;
  • Show increased autonomy in the development of their own writing, focusing on particular areas of interest and expertise and carrying out any necessary background research;
  • Reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performance.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Writing Portfolio (4500 words)

PROFESSIONAL PORTFOLIO 2


MODULE TITLE : PROFESSIONAL PORTFOLIO 2

MODULE CODE : ENU613


MODULE SUMMARY :

This last creative writing module, which is a follow-on module to ENU612, is designed to encourage students to look ahead to their professional writing life beyond university. As with ENU612, students will have the freedom to select the theme and genre of their choice for their writing portfolio. Additionally, students will explore the various routes by which their writing might be published, performed, or exhibited. Students will develop an increased understanding of various aspects of the publishing industry (e.g. where and how to promote and pitch work; how to prepare writing for submission; e-publishing). Other forms of career development for writers will also be explored (e.g. writing in the community, teaching creative writing; writer in residence roles). Using their own research and such guidance the students will develop their own Personal Development Plan (PDP). The PDP, which is based on the model developed by The Writer’s Compass (NAWE’s professional advisory service), will encourage students to set time-linked targets for their next steps as writers. By the end of the module each student should have shared a piece of their portfolio writing with a wider writing community through means of publication, performance, or installation.  

 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop the students’ ability to employ various structural and stylistic effects in their own writing, matching aspects of form and content to factors such as genre and context;
  • Develop the students’ literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in a range of contexts;
  • Develop the students’ ability to engage in a productive and professional manner in the processes of the revision and editing of their writing;
  • Enable students to develop skills of an increasingly sophisticated nature in research and organization;
  • Further develop the students’ knowledge of the wider writing community (e.g. creative organisations; local writing groups; resource bases; publishing opportunities; writing awards and competitions);
  • Prepare students for employment by offering them the opportunity to identify career opportunities (e.g. routes for publication and a range of different writer roles) and reflect on the attributes, skills, attitudes or approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers.

 

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate an advanced ability to employ various structural and stylistic effects in their own writing, matching aspects of form and content to factors such as genre and context;
  • Demonstrate advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in a range of contexts;
  • Demonstrate a developed knowledge of the wider writing community (e.g. creative organisations; local writing groups; resource bases; publishing opportunities; writing awards and competitions);
  • Demonstrate an ability to engage with the wider writing community and to promote their own writing;
  • Demonstrate an increased capacity for independent thought and judgment in critical and creative practice;
  • Demonstrate an ability to engage in a productive and professional manner in the processes of revision and editing and to produce copy that follows appropriate conventions (e.g. publishers’ conventions; competition requirements);
  • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material;
  • Act independently, manage own time, and plan and organise projects to meet specified targets and deadlines;
  • To identify career opportunities and reflect on the attributes, skills, attitudes or approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Writing Portfolio (4500 words)

WRITING FOR THEATRE


MODULE TITLE : WRITING FOR THEATRE

MODULE CODE : DRU604


MODULE SUMMARY :

The module will focus on developing the students’ understanding of dramatic structure, their use of basic devising techniques, and their experience of the creative process in devising and / or writing a piece of original theatre.  The teaching sessions will be a combination of the study of dramatic structure, creative writing linked to playwriting, and the development of the student’s own dramatizations.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Deepen students’ understanding of the historical forms and structures of drama
  • Examine the historic and contemporary theories of dramatic structure from a writer’s perspective
  • Introduce students to play texts which exemplify key structural features
  • Further explore the relationship between dramatic structure and text
  • Explore basic devising techniques
  • Develop and experiment with students’ creative writing skills

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

  • Analyse and demonstrate how key writers have impacted on the development of dramatic structure
  • Analyse and show how critical perspectives are related to different uses of structure.
  • Analyse the construction of a dramatic text
  • Analyse and account for the impact of structure on the dramatic possibilities of script.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Treatment and Script Extract for Play, supported by Essay (3000 words)

NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT - optional module


MODULE TITLE : NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT

MODULE CODE : PLU601


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module offers students the opportunity to build on their level 5 work placement through the more developed application of a negotiated work-based research project. Students will agree with their placement tutor and workplace mentor a brief for a project which addresses a need within the organisation. Learners should complete a minimum of 100 hours in the work place. It is in the spirit of this module that wherever possible, the focus will be on social or community / sustainable development.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 276.00
Placement : 100.00
Total :  400.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Enable students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing a negotiated work-based research project

  • Encourage students to use appropriate work-based research methods

  • Enable students to work collaboratively in a work setting, establishing continuity from their previous work placement and offering tangible evidence of building on this prior experience, where possible

  • Generate confidence and security in students’ employability on graduation

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Secure, negotiate and design a work-based research project

  • Develop an understanding of, and apply, research methods that are appropriate to work-based contexts

  • Interpret gathered information

  • Make a clear and productive contribution to the organization through the development of recommendations arising from the work-based research project

  • Present a creatively engaging argument

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT (8000 WORDS)

Course code


.

W800

Applications for full-time courses are made through UCAS.

Applications for flexible learning courses are made via Newman.

For all enquiries relating to admissions or entry requirements, email us at admissions@newman.ac.uk

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