Counselling Studies and Working with Children, Young People and Families BA (Hons)

Honours Degree , Full-time

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Key Details

  • 3 Years
  • 96 Typical UCAS Tariff
  • BL95 Course Code
  • Full Time
counselling session

Overview

Why study this course?

Counselling Studies and Working with Children, Young People and Families is a popular course combination involving the study of two different disciplines to give you the knowledge and understanding needed for a range of career opportunities.

High quality counselling skills are useful within many professional contexts where listening and understanding are important, such as teaching, nursing and social work. These skills will complement the knowledge that you will also gain throughout your studies, to help you understand the social, economic, educational, political and cultural issues and barriers facing children, young people and families, particularly in socially disadvantaged areas.

What does the course cover?

A key area of application for counselling skills and a counselling approach is working with children, young people and families. Professionals working with these groups are increasingly required to gain formal qualifications recognising their expertise in these areas. You will focus on social and education policy and the importance of multi-agency working to provide support for children and families. You will also explore how society views childhood, how children develop, the challenges facing children and young people today and the impact of relevant legislation. A major theme throughout the course will be listening to children and young people, making services responsive and developing strategies to enhance the participation of children and young people.

To complement these themes you will also be introduced to, and critically evaluate contemporary counselling theories, putting the principles into practice yourself, through the development of competent and ethical counselling skills. Underpinning this will be an appreciation of different views and the capacity to value diversity in the context of a counselling approach.

How will I be assessed?

The course offers a variety of assessment methods to suit the experience of the module studied, and will include essays, exams, presentations and case studies. Counselling skills modules may require critical reflection and the production of a reflective personal journal along with various project work.

What careers can I consider?

As a graduate you will be furnished with valuable transferable skills and an understanding of multiagency working. Many go on to a wide range of careers within education, youth work and health and social care or undertake further training for a career in which counselling skills may be useful – for example, teaching, social work, nursing or Psychotherapy/Counselling. The issues covered in this course would benefit those considering postgraduate training in social work or professional training in counselling.

Entry Requirements

September 2019 Entry Requirements

You must achieve at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma; MPP at BTEC Extended Diploma) towards the total tariff.

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9-M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

Five GCSEs at grade 4 (or C) or above (or recognised equivalents), including English Language, are also required.

Contact details

Contact: Contact for admissions enquiries
Admissions
Tel: 0121 476 1181 (Ext. 2386)
Email: admissions@newman.ac.uk

Kevin Hogan (Senior Lecturer / Programme lead for Combined Honours Counselling Studies)
Tel: 0121 476 1181 (Ext. 3571)
Email: K.F.Hogan@newman.ac.uk

Directions

Course Fees

Fees per academic year:
Full-time Home/EU students: £9,250 *
* Fees shown are for 2019/20 academic year. The University will review tuition fees and increase fees in line with any inflationary uplift as determined by the UK Government, if permitted by law or government policy, in subsequent years of your course. It is anticipated that such increases would be linked to RPI (the Retail Price Index excluding mortgage interest payments).

Additional costs

A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is not required for entry into this programme, although it is in many cases required by employers before students can begin their Year 2 (level 5) work placement.  Find out more about completing the DBS application form and the related additional costs.

 

Additional Information

General Academic Regulations: Terms and Conditions for students attending our courses

 

  1. COUNSELLING STUDIES AND ACADEMIC PRACTICE
    (Compulsory) cou401
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will introduce students to a counselling approach, and the range of settings in which this can take place. Students will develop and reflect on basic helping skills, and consider a range of key theories taking into account issues of difference. Basic academic skills will be developed appropriate to study at level 4.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 46.00 Independent : 154.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Introduce students to counselling and a counselling approach
    • Introduce students to research and  the role of evidence-based practice in counselling
    • Identify therapeutic approaches that can be used by counsellors and others in helping professions
    • Identify, practice and reflect on basic counselling skills
    • Understand and apply sound basic academic practice.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Identify and analyse the ethical, professional aspects of applying a counselling approach and the range of settings in which this can take place
    • Describe in detail the main theoretical approaches used in counselling in the UK
    • Employ evidence-based reasoning to examine the efficacy of counselling including common factors
    • Identify issues that might arise when working with a minority group e.g. gender, disability, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, class etc.
    • Demonstrate and critique a range of skills appropriate to professionals using a counselling approach.
    • demonstrate a degree of self-awareness and reflect on the factors involved in       interpersonal communication
    • Evidence the ability to use written communication clearly, coherently and grammatically, within a given structure, using the standard referencing techniques of the discipline, demonstrating effective choice and organisation of material, including electronic sources.

    .

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% e-Portfolio (1500 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Portfolio of Evidence (1500 words)

  2. HUMANISTIC COUNSELLING THEORY AND SKILLS
    (Compulsory) cou404
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will introduce students to the three main theories of counselling used in the UK, but with a particular focus on the Humanistic Approach. Alongside which, students will develop their ethical and professional awareness.  There will be opportunities to begin to develop the process of self-reflection.  Students will have the opportunity to practice using Humanistic Skills in a counselling skills scenario, and will be required to record a short session demonstrating the use of these skills. 

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 37.00 Independent : 163.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Enable students to develop knowledge and understanding of the main theoretical approaches to counselling used in the UK, with a particular focus on the Humanistic approach
    • Enable students to be able to begin to demonstrate and critique their use of Humanistic skills in a counselling scenario
    • Enable students to develop an appreciation of the nature of counselling
    • Develop student’s awareness of ethical issues in counselling
    • Facilitate students in the process of developing self awareness
    • Enable students to reflect through experience on the nature of interpersonal communication and perception

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Articulate in detail the Humanistic approach and situate it in relation to the main theoretical approaches used in counselling in the UK
    • Demonstrate awareness of client issues and critique the application of the Humanistic approach to particular presenting concerns
    • Compare and contrast the Humanistic approach with other theoretical approaches
    • Demonstrate awareness of the importance of culture and difference in counselling, and in particular how this relates to the Humanistic approach
    • Demonstrate the ability to incorporate Humanistic ideas into counselling skills practice
    • Evidence the ability to use written communication clearly, coherently and grammatically, within a given structure, using the standard referencing techniques of the discipline, to demonstrate effective choice and organisation of material
    • Use information technology to access, retrieve and store information, and present information as appropriate

     

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Transcript and Commentary (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Essay (1000 words)

  3. AN INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS IN COUNSELLING
    (Compulsory) cou405
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module explores the central role ethics plays in any counselling approach and the importance of integrity, trustworthiness and client autonomy. Students will engage in ethical problem solving and the importance of accountability.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Develop an understanding of ethics and ethical practice in counselling and counselling skills
    • Develop skills in ethical discourse.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    • Gain an understanding of ethics and ethical principles.

    • Engage in ethical discourse in relation to counselling and using counselling skills.

    • Recall a professional code of ethical practice for counsellors (e.g. British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (2016) Ethical Framework for the Counselling Professions).

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Case Study (1000 word equivalent)

    Component 2 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

  4. INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING
    (Compulsory) plu404
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module aims to equip students with the knowledge and self-management skills to make informed choices in preparing for work placement and the transition to employment or further study on graduation.  

    Learners will be provided with the opportunities to develop awareness of the workplace, identify different career and study options, recognise and articulate their own experience, accomplishments and talents and plan and implement career management strategies for the short and long term.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 12.00 Independent   : 88.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Support students in developing informed choices about the career pathways available to them, in relation to their subject choices.
    • Prepare students for work-based learning and the application / exploration of subject knowledge in the workplace.

    • Encourage students to make connections between their learning, placement choice, future job aspirations and contribution to society.

    • Enable students to build confidence in securing work placements and future employment.

    • Support students in reflecting upon their preparation for their work placement and future employment.  

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

    1. Examine how their experiences, accomplishments, and abilities relate to employer expectations.

    2. Demonstrate engagement with, and an understanding of, graduate employment pathways and employability issues relating to their own career aspirations.

    3. Research organisations for the purposes of securing a work placement.

    4. Reflect upon their learning and development.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Reflective Essay and Appendix, 2000 words

  5. THE INCLUSIVE PRACTITIONER
    (Compulsory) wwu401
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will encourage students to think about the centrality of inclusive practice and how this is influenced by practitioners’ own value base. It will look at how and why children, young people and families can become socially excluded and will look at the implications for inclusive practitioners.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 48.00 Independent   : 152.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Explore the complexity of personal and professional values
    • Explore principles underpinning Human Rights and Social Justice
    • Provide an introduction to the range of factors which can lead to people being socially excluded
    • Provide an introduction to the historical and current social inclusion debate

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Understand the complexity of personal and professional values in influencing how we approach practice  
    • Be aware of the value base which supports inclusive practice
    • Begin to evaluate research in relation to practice
    • Work collaboratively with colleagues in identifying and planning inclusive strategies for children, young people and families

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Group Seminar Discussion (20 minutes)

    Component 2 - 50% Individual Reflective Account (1500 words)

  6. AN INTRODUCTION TO WORKING WITH CHILDREN, YOUNG PEOPLE AND FAMILIES
    (Compulsory) wwu410
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module aims to give students an introduction to the historical development of services for children, young people and families in the UK and focuses on key events that have shaped those services. The module will look at how notions of ‘vulnerability’ have influenced the way those services are structured and will explore the social and legislative response made by governments and non-statutory organisations to demands for improvements in the way children and families are supported.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Provide students with some historical background to the development of services for children and families.

    • Give them a chance to explore what is meant by the notion of ‘vulnerability’;

    • Give a critical appreciation of legislation in this field;

    • Provide an opportunity to examine the effectiveness of different organisations working in the field.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Engage with the development of key ideas in their chosen area of study;

    • Look at the social history of core services to children and families;       

    • Begin to analyse the quality, design and delivery of services to CYPF;

    • Be steered towards key thinkers and writers in this field.

    • Study how effective legislation has been in the goal of improving services to children and families.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% ESSAY, 2000 WORDS

  7. SOCIOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD AND FAMILIES
    (Compulsory) wwu411
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Our experiences of childhood form the indispensable backdrop to almost every aspect of our lives, and for most people these are framed by the kind of family life we have, or want to have. This module will introduce students to the key sociological ideas about childhood and families and explore how these theories can be used to understand the contemporary experience of family life in the UK and elsewhere. It will draw on concrete examples from history and from cutting edge research to explore the nature of the tasks facing practitioners in the field today and to assess the tools which are available to them.  

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 76.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Introduce students to the key sociological theories about childhood and family life

    • Show how sociological theory can illuminate controversial or complex aspects of childhood and family life in the contemporary climate.

    • Use sociological theory to compare the current British experience with understandings of childhoods in other times and places.

    • Reflect on the ways in which practitioners might benefit from applying sociological theories of the family in real-world contexts.

    • Familiarise students with the ways in which different ideas about childhood and family affect social life and professional practice.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Explore the ways in which sociological theories of childhood and families can illuminate their own life experiences and those of the people around them.           

    • To study in detail how specific sociological theories were developed and how they relate to one-another

    • To demonstrate a critical awareness of the range of theoretical explanations for different features of childhood and family life.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% ESSAY 2000 WORDS

  1. RESEARCH IN COUNSELLING
    (Optional) cou501
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module aims to enable students who already have a foundation in counselling theory and skills to fully appreciate the role and application of research in this area.  In the course of the module students will be introduced to a variety of methods and approaches, which will be examined with a highly practical focus.  Emphasis will be placed on the kinds of issues and research questions which are commonly addressed in counselling, and which might be addressed using different research approaches. Students will demonstrate their acquisition of the knowledge by carrying out a small research project and writing a research proposal suitable for a final year dissertation.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 50.00 Independent : 150.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Explore the notion of research, and the different types of research that are commonly used in counselling, including quantitative and qualitative approaches 
    • Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of research and evaluation tools including interviews, observation, questionnaires, and case studies.
    • Enable students to design effective research tools that are fit for purpose and meet ethical requirements, and implement these.
    • Enable students to be able to carry out some data collection and analysis, with guidance, and to gain an understanding of how research reports are constructed.
    • Assist students in developing skills and understanding necessary for them to embark on a dissertation in the counselling subject area at level 6.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:       

    • Offer definitions for and discuss a range of research terminology and understand the processes involved in carrying out a research project
    • Understand what research ethics are and how to ensure that ethical considerations are in place when conducting research
    • Be able to identify an appropriate research methodology and explain when and how to use the different research tools, identifying appropriateness to the methodology
    • Discuss the issues involved in planning and undertaking a research project.
    • Evaluate the possible success and failures of their chosen methodology.
    • Be able to undertake a small-scale research project utilising both qualitative and quantitative methods.
    • Be able to develop a proposal for a research project suitable for a final-year dissertation project.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Report of Counselling Related Research Project (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Research Proposal (1500 words)

  2. PHILOSOPHICAL AND CONCEPTUAL ISSUES IN COUNSELLING
    (Compulsory) cou503
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will explore the philosophical bases underpinning current theoretical counselling models. Students should be able to name important figures and discuss their contribution to philosophy and counselling. They should also be able to outline key philosophical concepts and relate these to socio-cultural and historical contexts, then demonstrate an understanding of how this influences developments in counselling and psychotherapy. They will be encouraged to critically consider the Eurocentric focus of much counselling in Europe and the United States, and consider alternative perspectives.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 37.00 Independent : 163.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Give students knowledge of the philosophical underpinnings of counselling.

    • Give students a knowledge and understanding of key figures in philosophical thinking and relate these to the development of ideas in counselling and psychology

    • Enable students to relate current theories and practices in counselling to their philosophical underpinnings

    • Enable students to understand how particular socio-cultural contexts, that are underpinned by different philosophies, relate to counselling and psychology practice

       

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Study key philosophical influences in the development of counselling, including examples from the classical, renaissance, reformation and enlightenment periods.

    • Critically evaluate philosophical strands of the 19th & 20th centuries and their influences on key figures in counselling and psychology.

    • Apply the philosophical development of counselling and psychology to current models of practice.

    • Reflect upon the development of counselling and psychology in the context of differing socio-economic systems that are underpinned by different philosophies.

    • Evidence the ability to use written communication clearly, coherently and grammatically, within a given structure, using the standard referencing techniques of the discipline, demonstrating effective choice and organisation of material.

    • Use IT, in particular word processing software, to produce documentation to a professional standard. Use IT in order to produce an information leaflet to a professional standard.

    • Work as a team member within a small group.

    • Take part in discussions both within a small group and within a larger class

       

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% 2 HOUR EXAMINATION

  3. CBT COUNSELLING THEORY AND SKILLS
    (Compulsory) cou504
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module gives students knowledge of the most recent developments within the Cognitive Behavioural Approach.  Students will gain an understanding of the historical influences of this approach and the theoretical assumptions.  There will be a focus on how to apply cognitive behavioural approaches to practice, and an opportunity to critically reflect upon cognitive behavioural concepts in light of other counselling theories.  There will be opportunities for students to continue to develop their ethical and professional awareness, and opportunities to continue the process of self-reflection. 

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 37.00 Independent : 163.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Enable students to further increase their knowledge of theory within the Cognitive Behavioural approach

    • Further develop students’ awareness of ethical issues in counselling

    • Enable students’ to enhance their understanding of how to apply cognitive behavioural approaches within therapeutic practice

    • Enable students to critically evaluate current cognitive behavioural concepts in the light of other theories

    • Use a range of resources, CBT tools and the Code of Ethics to identify and overcome problems and difficulties

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Detail recent developments within cognitive behavioural counselling

    • Critically compare recent cognitive behavioural concepts to concepts in other traditions

    • Critically reflect on future avenues for development of the cognitive behavioural approach

    • Consider how recent developments might impact upon their own working

    • Critically consider how recent developments can be integrated within their own personal philosophy and style of working

    • Evidence the ability to use written communication clearly, coherently and grammatically, within a given structure, using the standard referencing techniques of the discipline, demonstrating effective choice and organisation of material.

    • Make critical judgements and evaluations, identifying general principles and evaluating competing perspectives 

    • Work autonomously, setting personal goals and deadlines as appropriate in order to complete set tasks

    • Extend subject knowledge through independent appraisal of a range of learning resources

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Critical Evaluation (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Case Study (2000 words)

  4. WORK PLACEMENT
    (Compulsory) plu502
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 10.00 Independent   : 90.00 Placement   : 100.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement in a workplace setting.

    • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement and of their independent learning throughout the experience.

    • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.

    • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.

    • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to: 

    1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.

    2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.

    3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.

    4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

     

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - PLACEMENT REGISTRATION FORM

    Component 2 - 60% WORK PLACEMENT REFLECTION (2500 WORDS)

    Component 3 - 40% WORK PLACEMENT EVALUATION: DIGITAL RESOURCE (1500 WORDS EQUIVALENT)

  5. UNDERSTANDING DISCRIMINATION
    (Compulsory) wwu503
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Discrimination exists in many forms in British society, having a negative impact on the lives of children, young people and families. It is therefore essential that practitioners understand discrimination. This module will explore the historical context for discrimination in the UK, who has the power to discriminate and how discrimination is experienced. The module will also critically evaluate theories of discrimination, including Critical Race Theory, Feminisms and the Personal, Cultural and Structural model of understanding discrimination. The module will focus on exploring discrimination of different groups in society and the intersection and overlap of inequalities. A central focus of the module will be on the policy response to discrimination in the UK, the roles and responsibilities of institutions in relation to discrimination, and examining the extent to which the issues have been addressed.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Explore the concept of discrimination
    • Discuss the power relation in society in relation to discrimination.
    • Critically evaluate the theories of discrimination.
    • Apply theories of discrimination to their impact on children, young people and families.
    • Critically evaluate the UK policy response to discrimination.
    • Examine institutional responses and responsibilities to discrimination.
    • Act as a link between Level 4 and Level 6 modules on identity and inequality.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Engage in a discussion of the concept of discrimination.           
    • Explore the historical context for discrimination in the UK.
    • Explain why discrimination is a persistent feature of society.
    • Apply theory to critical analyse discrimination in society.
    • Critically examine the role of institutions in relation to discrimination.
    • Evaluate the impact of discrimination on children, young people and families.
    • Apply their theoretical understandings to their work based learning environment.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Essay (4000 words)

  6. UNDERSTANDING DISABILITY
    (Compulsory) wwu508
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will enable students to develop an understanding and analysis of disability that builds on the issues they engage with in the Level 4 module entitled ‘The Inclusive Practitioner’. The content of the module will be based on a human rights model and will encourage students to see issues relating to both physical and learning disabilities in their social, political and ideological context. The module will enable the students to understand that issues of disability are best understood through an anti-discriminatory, values-led approach and not via a diagnostic or medical perspective.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Provide students with an understanding of how social attitudes towards disability are socially constructed
    • Enable students to understand the importance of the historical development of ideas relating to disability
    • Engage with contentious ideas about current ideas of disability have developed historically and how these may develop in the future
    • Analyse the impact of this debate on current practitioners.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Develop a better understanding of the way in which our understanding of physical and learning disabilities have developed
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the key theories, ideas and legislation that have shaped the debate
    • Apply this understanding to current practice
    • Look in more detail at how anti-discriminatory and inclusive practice can be developed.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Group Presentation (15 minutes plus questions)

    Component 2 - 50% Reflective Piece (up to 2000 words)

  7. GETTING TO GRIPS WITH RESEARCH
    (Optional) wwu500
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This research module aims to develop students’ research literacy, knowledge and understanding of research theory with a view to helping them understand where, why and how research was developed and its relationship to practice. It will also explore the choices of methodologies used for different research projects and consider the constraints and influences that have led to the research being undertaken in the way it was.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 76.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Demystify the term research and build student confidence in approaching research

    • Explore the notion of research, and the different types of research (e.g. social research, psychological research, Government Research)

    • Develop students' research literacy with a view to helping them understand where, why and how the research was developed and its relationship to practice

    Explore research methodology theory including quantitative, qualitative and action research

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Evaluate different approaches to researching the same topic

    • Offer definitions for and discuss a range of research terminology and understand the processes involved in carrying out a research project

    • Understand what research ethics are and how to ensure that ethical considerations are in place when conducting research

    • Be able to identify what makes an appropriate research methodology and critique a project’s purpose, methods and potential impact

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Written Critique 2500 words

  8. GETTING READY FOR YOUR CAPSTONE RESEARCH PROJECT
    (Optional) wwu520
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will build on the knowledge and understanding of research theory that was developed in Module WWU500.  It will focus on strengthening the knowledge, understanding and skills needed for students to proceed with their Capstone Research Project at level 6.  The module will help students to explore the Capstone Research Project options so that they can make informed decisions/choices.  The module will identify what the options are and will introduce a range of appropriate research and/or communication tools for each option.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 76.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Explore the options available for undertaking a Capstone Research Project at Level 6.

    • Explore the range of research approaches available for each of the Capstone Research Projects.

    • Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of a range of research and communication tools, as appropriate for each Capstone Research Project option.

    • Enable students to design effective research tools for their preferred option that are fit for purpose and meet ethical requirements.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Identify the options available for Capstone Research Projects. 

    • Evaluate the options available for Capstone Research Projects.

    • Evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages of a range of research approaches and tools in the context of their preferred Capstone Research Project.

    • Understand what research ethics are and how to ensure that ethical considerations are in place when conducting research

    • Discuss the issues involved in planning and undertaking a research project.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Rationale for a research project, 2500 words

  1. COUNSELLING STUDIES DISSERTATION
    (Optional) cou601
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This tutored double module provides students with the opportunity to select an area of particular interest to them within the field of Counselling and to design, plan and execute an in-depth empirical research project in their chosen area. Students will be required to produce a brief initial research proposal, for discussion with their supervisor. The proposal is then used as a basis for developing an application for Newman University ethical approval, which must be achieved prior to commencing data collection. The research design should include either quantitative and/or qualitative analyses and draw upon and critically evaluate a range of both classic and contemporary research findings throughout.  A poster presentation detailing the research process and findings will also be assessed.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 12.00 Independent : 388.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  400.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Further enhance the ability to identify, analyse and critically evaluate research evidence relating to a selected area of interest in the field of Counselling
    • Further enhance the ability to select appropriate, ethically sound research methods in relation to identified research purposes and justify their use, with tutor support
    • Further enhance the ability to work constructively with an advisory tutor recognising that the content and execution of the project belongs to the student
    • Further enhance ability to present and analyse qualitative and/or quantitative data clearly and in an appropriate format.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Identify, analyse and critically evaluate research evidence relating to a selected area of interest in the field of Counselling
    • Select appropriate, ethically sound research methods in relation to identified research purposes and justify their employment, with tutor support
    • Carry out a substantial piece of independently-driven research
    • Present, analyse and evaluate either qualitative and/or quantitative data clearly and in an appropriate format
    • Draw appropriate conclusions from data analysis 
    • Write up research findings using normal conventions
    • Recognise the need to consider aspects of gender, and cultural and ethical issues in their research design where appropriate
    • Communicate their research findings to an audience of tutors and peers for scrutiny.      

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 20% Poster Presentation

    Component 2 - 80% Dissertation (10000 words)

  2. COUNSELLING CHILDREN AND FAMILIES
    (Optional) cou603
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module examines child and adolescent development in the context of family, society and culture, and explores a range of issues that arise in relation to therapeutic work.  The principles of multi-agency work will be explored. Students will study factors that contribute to resilience and vulnerability with reference to a basic knowledge of neurological development.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 37.00 Independent   : 163.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Explore models of child and adolescent development, recognizing specific needs and potential vulnerability that relate to levels of development, with reference to basic neurobiology.
    • Explore models of attachment in the context of the child and family, caring networks and outside world, examining how abuse disrupts attachment process.
    • Examine the basic concepts of family systems theory and how this applies to counselling.
    • Consider particular ethic principles that apply to working with children and adolescents, this includes multi-disciplinary and inter-agency working, and explore how this applies to working as an integrative counsellor.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of key theories of child and adolescent development, with reference to basic neurobiology, recognizing specific needs and potential vulnerability that relate to specific growth stages.
    • Critically evaluate the attachment process in the context of the child and family, care giving systems and outside world. Recognize disruptions to attachment where abuse occurs.
    • Demonstrate a critical appreciation of how a family system works and the basic principles of helping families in need.
    • Synthesise an in-depth understanding of adolescent development, appraising the role of sexuality and gender [including inter-sex] during puberty.
    • Critically reflect on how culture impacts on family structure and how socio-cultural influence child and adolescent development.
    • Apply knowledge of child and adolescent development to practice and critically reflect on specific ethical principles that underpin work with children and young people
    • Evaluate the strengths and limitations of an integrative approach in work with children, young people and families.
    • Communicate ideas and knowledge clearly, fluently and coherently both orally and in writing.
    • Work effectively as part of a group.
    • Apply knowledge and awareness of interpersonal process in working with others.
    • Apply knowledge and awareness of difference in working with others.
    • Plan and execute tasks within a given time frame.
    • Work autonomously, appropriately drawing on a range of resources including appraising current literature.
    • Be able to use IT skills effectively, including word processing databases, search techniques, data and resource retrieval. 

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% CASE STUDY, 2500 WORDS

    Component 2 - 50% CRITICAL ESSAY, 2500 WORDS

  3. NEUROSCIENCE FOR COUNSELLORS
    (Optional) cou604
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    Module Summary:
    The module will develop knowledge and understanding of, and critically examine the relevance of human evolutionary and developmental biology and neurophysiology in the context of integrative counselling theory and practice. Developments in neuroscience with relevance to the development and maintenance of common presenting problems will be critically evaluated in relation to integrative counselling and to common presenting problems in order to consider the extent to which neuroscience can contribute to models of person and or provide a basis for integration.

    N.B. This module cannot be taken with PYU607 Neuropsychology since this is an excluded combination.

    CATS Value: 20

    ECTS Value: 10

    Contact Hours:

    Scheduled: 37 (Lectures & Seminars: 36; Drop-in tutorial time: 1)
    Independent: 163
    Placement: 0
    Total Hours: 200

    Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
    This module aims to:

    • Develop understanding of contemporary human biology and particularly evolutionary, developmental and neural science of relevance to counselling, building upon the students’ previous counselling experience
    • Develop the student’s critical understanding of key aspects of the neurobiology of mind, with particular reference to: affect; cognition; behaviour; implicit, explicit and traumatic memory; attachment theory; inter-subjectivity and executive functions
    • Facilitate the student’s development of a reflective critique of human developmental and evolutionary biology, the nature-nurture debate, neurobiology, and philosophy of mind with reference to counselling theory and practice.

    Learning Opportunities:
    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Critically evaluate the relevance of current knowledge of human evolutionary, developmental and neural biology to integrative counselling practice
    • Reflectively appraise the significance of the embodied mind for integrative approaches to counselling theory and practice
    • Synthesise and apply understanding of human evolutionary neural development to the theory and practice of integrative counselling with particular reference to common presenting problems.

    Assessment:

    Component 1: 50% A critical review of specified aspects of neuroscience or relevance to counselling practice, demonstrating substantial knowledge, understanding and critical evaluation. (2000 words)

    Component 2: 50% Case studies: The application of theory to practice in the analysis of one or more case vignettes demonstrating the relevance of neuroscience to clinical practice (2500 words)
  4. PSYCHODYNAMIC COUNSELLING THEORY AND SKILLS
    (Optional) cou605
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module extends students’ knowledge and understanding beyond humanistic and CBT approaches to include the third major therapeutic tradition, the psychodynamic approach. Following a grounding in the historical influences of this approach on the development of counselling, students will gain an understanding of core psychodynamic theory and the associated skills, with emphasis on those that are most applicable to counselling practice.  There will be a focus on understanding counselling process from the psychodynamic perspective and an opportunity to critically reflect on the use of psychodynamic concepts within the counselling context.  There will be opportunities for students to continue to develop their ethical and professional awareness, and opportunities to continue the process of self-reflection. 

     

    NB: This module is mandatory for progression to the MSc in Adult or Child Psychotherapy.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 37.00 Independent   : 163.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Enable students to locate psychodynamic thinking and its influences with the broader field of therapeutic approaches

    • Enable students to understand core psychodynamic theory and associated counselling skills

    • Further develop students’ awareness of ethical issues in counselling

    • Enable students to understand and critically reflect on the contribution the psychodynamic tradition makes to counselling theory and practice.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Articulate an understanding of the psychodynamic tradition and its modern applications in counselling practice

    • Critically evaluate central elements of that approach with those of other main therapeutic approaches

    • Synthesise psychodynamic understanding with counselling skills practice

    • Demonstrate an awareness and understanding of conscious and unconscious process in counselling

    • Critically evaluate counselling skills sessions using psychodynamic concepts and understandings

    • Critically reflect on the implications of diversity on psychodynamic theory and practice 

    • Evidence the ability to use written communication clearly, coherently and grammatically, within a given structure, using the standard referencing techniques of the discipline, demonstrating effective choice and organisation of material

    • Make critical judgements and evaluations, identifying general principles and evaluating competing perspectives 

    • Work autonomously, setting personal goals and deadlines as appropriate in order to complete set tasks

    • Extend subject knowledge through independent appraisal of a range of learning resources

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Critical Essay, 2000 words

    Component 2 - 50% Reflective Commentary, 2000 words

  5. DIVERSITY IN COUNSELLING
    (Optional) cou606
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    Module Summary:
    This module explores the wide diversity present in the human population and the ways in which groups with certain characteristics experience discrimination. We will develop a personal understanding of our own and others experiences in relation to difference and the ways in which these can impact upon our relationships and in particular the therapeutic relationship.

    CATS Value: 20

    ECTS Value: 10

    Contact Hours:

    Scheduled: 37 (Lectures & Seminars: 36; Drop-in tutorial time: 1)
    Independent: 163
    Placement: 0
    Total Hours: 200

    Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
    This module aims to:

    • Enable students to explore diversity and the ways it impacts upon counselling & psychotherapy.
    • Enable students reflect on their own background and culture
    • Enable students to develop a critical awareness of issues relating to diversity.

    Learning Opportunities:
    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Have a critical self-awareness of their own background and self in relation to diversity.
    • Identify the impact of discrimination and prejudice
    • Describe how diversity can impact upon relationships
    • Critically evaluate the impact of diversity on counselling
    • Create a personal action plan to further develop anti-discriminatory practice.

    Assessment:

    Component 1: 20 % Reflective statements of learning (1500 words)

    Component 2: 80 % Critical essay on diversity and counselling (3500 words)
  6. ADVANCED COUNSELLING SKILLS
    (Optional) cou607
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module is for year 3 students who wish to gain direct access to the MSc in Integrative Psychotherapy or Psychotherapeutic Counselling. It continues the process of the development of professional counselling skills in preparation for clinical placement in year 1 of the MSc. The module guides students through the counselling process from the point of referral, to the first session, middle stages and ending of the counselling relationship. It also introduces students to the role and importance of supervision.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 75.00 Independent : 125.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Provide students seeking professional qualifications in Psychotherapy with an opportunity to develop the requisite knowledge and skill for entry onto the MSc in  Integrative Psychotherapy
    • Develop and consolidate practical counselling skills
    • Enable students to build upon their skills and to learn to reflect upon the counselling process
    • Provide a firm foundation for students' understanding of how to structure a counselling session and a series of counselling sessions
    • Provide a solid foundation for students to prepare for a counselling placement, through introducing them to the main aspects of the process of work with a client (before the session, assessment, first sessions, middle stages and endings).
    • Develop a sound knowledge and awareness of the basic ethical issues and concepts relevant when using counselling skills.
    • Begin to explore issues of difference and their potential impact on the counselling relationship

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Appraise the importance of reflecting on the process of counselling.
    • Synthesise an understanding of the ethical and practical aspects of counselling related to the maintenance of professional boundaries.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the process involved in forming and sustaining a therapeutic relationship and secure therapeutic frame.
    • Identify and appraise ways in which the therapeutic frame can be disrupted and the impact of this on the counselling process
    • Critically reflect on how issues of difference between the counsellor and client may affect the counselling process
    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the different stages and types of therapeutic relationship, and the influence of a range of factors including client and therapist factors, and issues of context.
    • Appraise and apply relevant parts of the ethical framework specified by relevant professional bodies.
    • Identify and evaluate the ways in which personal issues may impact on the counselling and the range of personal and professional resources available to counsellors.
    • Demonstrate the use of counselling skills to facilitate and reflect on a short counselling session.
    • Manage client material safely and ethically. 


     

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - % PASS OR FAIL ELEMENT: LEARNING STATEMENT, 1000 WORDS

    Component 2 - 50% RECORDING OF A PRACTICE COUNSELLING SESSION, 20 MINUTES

    Component 3 - 50% TRANSCRIPT AND CRITICAL COMMENTARY, 3000 WORDS

  7. THERAPEUTIC WORK WITH COUPLES
    (Optional) cou608
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    Module Summary:
    The module will introduce the student to the theories, process and practice of therapeutic work with couples and will include working with individuals with a couple focus. A variety of theories of couple work will be introduced and critically evaluated and students will be encouraged to make links between theories.

    CATS Value: 20

    ECTS Value: 10

    Contact Hours:

    Scheduled: 37 (Lectures & Seminars: 36; Drop-in tutorial time: 1)
    Independent: 163
    Placement: 0
    Total Hours: 200

    Pre-Requirements: Joint Honours counselling studies students must have taken the psychodynamic module in semester 1

    Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
    This module aims to:

    • Develop a comprehensive and critical understanding of theories of couples counselling
    • Develop an appreciation of the unique issues in counselling more than one client.

    Learning Opportunities:
    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Critically examine a range of theories for working with more than one client.
    • Identify ways in which theories could be combined to enhance the theoretic work.
    • Outline the practical issues when working with more than one client.

    Assessment:

    Component 1: 30 % Individual 10 minute presentation on either diversity issues or the practical issues, related to couple counselling and give written feedback to one other student (750 words).

    Component 2: 70 % Critical essay comparing and contrasting two theories of couple counselling (3000 words).
  8. ADVANCED CBT
    (Optional) cou617
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    Module Summary:
    This module gives students knowledge of the most recent developments within Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. There will be a focus on how to apply cognitive behavioural approaches to practice, and an opportunity to critically reflect upon third wave cognitive behavioural concepts. There will be opportunities for students to continue to develop and critically reflect upon their ethical and professional awareness, and continue the process of self-reflection.

    CATS Value: 20

    ECTS Value: 10

    Contact Hours:

    Scheduled: 37 (Lectures & Seminars: 36: Drop-in tutorial time: 1)
    Independent: 163
    Placement: 0
    Total Hours: 200

    Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
    This module aims to:

    • Enable students to further increase their knowledge of theory within the Cognitive Behavioural approach
    • Further develop students’ awareness of ethical issues in counselling
    • Enable students to enhance their understanding of how to apply cognitive behavioural approaches within therapeutic practice
    • Enable students to critically evaluate current cognitive behavioural concepts in the light of other theories
    • Use a range of resources, CBT tools and the Code of Ethics to identify and overcome problems and difficulties

    Learning Opportunities:
    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Critically consider cognitive behavioural approaches to the treatment of common mental health difficulties
    • Articulate an understanding of recent developments within cognitive behavioural counselling
    • Critically consider how recent developments might impact upon their own working
    • Critically compare recent cognitive behavioural concepts to concepts in other traditions
    • Critically reflect on future avenues for professional development within CBT
    • Evidence the ability to use written communication clearly, coherently and grammatically, within a given structure, using the standard referencing techniques of the discipline, demonstrating effective choice and organisation of material
    • Make critical judgements and evaluations, identifying general principles and evaluating competing perspectives
    • Work autonomously, setting personal goals and deadlines as appropriate in order to complete set tasks
    • Extend subject knowledge through independent appraisal of a range of learning resources

    Assessment:

    Component 1: 50% Essay (1000 words)
    A critical essay on therapeutic work using CBT

    Component 2: 50% Case Study (2000 words)
    Analysis of a hypothetical case study in the light of CBT approaches to working therapeutically with psychological distress
  9. CAPSTONE PROJECTS
    (Optional) wwu601
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module provides students with the opportunity to explore an area of particular interest through undertaking a small project supported by a member of staff from the subject area (or elsewhere) with appropriate specialist knowledge. Students select one of three options, either; a dissertation, the “open talent” project in conjunction with the Foyer Federation, OR a consultancy project.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 26.00 Independent   : 374.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 400.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Enable students to identify a research or workplace problem and articulate a question/hypothesis relevant to one of the three projects to which they have opted.
    • Enable students to acquire and apply a breadth of knowledge about the issue or phenomena in which they are engaged
    • Enable students to select appropriate methods in relation to identified research or workplace purposes (open talent project, consultancy, or dissertation ) and justify their employment
    • Support students in the development, revision and refinement of their project design
    • Promote effective autonomous practice in the organisation and management of small-scale project.
    • Enable students to develop creative and innovative approaches to disseminating project findings.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:          

    • Demonstrate a breadth of knowledge and understanding of the issue or phenomena in which they have been engaged
    • Locate appropriate methods in relation to their chosen area of study
    • Understand the basic principles of effective project design
    • Know about some of the key contemporary thinking in their chosen area of study
    • Identify a research or workplace problem and articulate relevant question/hypothesis
    • Work autonomously in the management of a small scale project with guidance from an allocated supervisor
    • Present a coherent study – either through written means or more creative methods - that details the choice of field of study, methods, and findings
    • Develop their capacity for critical reflection and questioning.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Dissertation (10,000 words) or 'Open Talent' Project (10,000 word equivalent) or Consultancy Project (10,000 words)

  10. SAFEGUARDING AND CHILD PROTECTION IN POLICY AND PRACTICE
    (Compulsory) wwu603
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will provide students with the opportunity to explore historical and contemporary concerns that have served to shape policy and practice. Students will explore current legislation and its implications for practice for all those working with the young and vulnerable adults. A clearer understanding will be gained of the different roles and responsibilities of those working in the area of safeguarding. Consideration will be given to the impact that abuse can have on the lives of victims and their families.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Give students an understanding of the different forms of abuse and neglect that some children and young people experience in their day-to-day lives
    • Develop students’ ability to demonstrate how and why the policy and practice focus of safeguarding has changed over time
    • Critically evaluate how current legislation is likely to impact on safeguarding children and vulnerable adults
    • Explore the different roles and responsibilities that professional undertake in child protection and of the tensions and contradictions which can arise from this.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the way in which policy and practice for safeguarding has developed
    • Outline and analyse the content and intentions of key legislation within the area of safeguarding and child protection
    • Understand the forms that abuse can take and its implications for both victims and practitioners
    • Investigate and debate key issues facing practitioners working in this area.
    • Demonstrate an ability to synthesise arguments and understand the different principles that can inform practice
    • Apply different theoretical perspectives to develop an improved understanding of safeguarding and child protection work.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Essay (3500 words)

  11. WORKING WITH FAMILIES FACING VIOLENCE AND HARM
    (Optional) wwu604
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module explores some practical challenges of working with families where there are concerns around violence, harm and/or abuse.  It seeks to explore different ways of thinking about vulnerability and risk and how this relates to the ways in which families are constructed in policy and practice. It also seeks to look at key practice issues around working with family members and other professionals.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Build critical understanding of issues relating to domestic violence and other harm within the family, including the human rights context and concepts of ‘vulnerability’, ‘harm’ and ‘violence’
    • Explore the way in which families, are constructed by policy and practice in this area, including perspectives from outside the UK
    • Encourage a nuanced view of risk factors and connections between victimisation and perpetrating violence, and between violence and concerns such as substance misuse
    • Address tensions in policy regarding safeguarding, partnership working and supporting families to achieve their own solutions.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the challenges and opportunities in working with families exposed to violence and harm.
    • Discuss and challenge misconceptions and stereotypes in this area with reference to literature and policy.
    • Critically evaluate representations of violence and harm and models of working with families.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of wider cultural issues relating to harm and violence including perspectives from outside the UK.
    • Critique policy and practice examples balancing the needs of adults and children and between protection, rights and self-efficacy.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% DIGITAL STORY EXPLORING AN ASPECT OF WORKING WITH THOSE EXPERIENCING VIOLENCE AND HARM

    Component 2 - 50% EVALUATIVE COMMENTARY LOCATING THE 'DIGITAL STORY' IN ITS POLICY AND PRACTICE CONTEXT

  12. OVERCOMING INEQUALITIES IN SOCIETY
    (Optional) wwu609
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module builds on a series of inequalities modules in the WWCYPF Programme (e.g. WWU401, WWU503, WWU508). The module will begin to explore the social history of a range of movements (for example the Labour Movement; the Women’s Movement; the Disability Movement; the Civil Rights Movement; the Gay Rights Movement, etc.) that have challenged inequalities and issues of social justice.  The module will also analyse why and how the movements came into existence, and critically reflect on how successful they were/are and what has been learned about overcoming inequalities.   

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Explore issues of inequalities through the lens of social history.
    • Examine the ideological, philosophical and social constructs that lead to inequalities.
    • Critically explore the social history of a range of movements that have challenged issues of inequality.
    • Critically reflect on why these movements were/are needed and consider how successful they have been in tackling inequalities.
    • Analyse what we have learned about overcoming inequalities, through examining the stories and experiences of these movements.

     

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Research the social history and roles of collective movements in attempting to address inequalities.
    • Critically evaluate what impact social movements have had on issues of inequality and social justice.
    • Critically reflect on what has been learned, from these movements, about approaches to overcoming inequalities and issues of social justice.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Booklet (4000 word equivalent)

  13. WORKING WITH COMMUNITIES
    (Optional) wwu610
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    Module Summary:
    This module takes a critical look at the way professionals work with, in or alongside communities. It will examine the different philosophies that are implicit in terms such as ‘community development’, ‘community work’ and ‘community education’. Students will be introduced to competing and sometimes conflicting theories in this field of study and will be expected to engage with and critically analyse terms such as ‘empowerment’, accountability, democracy and representation. The module will also allow students to consider the impact of these theoretical models on their own behaviour as practitioners.

    Contact Hours:

    Scheduled: 36
    Independent: 164
    Placement: 0
    Total Hours: 200

    Module Curriculum Led Outcomes:
    This module aims to:

    • Provide students with an understanding of the complex nature of the debate around how best to work in and alongside communities
    • Encourage students to develop a critical interpretation of the role of the community development worker
    • Engage with contentious ideas about community work from different sectoral perspectives
    • Analyse the impact of this debate on current practice in the field of WCYPF

    Learning Opportunities:
    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Engage with theoretical models of community work, community development and community education
    • Develop a critical appreciation of the history and role of the community development worker
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the key thinkers and ideas that have shaped the debate
    • Apply this understanding to current practice
    • Look in more detail at specific sets of ideas or discourses that may have significance for future service development.

    Assessment:

    Component 1: 100% Portfolio of work that should include:
  14. NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT
    (Optional) plu601
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module offers students the opportunity to build on their level 5 work placement through the more developed application of a negotiated work-based research project. Students will agree with their placement tutor and workplace mentor a brief for a project which addresses a need within the organisation. Learners should complete a minimum of 100 hours in the work place. It is in the spirit of this module that wherever possible, the focus will be on social or community / sustainable development.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 276.00 Placement   : 100.00 Total   : 400.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Enable students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing a negotiated work-based research project

    • Encourage students to use appropriate work-based research methods

    • Enable students to work collaboratively in a work setting, establishing continuity from their previous work placement and offering tangible evidence of building on this prior experience, where possible

    • Generate confidence and security in students’ employability on graduation

     

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Secure, negotiate and design a work-based research project

    • Develop an understanding of, and apply, research methods that are appropriate to work-based contexts

    • Interpret gathered information

    • Make a clear and productive contribution to the organization through the development of recommendations arising from the work-based research project

    • Present a creatively engaging argument

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT (8000 WORDS)

  15. WORKING WITH ADDICTIONS
    (Optional) cou611
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will introduce theories of addictions, and ways of working therapeutically with addictions. Definitions and explanations of addiction and addictive/compulsive behaviour will be explored. It will principally focus on contemporary approaches, methods of assessment and treatment plans. A range of effective ways of working therapeutically with addictions will be introduced and critically evaluated.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 37.00 Independent : 163.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Develop an understanding of a range of addiction theories and treatment models.
    • Support students to understand ‘recovery approach’ and recovery focused interventions.
    • Enable student to understand key components of an comprehensive substance misuse focused assessment as well as key elements of a recovery focused client centred treatment plans.
    • Develop an understanding of addiction focused risk assessment and risk management approach.
    • Develop an understanding of relapse prevention strategies.
    • Facilitate students’ critical understanding of advantages and disadvantages of individual versus group based interventions.
    • Develop understanding of different types of addictions as well as extent of addiction – psychological and physiological.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Demonstrate accurate understanding of different addiction theories and treatment models.
    • Critically reflect on the implications of diversity on addiction treatment practice.
    • Demonstrate understanding of addiction focused assessment and treatment action plan.
    • Demonstrate understanding of key risk issues related to addiction issues and how to develop effective risk management plan.
    • Make critical evaluations of competing perspectives of different treatment theories and treatment models.
    • Demonstrate understanding and enhanced knowledge of a range of treatment options available for addiction as well as critically reflect on strengths and weaknesses of these models.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% CRITICAL ESSAY (2500 WORDS)