Psychology BSc (Hons)

Course length: 3 years full-time 4 years part-time (for further information on part-time courses available click here)

Overview

What does the course cover?

Psychology is the study of human behaviour. It explores a wide range of fascinating areas from how we think and how we see other people, to how children develop, how relationships are formed, and how we can help people in distress. Psychology is useful because whatever you intend to do in life will involve trying to understand and deal with other people. Studying Psychology at Newman provides you with a solid grounding in all core areas of psychology, but with particular strengths in considering how psychology is applied to the ‘real world’. Many of our lecturers have particular specialisms in applied psychology, and this gives this degree programme its distinctive approach and appeal.

What is noteworthy about this course?

The course will enable you to explore these areas of human behaviour and teach you to reach valid conclusions based on scientific underpinnings.

On the programme you will be introduced to the five major strands of psychology, which are individual differences, cognition, development, biopsychology and social psychology, plus research methods. You can expect to deepen your understanding of these areas as you progress through the programme. In your final year you study a range of topics covering the applications of psychology, such as education, clinical, health, counselling, and forensic psychology.

 
How will I be assessed?

The psychology degree programme uses a wide variety of forms of assessment, designed to help you develop a range of skills that will be invaluable in the modern professional work place. The assessment strategy for the degree includes traditional essays, exams, short notes and multiple ­choice tests. Also included in the strategy are less traditional assessments, such as designing a web page, Power Point presentations, writing dialogues and presenting portfolios. Finally, there are a variety of assessments linked to research, which include writing reports, giving conference style presentations, and writing a dissertation.

What careers could I consider?

Many Single Honours students aim to enter the various psychological professions, including clinical, occupational, educational, counselling, forensic, health and sport psychology. Students can also pursue an academic career, and may progress into a PhD. Psychology graduates can also progress into a variety of careers, typically in people-orientated and caring roles; for example, nursing, teaching, social work, human resources, marketing, software design, health research, or rehabilitation. Psychology graduates must be both literate and numerate and these are skills that employers demand in the modern professional work place.

What is GBC?
 

Newman University's Single Honours Psychology degree is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS), and students gaining at least a lower 2nd class honours degree gain Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the BPS.

In the United Kingdom, psychology degrees are regulated by the British Psychological Society. Only those degrees that meet a minimum standard, and are judged as providing a sound basis for progression into further post­graduate training in psychology, are accredited. Accredited courses are said to provide the Graduate Basis for Chartered membership (GBC).

"The course as a whole and its components in particular are well designed and involve a number of innovative elements …teaching quality is high."
External Examiner

 


Newman University would like to draw your attention to our Academic Regulations. These regulations are your Terms of Reference and should be considered when making a decision to study with our institution.

Entry requirements

September 2018 Entry Requirements

104 UCAS points, to include minimum grades of CC at A Level or equivalent (e.g. MM at BTEC Diploma) or 96 UCAS points from a maximum of 3 A Levels. 
As it is not possible to achieve 104 UCAS points through an Access course, Access students will need 106 UCAS points.

Access Students can achieve this with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course:
D27-M0-P18; D24-M6-P15; D21M12-P12; 
D18-M18-P9; D15 M24-P6; D12-M30-P3; 
D9-M36-P0

5 GCSEs at grade 4/C or above to include GCSE English and mathematics or recognised equivalents are also required.

Fees

Fees per academic year: 2017/18 

Full-time UK/EU Students: £9,250*

Part-time UK/EU Students: £4,950*

*Please note for 2018/19 the University reserves the right to increase fees broadly in line with increases in inflation, or to reflect changes in government funding policies or changes agreed by Parliament.

Finance and Scholarship information

Additional costs:

A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is not required for entry into this programme, although it is in many cases required by employers before students can begin their Year 2 (level 5) work placement.  The cost of the DBS is currently £55 (including processing fee) with the option of subscribing to the update service which is currently £13 per year.  For more information on your DBS application please click here.

As a full time student, you will study a total of 120 credits each year. Credits are made up of mandatory modules and you may have a list of optional modules to choose from. Not every programme offers optional modules and when an optional module is available it will be clearly marked. All modules are listed below and you may not be required to complete all of these modules. Most modules are 20 credits and dissertations are 40 credits. Please note that not all optional modules run every year. For further information please email admissions@newman.ac.uk.

Year 1 modules


INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING


INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING: details currently unavailable

PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS OF PSYCHOLOGY


MODULE TITLE : PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS OF PSYCHOLOGY

MODULE CODE : PYU401


MODULE SUMMARY :

Students will be introduced to the principles of psychology as both an academic and an applied discipline. Definitions of psychology will be considered, along with its claims to being an evidence-based science, and definitions of science and of empiricism will also be explored. Students will examine the methods used by psychologists, including an introduction to research and to the research cycle; empiricism and the scientific method; observation (measurement and sampling); explanation (e.g. correlation and causality; and the differences between quantitative and qualitative methods).

Alongside of this, the module will also examine the range of professional applications of psychology, the main roles and ways of working of psychologists working in these areas. It will also assess the role of evidence and of the scientific method in guiding the work of professionals in these areas, and the socio-political context within which professional psychologists work. Where relevant, the role and approach taken by the professional psychologist will be compared and contrasted with the role of allied professionals, such as counsellors, sports coaches and nurses. Routes to professional careers in psychology will also be considered, including the role of Graduate Basis for Chartership with the British Psychological Society.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 48.00
Independent : 152.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Introduce students to the discipline of psychology and to its guiding scientific principles
  • Introduce students to the key principles of research (e.g. the research cycle, variables and strategies of enquiry)
  • Develop students' understanding of the role of evidence-based practice in psychology
  • Introduce students to applications of psychology within real world contexts
  • Give students and understanding of the range of contexts in which psychologists work, and of the socio-political issues associated with these contexts

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Explore definitions and the underlying principles of psychology as an academic and applied discipline.
  • Display a scientific understanding of aspects of human behaviour and experience, and an awareness of the complex interaction between these.
  • Employ evidence-based reasoning to examine practical, theoretical and ethical issues associated with the use of differing methodologies, paradigms and methods of analysis in psychology.
  • Understand the range of professional applications of psychological knowledge and routes into these.
  • Understand the role of the BPS and of Graduate Basis for chartership as a basis for entry into professional training.
  • Consider the socio-political context in which professional psychologists work
  • Understand how psychological professions employ an evidence-based approach to practice
  • Analyse and evaluate a range of key research evidence in the field of Applied Psychology.  

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

Component 2 - 50% Essay (1500 words)

THE REFLECTIVE LEARNER IN PSYCHOLOGY AND COUNSELLING


MODULE TITLE : THE REFLECTIVE LEARNER IN PSYCHOLOGY AND COUNSELLING

MODULE CODE : PYU402


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will focus on the development of ethical, reflective and academic practice within psychology and counselling. The application of study skills such as referencing skills, group work, report and essay writing, will be enhanced. Students will evidence their personal development of learning through the application of psychological learning theories and concepts. The module will also aim to facilitate the development of students' psychological literacy and their understanding of the role that anxiety and stress can play as blocks to effective learning. Students will be required to reflect on their work in semester 1 and to produce an action plan related to achievement of personal goals and career development.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop ethical and reflective practice through the application of learning perspectives to studying a psychology degree
  • Develop students' psychological literacy
  • Develop understanding and application of group work skills
  • Develop report and essay writing skills
  • Introduce effective action planning for further personal and career development.
  • Develop IT confidence and skills relating to word processing, bibliographic databases and e portfolios.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Relate the main learning theoretical perspectives and examples of key research evidence in the field of Psychology to an understanding of their learning development
  • Employ evidence-based reasoning to examine practical, theoretical and ethical issues associated with students' learning process.
  • Discuss the extent to which psychological theories can explain, or provide solutions to enhance reflective independent learning.
  • Written and oral Communication: can communicate clearly, coherently, fluently and within a given structure, both in writing and orally.
  • Working with Others: work as part of a team, dividing tasks efficiently and employing group resources effectively.
  • Improving own learning and development (a) time management: successfully action plan, (b) autonomy : work autonomously, setting goals and deadlines as appropriate in order to complete set tasks, (c) problem solving: can solve problems by clarifying questions, considering alternative solutions and evaluating outcomes.
  • Information Technology: developing confident in use of IT including word processing, bibliographic databases, and e-portfolios.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% ePortfolio (2000 words or equivalent in multimedia content)

FOUNDATIONS OF PSYCHOLOGY


MODULE TITLE : FOUNDATIONS OF PSYCHOLOGY

MODULE CODE : PYU404


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module provides students with a broad introduction to the history of psychology as a scientific discipline. A number of different psychological perspectives will be introduced, for example, psychobiological, cognitive, behaviourist, psychodynamic, social constructionist, and students will be expected to apply and evaluate the application of such perspectives to important contemporary issues, such as drug addiction, violent behaviour, mental illness, etc. Research skills will be developed through the use of online databases and other library resources. Students will receive basic training in using Powerpoint to produce presentations, and in using the Library-based information resources.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Provide a broad introduction to psychology as a scientific discipline
  • Consider the historical origins of modern psychology
  • Introduce the student to a number of theoretical approaches
  • Illustrate how different approaches can be used to explain the same behaviour
  • Explore key issues and debates within psychology

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Describe the important antecedents contributing to the development of contemporary psychology
  • Apply psychological theories and evaluate research findings in applied contexts
  • Evaluate different psychological perspectives for an applied problem

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Lecture and Written Narration (15 minutes)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

CLASSIC STUDIES AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGY


MODULE TITLE : CLASSIC STUDIES AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGY

MODULE CODE : PYU405


MODULE SUMMARY :

This course will introduce students to a number of influential early studies, positions, debates, movements and controversies in psychology.  The module will demonstrate how these early studies, positions, debates, movements and controversies are still relevant to psychology today.  Students' understandings of these positions will be illustrated through reference to classic studies, debates and controversies on topics such as tyranny and the Stanford Prison Study, Milgram's 'obedience' studies, Social Learning, classical and operant conditioning and intelligence testing. Issues concerning the ethics of psychological experimentation will also be introduced, through consideration of ethical issues arising from classic studies. 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Introduce students to key debates, studies and controversies in the history of psychology. 
  • Demonstrate areas where these debates are still relevant to psychology today. 
  • Introduce students to ethical debates and concerns within psychology.
  • Introduce students to the skills of academic reading, note-taking, summarising, literature searching and critical evaluation.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Develop and demonstrate a knowledge and awareness of the core concepts, theories, models and research within psychology, and apply this to current topics.
  • Display a critical and self-reflective awareness of the ethical, sociocultural, and political issues evident across a range of psychological sub-domains.
  • Demonstrate an in depth, critical and analytical understanding of the importance and limitations of psychological research in understanding and explaining human behaviour. 
  • Demonstrate the ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing, and sustained argument, using a range of primary sources in from across all sub-disciplines of psychology, and use it to formulate arguments specific to the nature of Critical Psychological approaches.
  • Develop their skills of summarizing and critical evaluation.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (1500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Portfolio (2000 words)

RESEARCH DESIGN AND ANALYSIS 1


RESEARCH DESIGN AND ANALYSIS 1: details currently unavailable

GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES AND CONTEXTS IN PSYCHOLOGY


GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES AND CONTEXTS IN PSYCHOLOGY: details currently unavailable

Year 2 modules


WORK PLACEMENT


MODULE TITLE : WORK PLACEMENT

MODULE CODE : PLU502


MODULE SUMMARY :

This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 10.00
Independent : 90.00
Placement : 100.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement in a workplace setting.

  • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement and of their independent learning throughout the experience.

  • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.

  • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.

  • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to: 

  1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.

  2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.

  3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.

  4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - % PLACEMENT REGISTRATION FORM

Component 2 - 60% WORK PLACEMENT REFLECTION (2500 WORDS)

Component 3 - 40% WORK PLACEMENT EVALUATION: DIGITAL RESOURCE (1500 WORDS EQUIVALENT)

RESEARCH DESIGN AND ANALYSIS 2


MODULE TITLE : RESEARCH DESIGN AND ANALYSIS 2

MODULE CODE : PYU501


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will build on foundation level modules to enhance knowledge of research methodology and analysis, and will focus upon quantitative and qualitative approaches. 

Students will develop their knowledge and understanding of both the quantitative and qualitative research process, focusing on methodology and analysis. In quantitative methods, they will be introduced to surveys and questionnaire methods, and explore the fundamental principles of more advanced quantitative analysis (such as two-way ANOVA and multiple regression). In qualitative methods students will be introduced to techniques such as interviewing and focus groups, and will be introduced to key specific analysis approaches in qualitative psychology such as IPA, and grounded theory. Students report writing and research proposal skills will be developed and enhanced throughout this module. Practical topics, where possible, will make theoretical links with other modules running concurrently. Additionally, there will be a focus on understanding of experimental design and data interpretation. Full guidance and technician support will be offered to students throughout.

 

 

 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 48.00
Independent : 152.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Further develop knowledge of quantitative & qualitative research methodology & analysis
  • Develop the ability to manipulate and interpret data sets using specialist software
  • Enhance understanding of ethical issues associated with psychological research
  • Enhance research report writing skills
  • Develop the ability to write a research proposal
  • Enhance understanding of data interpretation.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:


  • Demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of quantitative and qualitative methodology & analysis
  • Understand and evaluate psychological research evidence as they are reported in scientific publications
  • Formulate and present complex ideas in the form of research questions based upon previous literature and/or empirical findings
  • Carry out appropriate data collection methods and analysis using software where appropriate
  • Show awareness of the importance of ethical issues in psychological research where appropriate
  • Demonstrate the ability to interpret data, report data findings in the conventional manner, and draw appropriate conclusions from research data
  • Evidence competence in planning and writing reports and research proposal.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

Component 2 - 50% Qualitative Research Report with Research Proposal (2000 words)

THE INDIVIDUAL IN SOCIETY


MODULE TITLE : THE INDIVIDUAL IN SOCIETY

MODULE CODE : PYU503


MODULE SUMMARY :

Students will explore the breadth and depth of topics such as Intelligence, Personality, Groups, Interpersonal Behaviours, and Social Influence. Issues of measurement and testing, including psychometric testing, reliability, validity and usage will be explored.  This module will also touch upon issues of cross-cultural validity and globalisation in research -- whether observed phenomenon (for example, attribution errors, happiness, etc.) manifest across all cultures, and in the same way.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop a critical understanding of the Individual in Society
  • Develop a knowledge and understanding of theories & psychological approaches relevant to the Individual in Society
  • Evaluate psychological explanations for social, interpersonal & intra-personal phenomena
  • Evaluate the utility of psychometric testing as applied to the real world 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Evaluate aspects of key models, theories and research of the Individual in Society
  • Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of key areas of the Individual in Society
  • Evaluate and critique the extent to which psychological findings may offer credible explanations for a range of social, intrapersonal and interpersonal behaviours
  • Critically evaluate the usefulness of psychometric testing in real world contexts

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Report (2000 words)

THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES IN PSYCHOLOGY


MODULE TITLE : THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES IN PSYCHOLOGY

MODULE CODE : PYU504


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module extends students’ knowledge through a consideration of the applied area of Counselling Psychology.  Key theories used to work with clients in Counselling Psychology settings will be explored and evaluated.  The philosophy and professional context of the discipline will be discussed and students will develop and critique a range of counselling skills appropriate to helping professions

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Build on students’ theoretical knowledge of applied Psychology through consideration of the developing field of Counselling Psychology
  • Develop a critical appreciation of the key theories which are applied in Counselling Psychology when working with clients
  • Develop a critical awareness of the unique philosophy and professional context of Counselling approaches within the applied psychologies in the UK.
  • Facilitate a developing self-awareness and capacity for reflective practice
  • Identify therapeutic approaches that can be used by psychologists and others in helping professions

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Illustrate a sound knowledge and critical awareness of the key theories, concepts, models and research within Counselling Psychology
  • Critically appreciate the role of research in counselling psychology, and apply this to the evaluation of material covered in the module and to their own helping skills
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the philosophy and professional context of counselling psychology in the UK
  • Identify and analyse the ethical, professional aspects of applying a counselling approach.
  • Demonstrate, and critique a range of skills appropriate to professionals using a counselling approach.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Critical Reflection (2000 words)

COGNITION AND THE BRAIN


COGNITION AND THE BRAIN: details currently unavailable

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT: AN ETHOLOGICAL APPROACH


HUMAN DEVELOPMENT: AN ETHOLOGICAL APPROACH: details currently unavailable

Year 3 modules


PSYCHOLOGY DISSERTATION


MODULE TITLE : PSYCHOLOGY DISSERTATION

MODULE CODE : PYU601


MODULE SUMMARY :

This tutored double module provides students with the opportunity to select an area of particular interest to them within the field of Psychology and to design, plan and execute an in-depth empirical research project in their chosen area. Students will be required to produce a brief initial research proposal, for discussion with their supervisor. The proposal is then used as a basis for developing an application for Newman University ethical approval, which must be achieved prior to commencing data collection. The research design should include either quantitative and/or qualitative analyses and draw upon and critically evaluate a range of both classic and contemporary research findings throughout. A poster presentation detailing the research process and findings will also be an assessed element.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 12.00
Independent : 388.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  400.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Further enhance the ability to identify, analyse and critically evaluate research evidence relating to a selected area of interest in the field of Psychology
  • Further enhance the ability to select appropriate, ethically sound research methods in relation to identified research purposes and justify their use, with tutor support
  • Further enhance the ability to work constructively with an advisory tutor recognising that the content and execution of the project belongs to the student
  • Further enhance ability to present and analyse qualitative and/or quantitative data clearly and in an appropriate format

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Identify, analyse and critically evaluate research evidence relating to a selected area of interest in the field of Psychology
  • Select appropriate, ethically sound research methods in relation to identified research purposes and justify their employment, with tutor support
  • Carry out a substantial piece of independently-driven research
  • Present, analyse and evaluate either qualitative and/or quantitative data clearly and in an appropriate format
  • Draw appropriate conclusions from data analysis 
  • Write up research findings using normal conventions
  • Recognise the need to consider aspects of gender, and cultural and ethical issues in their research design where appropriate
  • Communicate their research findings to an audience of tutors and peers for scrutiny.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 20% Poster Presentation (500-800 words, plus 15 minutes)

Component 2 - 80% Dissertation (10000 words)

PSYCHOLOGY IN QUESTION


PSYCHOLOGY IN QUESTION: details currently unavailable

HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY - optional module


HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY: details currently unavailable

PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AND MENTAL WELL-BEING - optional module


MODULE TITLE : PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AND MENTAL WELL-BEING

MODULE CODE : PYU605


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module covers the key concepts related to psychological distress and mental wellbeing. The module will present different models of psychological distress including biological, psychological, social approaches as well as integrative bio-psychosocial models. The pervasiveness of medical views will also be discussed with typical use of terms such as mental illness, disorders, abnormality and clinical psychology as well as concepts of categorical (caseness) and dimensional views of psychological distress/illness. The module will include an historical account of mental distress and then focus on key psychological disorders and discuss their aetiology, diagnosis and treatment. Students will be encouraged to consider their own opinions and those of others as it relates to these topics. Learning occurs via two main components: a lecture series; and a series of seminars. The seminar series will especially provide a space for students to discuss and debate the key issues in psychological distress/illness. Assessment of the module will be via two components: submission of an analysis of a case study; and an end of module exam.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Build on students theoretical knowledge of Psychology through a consideration of the  rapidly developing field of clinical or mental-health psychology
  • Develop a critical awareness of where the discipline of clinical psychology stands in a historical, academic and professional context
  • Consolidate students awareness of  the biopsychosocial approach to mental wellbeing and psychological distress
  • Evaluate and examine the theoretical models which attempt to describe and explain mental distress Provide students with a thorough grounding in the major type of mental disorders
  • Raise students’ awareness and understanding of the psychosocial impact of mental distress
  • Facilitate engagement in key debates in clinical psychological using a range of approaches and evidence
  • Facilitate the development of critical appraisal skills in evaluating clinical psychology research

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Illustrate a sound knowledge and critical awareness of the core concepts, theories, models, and research within clinical psychology, and apply this to current topics.
  • Display a critical and self-reflective awareness of the ethical, sociocultural, and political issues evident in the clinical psychology literature.
  • Demonstrate an in depth knowledge and understanding of the importance and limitations of clinical psychology research to understanding mental health and psychological distress.
  • Demonstrate the ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing, and sustained argument, using a range of primary sources in clinical psychology, and use it to formulate arguments on specific topics of metal health and psychological distress.
  • Demonstrate a systematic understanding of clinical psychology theory, methods, and research.
  • Critically evaluate research findings in the field of clinical psychology.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Written Analysis (1500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

NEUROPSYCHOLOGY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : NEUROPSYCHOLOGY

MODULE CODE : PYU607


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module builds upon the second year courses in cognitive and biopsychology, illustrating how these two important strands of psychology come together to help us understand patients with various types of neurological disorder. The major cognitive functions of attention, memory and language will be considered in turn, and then two major conditions, head injury and dementia will be considered as examples. 

N.B. This module cannot be taken with the module COU604 Neuroscience in Counselling, since this is an excluded combination.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Build on students theoretical knowledge of Psychology through a consideration of the  rapidly developing field of health psychology
  • Develop a critical awareness of where the discipline of health psychology stands in a historical, academic and professional context
  • Consolidate students awareness of  the biopsychosocial approach to health and illness
  • Evaluate and examine the theoretical models which attempt to predict and explain health behaviours and examine the practical application of these models in health promotion campaigns
  • Provide students with a thorough grounding in the relationship between stress, illness and health, individual differences in health and illness, and the ways in which the impact of stress on health and illness is mediated
  • Raise students’ awareness and understanding of the psychosocial impact of disability and chronic illness
  • Examine the psychosocial aspects of the hospital environment and its effect on patient health and well being
  • Critically examine the impact of illness cognition on understating health behaviour
  • Facilitate the development of critical appraisal skills in evaluating health psychology research.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Demonstrate an informed understanding of how psychological theories can help increase understanding of neurological conditions
  • Critically analyze neuropsychological research
  • Evaluate debates surrounding alternative theoretical accounts of neuropsychological conditions, and differing views about the implications of these for rehabilitation
  • Illustrate their critical awareness of gender, cultural and ethical issues in the area where appropriate
  • Critically discuss the extent to which theoretical knowledge increases understanding of patients 
  • Suggest how theoretical knowledge can guide rehabilitation and intervention
  • Show the ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence
  • Evaluate primary source material critically.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Critical Appraisal (2000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Written Examination (2 hours)

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

MODULE CODE : PYU608


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module builds upon the second year module Human Development: An Ethological Approach (PYU506) and applies an understanding of contextualised development in an educational setting. Educational Psychology explores various and seemingly discrete issues associated with the dynamic between teaching and learning. These issues include the qualities of a good teacher, the environment of the classroom, the form and function of assessment, diversity and the use of blended approaches to teaching and learning.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Advance understanding of research methodologies and psychological theories which inform educational practice
  • Enhance knowledge of the ways in which student diversity can impact upon teaching and learning
  • Further develop the ability to evaluate current research evidence offered in explanation of approaches to teaching and learning
  • Advance the ability to appraise different methods of assessment

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Critically evaluate ways in which psychological research and theories have been applied to educational practice
  • Assess the implications of psychological research for improving the effectiveness of teaching and learning
  • Appraise the impact of culture, exceptionalities in learning, and community on learning
  • compare and evaluate different types of student assessment and how good quality assessments must be valid measurements of ability
  • Write an informed critique on a piece of psychological research
  • Show the ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence
  • Evaluate primary source material critically

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% WRITTEN CRITIQUE, 2000 WORDS

Component 2 - 50% WRITTEN EXAMINATION, 2 HOURS

FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY - optional module


Forensic Psychology


Module Code: PYU606
Module Summary:
This module explores applications of psychology to the Criminal Justice System. The work of forensic psychologists and the contexts within which they perform their duties will be evaluated. The major issues covered will be the use of forensic psychology in the investigative process, the court system, and the punishment and rehabilitation of offending populations. The work of forensic psychologists with victims and witnesses will also be covered. The links between theory and practice in these areas will be discussed. The future directions and contributions of forensic psychology will be considered.


CATS Value: 20
ECTS Value: 10
Contact Hours:
Scheduled: 36 Independent: 164 Placement: 0 Total Hours: 200


Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to:
• Build on students theoretical knowledge and ability to apply it in practical contexts through a consideration of the discipline of forensic psychology
• Evaluate and examine current developments in the discipline and to consider the influences and impact of these in the Criminal Justice System (CJS)
• Develop an understanding of how psychological theories can be used throughout the CJS including working with victim and witness agencies, aiding police officers in investigations, within the courtroom and with the assessment and treatment of offenders
• Develop an appreciation of the professional role of forensic psychologists within the CJS



Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:
• Demonstrate a critical and informed understanding of psychology’s contribution to the Criminal Justice System
• Critically analyse, evaluate and synthesise into new forms, forensic psychological research
• Apply psychological theory to forensic psychology practice, including novel synthesis of diverse sources
• Illustrate a critical awareness of ethical issues in the area where appropriate
• Show the ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence
• Evaluate primary source material critically



Assessment:
Component 1: 50%
Produce a professional, academic information pamphlet about a specific application of forensic psychology for the relevant professional group (2000 words)
Component 2: 50%
Write an expert report based on a case study, which is provided (2000 words)

WORK PSYCHOLOGY - optional module


MODULE TITLE : WORK PSYCHOLOGY

MODULE CODE : PYU609


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module explores the psychological factors operating within organisations and the workplace, and will examine current developments in the field. This module will outline the historical development of this discipline. This module will consider topics relating to human resource functions (including, personnel selection and assessment, and motivation) and it will explore workplace ergonomics, which will include workspace design, environmental conditions, and job design. Additionally, it will explore decision making and leadership.   Students will be offered practical experience of some of the techniques used in the field of work psychology, and there will be the opportunity to engage in small-scale research project in the workplace. It is anticipated that this module will offer students an opportunity to enhance their understanding of organisations thus aiding their preparation for the world of work.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Extend students theoretical knowledge of psychology through a consideration of the field of work psychology.
  • Extend students’ awareness of the role of psychology in applied settings
  • Examine and evaluate the importance of individual differences in determining the effectiveness of workplace settings
  • Develop a critical awareness of work psychology in historical and applied contexts.
  • Critically evaluate the use of personnel selection methods
  • Examine the psychological aspects of the physical and organizational work environment
  • Contribute to the development of critical appraisal skills in evaluating work psychology literature
  • Illustrate how different approaches can be used to explain the same behaviour
  • Explore key issues and debates within psychology

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Demonstrate a sound knowledge and critical awareness of concepts, theories, models, and relevant research evidence within work psychology, and to apply these to work related contemporary issues.
  • Illustrate a critical awareness of the interaction between the physical aspects work setting, individual psychological factors, and behaviour 
  • Evaluate and apply different methodological research designs in solving workplace problems
  •   Empirically evaluate the suitability of a workplace setting based on people’s self-reports and environmental factors 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Report (1500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE METHODS - optional module


Advanced Quantitative Methods


Module Code: PYU610
Module Summary:
This module will introduce students to advanced quantitative research methods and techniques and explore the philosophical underpinnings (epistemology and ontology) relevant to quantitative research design.
In particular, students will develop their understanding of various types of regression. Moreover, data analytical techniques such as factor and cluster analyses will be introduced. Students will be introduced to the basic principles behind meta-analysis. Moreover, students will develop their understanding of mixed method design and triangulation of data.
CATS Value: 20
ECTS Value: 10
Contact Hours:
Scheduled: 70 Independent: 130 Placement: 0 Total Hours: 200
Module Leader: Lorna Dodd / Stella Williams /Anatoli Karypidou

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to:
• Develop students understanding of advanced quantitative methodologies (e.g. types of regression)
• Introduce students to quantitative data analytical techniques (e.g. factor and cluster analysis, transforming data.)
• Introduction to meta-analysis.
• Develop students’ awareness of mixed method design and triangulation.
• Further develop students’ ethical awareness and research report writing skills.


Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:
• Illustrate an awareness of limitations within research design
• Illustrate valid interpretations from a range of methodological outcomes
• Critically apply a range of methodologies in research designs
• Demonstrate an ability to generate and explore hypotheses
• Critically, analyse, present and evaluate quantitative and qualitative research findings
• Demonstrate the use of evidence-based reasoning to examine theoretical and ethical issues within quantitative and qualitative methodologies.

Assessment:
Component 1: 100% A quantitative research report for publication (3,500 words).


ADVANCED QUALITATIVE METHODS - optional module


Advanced Qualitative Methods


Module Code: PYU611
Module Summary:
This module will introduce students to advanced qualitative research methods and techniques and explore the philosophical underpinnings (epistemology and ontology) relevant to qualitative research design.
In particular, students will develop their understanding of various types of analysis such as Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis and Discourse Analysis. Students will also be introduced to the basic principles behind conceptual reviews. Moreover, students will develop their understanding of mixed method design and triangulation of data.
CATS Value: 20
ECTS Value: 10
Contact Hours:
Scheduled: 70 Independent: 130 Placement: 0 Total Hours: 200

Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
This module aims to:
• Develop students understanding of advanced qualitative analytical strategies (e.g. IPA, DA)
• Introduction to systematic reviews.
• Develop students’ awareness of mixed method design and data triangulation.
• Further develop students’ ethical awareness and research report writing skills.


Learning Opportunities:
Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:
• Illustrate an awareness of limitations within research design
• Illustrate valid interpretations from a range of methodological outcomes
• Critically apply a range of methodologies in research designs
• Demonstrate an ability to generate and explore research questions
• Critically, analyse, present and evaluate quantitative and qualitative research findings
• Demonstrate the use of evidence-based reasoning to examine theoretical and ethical issues within quantitative and qualitative methodologies.

Assessment:
Component 1: 100% A qualitative research report for publication (3,500 words).

Course code


C800

Applications for full-time courses are made through UCAS.

Applications for part-time courses are made via Newman.

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C800

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