Working with Children, Young People and Families / International Social Work BA (Hons)

Course length: 3 and a half years full-time, with 2 semesters spent in Germany at the University of Applied Social Science, Ludwigsberg.

Overview

Why study Working with Children, Young People and Families/International Social Work?

This is a unique dual award course that provides the opportunity to look at issues around children and young people from an international perspective as the programme is 3 and a half years long with two semesters spent in Germany. There is no need to speak another language before the start of the programme as all teaching is in English, though you will be encouraged to learn German during the programme.

 This course is unique and has been developed from two highly successful programmes in the partner universities; The BA WCYPF is one of a small number of Honours degree level programmes designed to give you the knowledge and skills to understand the social, economic, educational, political and cultural issues and barriers facing children, young people and families, those who are for a variety of reasons disadvantaged. The International Social Work Programme in Ludwigsburg is also distinguished by its explicitly international focus and commitment to social justice.

Professionals working with children and young people are increasingly required to have formal qualifications recognising their expertise in these areas. The dual award will confer an international qualification in Applied Social Work, with which may be able to be credited towards professional recognition in the UK.

What does the course cover?

The course looks at social policy relating to children and families both nationally and internationally, and gives you a thorough understanding of the roles and responsibilities of agencies working with children and families. You will examine issues around how we understand childhood, family relationships and the relationship between children, families and formal and informal services with the unique opportunity to compare policy and practice in different countries. You will explore how societies view childhood, and the challenging issues facing children and young people, historically, today, and in the future. 

You will study legislation relating to education, child protection and welfare, health, and diversity. As multi-agency working is essential for the effective support of children and families you will study and evaluate models of professional working and collaboration. You will also explore the area of professional judgement and how this is influenced by arrange of factors. A major theme throughout the course will be listening to children and young people, making services responsive and developing strategies to enhance children’s and young people’s participation.

What makes this course distinctive?

This is a unique programme that gives you the opportunity to study in the UK and Germany including an international placement.

The tutors on this course have significant experience of public policy and practice. Many are leading experts in their field with national and international profiles in the area. The course provides an opportunity to cover a range of issues and you will be encouraged to develop an area of particular expertise. 

All single and combined Honours students at Newman undertake relevant placements as part of their degree, therefore full-time students can gain valuable work experience in a relevant setting and apply the theoretical knowledge gained on the course to real-life scenarios under the supervision of experienced practitioners. Relevant work experience at a high level is essential for people intending to develop their careers in this area. This is why this course has been designed to enable you to gain experience throughout your studies, which will be useful when you are seeking positions after graduation. For part-time students already working in the field the degree ensures that you are aware of the latest developments, cases and practices, and are able to relate this information to your current role or career aspirations.

How will I be assessed?

The course offers a variety of assessment to suit the experience of the module studied, and will include essays, presentations and case studies.

What careers can I consider after this degree?

A wide range of careers are available across a number of environments such as education, health and social care in the public, private and third sectors. It may be possible to qualify as a social worker after this programme as long as other requirements are met. Youth work, social policy development, family support outreach work and working with children are also potential careers for graduates of this degree.

It is intended that graduates from this course will develop into practitioners and managers working in education, health, or social care or other related areas bringing with them the unique perspective gained from this course.

Link to   University of Applied Social Science, Ludwigsberg, Germany  web page


Newman University would like to draw your attention to our Academic Regulations. These regulations are your Terms of Reference and should be considered when making a decision to study with our institution.

Entry requirements

September 2018 Entry Requirements

You must achieve either at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma), or a total of 88 points from a maximum of 3 A levels.

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9 M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

5 GCSEs at grade C or above including English or a recognised equivalent, are also required.

If your work placement involves working with children or vulnerable adults a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance and is required before starting any work placement.

Fees

2017/18*
Full-time Home/EU students:  £9,250 

Please note for 2018/19 the University reserves the right to increase fees broadly in line with increases in inflation, or to reflect changes in government funding policies or changes agreed by Parliament.

Finance and Scholarship information

Additional costs:

A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is not required for entry into this programme, although it is in many cases required by employers before students can begin their Year 2 (level 5) work placement.  The cost of the DBS is currently £55 (including processing fee) with the option of subscribing to the update service which is currently £13 per year.  For more information on your DBS application please click here.

The fees stated are tuition fees only and do not include: travel to and from and accommodation whilst at, the University of Applied Social Science, Ludwigsberg.  Estimated costs (2017/18) are outlined below:

Estimated return flight from Birmingham International Airport - £230

Estimated accommodation - £1,200

Estimated living costs - £1,300

As a full time student, you will study a total of 120 credits each year. Credits are made up of mandatory modules and you may have a list of optional modules to choose from. Not every programme offers optional modules and when an optional module is available it will be clearly marked. All modules are listed below and you may not be required to complete all of these modules. Most modules are 20 credits and dissertations are 40 credits. Please note that not all optional modules run every year. For further information please email admissions@newman.ac.uk.

Year 1 modules


INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING


INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING: details currently unavailable

THE INCLUSIVE PRACTITIONER


MODULE TITLE : THE INCLUSIVE PRACTITIONER

MODULE CODE : WWU401


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will encourage students to think about the centrality of inclusive practice and how this is influenced by practitioners’ own value base. It will look at how and why children, young people and families can become socially excluded and will look at the implications for inclusive practitioners.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 48.00
Independent : 152.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Explore the complexity of personal and professional values
  • Explore principles underpinning Human Rights and Social Justice
  • Provide an introduction to the range of factors which can lead to people being socially excluded
  • Provide an introduction to the historical and current social inclusion debate

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Understand the complexity of personal and professional values in influencing how we approach practice  
  • Be aware of the value base which supports inclusive practice
  • Begin to evaluate research in relation to practice
  • Work collaboratively with colleagues in identifying and planning inclusive strategies for children, young people and families

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Group Seminar Discussion (20 minutes)

Component 2 - 50% Individual Reflective Account (1500 words)

THE SOCIOLOGICAL IMAGINATION


MODULE TITLE : THE SOCIOLOGICAL IMAGINATION

MODULE CODE : WWU404


MODULE SUMMARY :

Sociological concepts underpin our understandings of society, communities and families. This module will explore the sociological imagination by applying key theories to examples in contemporary society. The module will include examinations of classical sociological theorists including Marx, Durkheim and Weber as well as more contemporary sociology including Critical Race Theory, Feminist Perspectives and Postmodern approaches. The module will also consider the role of the media and discourse in shaping understandings and also critiques of the sociological canon as gendered and Eurocentric.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Explore and critique key theoretical concepts in sociology.
  • Apply sociological concepts to understanding society
  • Engage in a critical analysis of constructions of the family and community in relation to sociological concepts
  • Examine the role the media and discourse have in shaping understandings of society.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Critical examine sociological theory using contemporary examples.
  • Critically evaluate the role of the media and discourse in influencing concepts of society.
  • Critique the sociological canon.
  • Sociologically critique conceptions of the family and community.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Group Presentation (15 minutes)

Component 2 - 60% Essay (2000 words)

AN INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL POLICY


MODULE TITLE : AN INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL POLICY

MODULE CODE : WWU405


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will examine some of the over-arching social policy issues that shape the working agenda around children, young people and families. To do this it will be structured around the key issues identified by William Beveridge as the ‘giants’ of social policy – education, poverty, housing, health (including safeguarding and protection of the vulnerable) and work. These topics will be analysed in the context of the challenges that face professionals working within the current model of the welfare state.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims: 

  • To (begin to) equip students with skills to analyse policy
  • To provide students with a clear understanding of the origins of the welfare state
  • To allow students to examine the impact of poverty and deprivation on CYPF
  • To explore the way key services are structured and delivered
  • To examine the direction of travel in which the welfare state is being taken and to look at alternative models of welfare delivery

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Develop a better understanding of the role of social policy as a discipline
  • Understand the historical backdrop to the development of the welfare state
  • Understand how key areas of social policy are determined by their relationship to the welfare state
  • Be able to focus on specific arenas of policy development and delivery – e.g. education, health or housing
  • Begin to analyse the impact of the wider social policy environment on the design and delivery of services to CYPF
  • Be steered towards key thinkers and writers in this field.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 30% Timeline (1500 words)

Component 2 - 70% Essay (2500 words)

THE INFORMED PRACTITIONER


THE INFORMED PRACTITIONER: details currently unavailable

RISK, VULNERABILITY AND PROFESSIONAL JUDGEMENT


RISK, VULNERABILITY AND PROFESSIONAL JUDGEMENT: details currently unavailable

UNDERSTANDING THE LAW AND ITS RELEVANCE TO SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE


MODULE TITLE : UNDERSTANDING THE LAW AND ITS RELEVANCE TO SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE: NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES

MODULE CODE : WWU409


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module includes a basic understanding of the law in terms of how laws are made, the different types of law, and the various court levels. Attention will also be drawn to particular Case Law and Statutory guidance. Central to this module will be an understanding of concepts such as welfare and vulnerability, introducing statutory definitions and guidance relating to child and adult protection, safeguarding, equalities and rights based legislation. The module will include comparisons of practice in UK, Germany and Europe.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Provide students with an understanding of legal processes and relevant legislation, nationally and internationally.

  • To begin to analyse concepts such as welfare and vulnerability as these relate to legislation.

To be able to compare different legal approaches to child protection, adult protection, safeguarding, equalities and human rights.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

  • Understand how laws are created, the different types of law and levels of court 

  • Have some insight regarding processes and practices in different countries

Have knowledge of the specific laws and policies relevant to social work practice nationally and internationally

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% ESSAY 2,000 WORDS

Course code


L540

Applications via UCAS

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Single Honours: 100% Working with Children Young People and Families / International Social Work (dual award)

UCAS code: L540

Applications via UCAS

For all enquiries relating to admissions or entry requirements, email us at admissions@newman.ac.uk

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