Criminology BA (Hons)

Honours Degree , Full-time

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Key Details

  • 3 Years
  • 88/96 Typical UCAS Tariff
  • L311 Course Code
  • Full Time
Criminology

Overview

Clearing places available to start this September

Call 0121 476 1181 find out more about applying via our Clearing webpages

Drawing on a wide range of concepts, models and comparative perspectives, this programme will engage you from the outset. You will quickly become immersed in fascinating contemporary debates about the role of the media in constructing crime as a social problem, about the causes and consequences of offending behaviour, and about ‘what works’ in terms of preventing, detecting and reducing crime. You will also critically examine the moral and ethical dimensions and purposes of punishment, and the dilemmas facing policy makers, practitioners and sentencers in their decision-making. The course benefits from regular  guest contributions from criminal justice professionals and other external expert  speakers who provide detailed insights into the practical aspects of responding to crime and its victims, as well as highlighting potential graduate employment opportunities in related fields.

Course content

The programme offers a varied, yet focused, choice of subjects through which you will be able to develop your interests within the specialised field of criminology. Year one establishes your broad understanding of the social sciences and issues of social inequality. It also introduces you to the many facets of criminology including criminal justice, criminological theory, psychology and sociology. As you progress through the programme you will explore different types of crime, including alcohol and drug-related offending, cybercrime, hate crime and white-collar crime.

You will deepen your understanding of the theoretical assumptions, ideologies and research evidence that frame and influence criminal justice policy in our increasingly globalised society. You will also have opportunities to undertake a work placement as part of your studies and,  in your final year dissertation, to pursue independent, in-depth research into a criminological topic of particular interest to you.

Career opportunities

This course progresses a broad range of transferable skills that are highly valued by employers in a wide range of work situations. Possible career destinations would include roles within policing, probation, prison service, victim support and youth offending teams, as well as opportunities for crime analysts and investigators in the expanding private security sector. Key skills in research methods, critical evaluation and analysis of data  and information, communication and teamwork are especially relevant to a variety of employment pathways within the criminal justice and community safety sphere.

Entry Requirements

September 2018 Entry Requirements

You must achieve either at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma), or a total of 88 points from a maximum of 3 A levels.

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9 M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

5 GCSEs at grade 4/C or above including English or a recognised equivalent are also required.

Contact details

ContactAdmissions Tel: 0121 476 1181 (Ext. 2378) Email: admissions@newman.ac.uk

Peter Harris (Senior Lecturer in Criminology) Tel: 0121 476 1181 (Ext. 2517) Email:info.criminology@newman.ac.uk

Directions

Course Fees

Fees per academic year: 2017/18 Full-time UK/EU Students: £9,250*

*Fees shown are for 2018/19 academic year. The University will review tuition fees and increase fees in line with any inflationary uplift as determined by the UK Government, if permitted by law or government policy, in subsequent years of your course. It is anticipated that such increases would be linked to RPI (the Retail Price Index excluding mortgage interest payments).

Additional Costs

A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is not required for entry into this programme, although it is in many cases required by employers before students can begin their Year 2 (level 5) work placement.  Find out more about completing the DBS application form and the related additional costs.

 

Additional Information

General Academic Regulations: Terms and Conditions for students attending our courses

  1. SEEING CRIME AND JUSTICE
    (Compulsory) cru401
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will introduce and explore ideas about Crime and Justice through looking at the way in which the media ‘constructs’ them. It will include an exploration of the role of the media, utilising key sociological concepts, which is then used as the basis for an exploration of the way in which crime and justice are constructed in a range of media contexts including news, drama and documentary and through a range of media outlets; printed media, TV and Film and digital media.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 48.00 Independent : 152.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Introduce key sociological concepts relevant to the study of crime, deviance and criminal justice .e.g. moral panics, social construction and discourse,  risk
    • Apply these to a range of media artefacts in order to understanding the role the media in constructing and reproducing discourses
    • Help students develop an understanding of the complex relationship between ‘fact’ , discourse and events
    • Introduce  relevant sociological/criminological theory, as well as practical strategies for media analysis
    • Use these examples to support students in developing appropriate skills in the selection and analysis of information.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Become familiar with and practise the application of key sociological ideas relevant to the study of crime and justice      
    • Interrogate a range of media resources using key sociological and criminological ideas
    • Acquire an understanding of the conventions and values that underpin crime news reporting
    • Assess the extent to which boundaries are 'blurred' between factual, fictional and reality media coverage of crime and justice.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 40% Group Presentation (15 minutes)

    Component 2 - 60% Reflective Account (2000 words)

  2. SOCIAL THEORIES OF CRIME
    (Compulsory) cru402
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module aims to develop students’ understanding of the main social theories of crime, its causation and prevention. What is crime? What causes crime? Can society cause crime? During the module students will be introduced to the principal sociological theories that have emerged during the history of the discipline of criminology. These will include theories that locate the cause of crime in social change, poverty, culture, social structure and rational choice.

    To help explain the various theories the module will use a series of real world examples to help students evaluate how applicable each explanation is to a range of crimes. These will include violent, financial, sexual and racial-aggravated crime.  The content of this module will provide a foundation for a range of level five and six modules and it is anticipated that the theories student study in this module will be deployed in these subsequent modules.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 24.00 Independent : 76.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Develop students’ understanding of the key sociological approaches within criminology.
    • Enable students to engage with the key theories that seek to explain the phenomenon of crime.
    • Assist students to understand the inter-relations between different social theories of crime and how these theories draw on, refine and develop previous theoretical models.
    • Develop students ability to process complex ideas and present them in a synthesised and accessible way
    • Facilitate students’ ability to utilise theoretical models to seek to explain real world examples of crime.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Describe and examine a range of key concepts and theoretical approaches within criminology.
    • Apply these theoretical approaches to real world situations.
    • Explore the limitations of criminological theories to explain the full range of crimes.
    • Communicate and synthesise effectively in both verbal and written formats.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Poster Presentation

  3. THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE ENVIRONMENT
    (Compulsory) cru404
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module introduces core areas of criminology, focusing on the processes and systems which constitute criminal justice within the UK.  It aims to introduce students to varying ideas and concepts of crime and justice and the way these are socially and legally constructed.  The module will combine a practice oriented introduction to different stages, institutions and professional roles within justice systems with some theoretical influences on these.  The students gain an understanding of issues including prevention and management of crime, deviance and victimisation.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Introduce the criminal justice system in the UK including police and court processes
    • Examine the concepts and construction of crime and justice
    • Explore the processes of preventing and managing crime and deviance, and managing and preventing victimisation
    • Introduce some theoretical influences on the development of crime and justice policy.

     

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Demonstrate an understanding of the criminal justice system within the UK; and have a better understanding of the processes used to prevent and manage crime, deviance and victimisation
    • Gain an understanding of the broad concepts of crime and justice in Britain, showing awareness of how these are socially and legally constructed
    • Explore the way different theoretical approaches within criminology have influenced crime and justice policy
    • Discuss the processes involved within a court situation applying learning about the roles of different professionals
    • Debate theoretical influences on the processes of managing crime and victimisation.

     

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Essay (2500 words)

  4. THE PSYCHOLOGY OF CRIME
    (Compulsory) cru405
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will examine what the field of psychological theory can contribute to the multidisciplinary study of crime. It will enable students to adjust to the demands of learning at degree level, equipping them with a basic understanding of relevant concepts from the field of Psychology, Social Psychology and Developmental Psychology. This will provide students with a theoretical basis for the study of individual dimensions to deviance, criminal behaviour, offending, victimisation and desistance. Students will gain confidence in the use of language and be able to clearly define key concepts, in preparation for later research and work related learning.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Introduce students to relevant schools of psychological theory (e.g. Psychodynamic, Humanistic, Behaviourist, and Cognitive).
    • Develop students understanding of key concepts and theories in developmental and social psychology including theories of the self, personality, attachment, identity, learning, cognitive, moral and identity development, attitudes, prejudice, and aggression.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Engage in debates about the relative merits of psychological theory when seeking to understand criminal and deviant behaviour
    • Demonstrate sound knowledge of the basic underlying theoretical, conceptual and methodological frameworks within psychology, social psychology and developmental psychology
    • Evaluate and interpret that theory within the context of the criminal justice system and develop lines of argument in accordance with those frameworks.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - % Pass or Fail Element: Essay Plan (500 words)

    Component 2 - 100% Essay (3000 words)

  5. UNDERSTANDING SOCIAL RESEARCH
    (Compulsory) cru406
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Quantitative research is widely used in when studying society, particularly in criminological study. In order to analyse and interpret research it is essential to have a working knowledge of quantitative research and data. This module will introduce key concepts in quantitative methods and analysis so that students are able to understand and critique quantitative research. The module will also provide students with an opportunity, in groups, to carry out a small scale piece of quantitative research, including experiencing the process of obtaining ethical approval.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Introduce key concepts in quantitative research
    • Explore the use of statistics in understanding society
    • Introduce students to the role of ethics in research
    • Discuss the links of quantitative research with Criminology.
    • Provide students an opportunity to carry out a small scale research project.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Understand key quantitative research concepts 
    • Discuss the use of quantitative methods
    • Critique the uses of quantitative research
    • Understand the importance of ethics and obtain ethical approval for their project.
    • Understand the theories of society behind quantitative research
    • Apply their understanding to quantitative research on crime and society.

     

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Group Survey and Report (1000 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Research Analysis Exercise (1000 words)

  6. INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING
    (Compulsory) plu404
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module aims to equip students with the knowledge and self-management skills to make informed choices in preparing for work placement and the transition to employment or further study on graduation.  

    Learners will be provided with the opportunities to develop awareness of the workplace, identify different career and study options, recognise and articulate their own experience, accomplishments and talents and plan and implement career management strategies for the short and long term.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 12.00 Independent : 88.00 Placement : Total :  100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Support students in developing informed choices about the career pathways available to them, in relation to their subject choices.
    • Prepare students for work-based learning and the application / exploration of subject knowledge in the workplace.

    • Encourage students to make connections between their learning, placement choice, future job aspirations and contribution to society.

    • Enable students to build confidence in securing work placements and future employment.

    • Support students in reflecting upon their preparation for their work placement and future employment.  

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

    1. Examine how their experiences, accomplishments, and abilities relate to employer expectations.

    2. Demonstrate engagement with, and an understanding of, graduate employment pathways and employability issues relating to their own career aspirations.

    3. Research organisations for the purposes of securing a work placement.

    4. Reflect upon their learning and development.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Reflective Essay and Appendix, 2000 words

  7. THE SOCIOLOGICAL IMAGINATION
    (Compulsory) wwu404
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Sociological concepts underpin our understandings of society, communities and families. This module will explore the sociological imagination by applying key theories to examples in contemporary society. The module will include examinations of classical sociological theorists including Marx, Durkheim and Weber as well as more contemporary sociology including Critical Race Theory, Feminist Perspectives and Postmodern approaches. The module will also consider the role of the media and discourse in shaping understandings and also critiques of the sociological canon as gendered and Eurocentric.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Explore and critique key theoretical concepts in sociology.
    • Apply sociological concepts to understanding society
    • Engage in a critical analysis of constructions of the family and community in relation to sociological concepts
    • Examine the role the media and discourse have in shaping understandings of society.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Critical examine sociological theory using contemporary examples.
    • Critically evaluate the role of the media and discourse in influencing concepts of society.
    • Critique the sociological canon.
    • Sociologically critique conceptions of the family and community.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 40% Group Presentation (15 minutes)

    Component 2 - 60% Essay (2000 words)

  1. QUALITATIVE CRIMINOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS
    (Compulsory) cru500
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module aims to develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the use of qualitative research methodology within criminology by introducing students to a range of practical examples of criminological research projects. Through exposing students to a number of visiting speakers along with some taught input, it will explore how real life researchers have approached a range of issues pertinent to conducting qualitative criminological research including acquiring ethical approval, conducting a literature review, gathering and analysing data, and presenting their results to audiences. Students will explore a number of qualitative methodologies and methods including action research, ethnography, life history/narrative case study research, participant observation, focus groups and interviewing.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 24.00 Independent : 76.00 Placement : Total :  100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Explore and evaluate their own application of qualitative research methodology and methods within criminology including, for example action research and ethnography, interviews, participant observation, life story work and case studies.

    • Enable students to understand how to develop qualitative research designs that are fit for purpose and meet ethical requirements.

    • Enable students to understand how to conduct a literature review

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Offer definitions for and discuss a range of qualitative research terminology

    • Understand the processes involved in carrying out a qualitative research project

    • Understand how to ensure that ethical considerations are in place when conducting research

    • Conduct a pilot study and reflect on the process          

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% 2,000 word individual written report

  2. POLICING, PUNISHMENT AND SOCIAL CONTROL
    (Compulsory) cru503
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will start by considering a range of conceptual and theoretical approaches towards social control and will explore how these are reflected in policy and agency approaches towards crime control and penal sanctions. 

    The module considers the historical and social background to the emergence of professional policing and of the use of imprisonment as a punishment. Students will analyse the assumptions and ideologies that underpin the use of discretion by decision makers within the justice process, and their implications for offenders, victims and on wider public opinion, as reflected in media and official discourses surrounding policing and punishment. 

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Develop students’ theoretical understanding of social control and the strategies employed by societies to regulate and control criminal behaviour, and to sanction and punish transgressors 
    • Equip students with a sound knowledge of the social and historical development of public policing, its contemporary organisation and the nature and culture of police work
    • Develop students’ understanding of the social and historical development of penal institutions, the philosophy and politics of criminal justice and modes of punishment, and offenders’ and victims’ experiences of the penal process 
    • Contribute to students’ critical awareness of issues of discretion, discrimination and diversity within the crime control arena
    • Refine students’ digital literacy skills in relation to the location, search, retrieval and evaluation of relevant source material

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Debate the nature of social control with reference to appropriate theoretical models       
    • Examine a range of perspectives on policing and punishment and locate these in their social and historical contexts
    • Critically appraise the fairness and consequences for offenders and victims of various institutional approaches to crime control, with reference to issues of human rights and public protection
    • Plan and execute a piece of rigorous enquiry, including the production of a report which recognises the criminological implications of their findings

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 30% Group Presentation (20 minutes)

    Component 2 - 70% Examination (2 hours)

  3. CRIME AND POWER
    (Compulsory) cru504
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Analysis of crime in society often focuses on street crimes and those offences committed by deprived sections of society. This module will focus on the relationship between crime and power and will examine the crimes committed by the powerful. White Collar Crime, State Crime and Environmental Crime will be explored and the definition of ‘crime’ itself will be critiqued and analysed. The notion of ‘social harm’ that crimes of the powerful can have on society will also be explored. Particular attention will be paid to the power of the state to both define and police ‘crime’. The role of the media in shaping perceptions of crime will also be explored.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Examine the definition of ‘crime’
    • Explore White Collar, State Crime and Environmental Crime
    • Examine the relationship between crime and power and the concept of social harm.
    • Discuss the power of state to define and police crime
    • Explore the role of the media in shaping perceptions of crime.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Critically evaluate definitions of crime 
    • Understand White Collar, State and Environmental Crime
    • Critique the role of the state in defining and policing crime
    • Analyse the relationship between crime, power and social harm.
    • Critique the role of the media in shaping understandings of crime.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 25% Report on Newspaper Article (1000 words)

    Component 2 - 75% Essay (3000 words)

  4. CRIME AND SOCIETY
    (Compulsory) cru505
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module aims to develop students’ critical understanding of central debates concerning crime in contemporary society.  Students will engage with a range of theoretical and conceptual approaches to understanding crime, offending behaviour and victimisation, including the extent to which crime should be viewed as an individual pathology, or the consequences of social strain, or mass-mediated moral panic. 

    The module will focus on selected topics in relation to the social construction of crime and victimisation, and policy and agency responses to them.  The module will consider the social dimensions of different types of crime and the ways in which these are represented in the media, public opinion and official discourses.  Crimes considered will include homicide and violence, alcohol and drug related offending, cyber-crime and youth crime.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Develop students’ appreciation of the scope of criminology as an interdisciplinary field of study
    • Develop students’ critical understanding of key concepts and theoretical approaches within criminology
    • Engage students with ‘live’ debates on crime and provide opportunities to apply appropriate criminological perspectives in analysis and explanation
    • Enhance students’ awareness of the criminal justice process in action, and the values and assumptions that underpin the practices and responses of key agencies and institutions working within it.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Identify and appraise different sources of data related to crime and victimisation
    • Describe and examine a range of key concepts and theoretical approaches within criminology
    • Recognise and critique values and processes underpinning criminal justice agency responses to crime
    • Communicate and synthesise effectively in appropriate written formats

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Briefing Paper/Policy Report (2000 words)

  5. INTERVENTIONS, JUSTICE AND CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES
    (Compulsory) cru507
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will provide students with the opportunity to explore the range of court disposals and interventions used across the criminal justice system.  The module will include an investigation of theoretical ideas of punishment and rehabilitation as well as the policy ideas of ‘what works’ and ‘evidence based practice’.  Consideration will be given to the importance of justice and proportionality alongside the rights of victims and the role of the community.  A clearer understanding will be gained of some key treatment models which will be examined thoroughly using critical discussion and research.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Give students a critical understanding of the range of criminal justice disposals and interventions
    • Develop students’ ability to demonstrate the influence of theoretical ideas regarding punishment, rehabilitation and justice
    • Critically evaluate alternative punishment, treatment and intervention models using research evidence and informed discussion
    • Explore the rights and potential roles of victims, offenders and the wider community and build understanding of the tensions and contradictions arising

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the influences on policy and practice for sentencing and treatment of offenders.
    • Understand the range of court disposals and interventions used within the criminal justice system.
    • Use evidence and critical discussion to compare alternative methods of intervention and treatment.
    • Investigate and debate key issues facing practitioners working in this area.
    • Demonstrate an ability to synthesise arguments and understand the different principles that can inform practice.
    • Apply different theoretical perspectives to develop an improved understanding of models of punishment and treatment of offenders

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Essay (3500 words)

  6. RESEARCH PROPOSAL
    (Compulsory) cru520
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will ready students to begin their level 6 Capstone Project. Initial group lectures will introduce and explain the two possible routes through the level 6 Criminology Capstone Project (empirical and project based). Further lectures and personal tutorials will provide guidance and support so students can conceive their research question/topic. Students will then be allocated a supervisor from within or outside the criminology team who will help them hone their question/topic, guide students through the ethical approval process, and suggest possible literature sources for their proposed project. Students will be shown how to search for literature using the library catalogue and academically appropriate internet search engines. Students will then develop a detailed research proposal and plan on the basis of which they can begin work on their extended project or dissertation.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 24.00 Independent : 76.00 Placement : Total :  100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Enable students to conceive a viable research question/topic for their level 6 capstone project
    • Identify a suitable supervisor from within or outside the staff team
    • Support students in the submission of a research ethics application
    • Enable students to develop and justify a methodological approach leading to the production of a research proposal

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Develop and justify an approach to their capstone project with their allocated supervisor
    • Learn how to search for that literature using the library catalogue and appropriate academic internet search engines
    • Develop a plan for an appropriate and ethically sound extended project/dissertation

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Research Proposal 2000 words

  7. WORK PLACEMENT
    (Compulsory) plu502
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 10.00 Independent : 90.00 Placement : 100.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement in a workplace setting.

    • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement and of their independent learning throughout the experience.

    • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.

    • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.

    • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to: 

    1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.

    2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.

    3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.

    4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

     

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - % PLACEMENT REGISTRATION FORM

    Component 2 - 60% WORK PLACEMENT REFLECTION (2500 WORDS)

    Component 3 - 40% WORK PLACEMENT EVALUATION: DIGITAL RESOURCE (1500 WORDS EQUIVALENT)

  1. DISSERTATION
    (Optional) cru601
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module provides students with the opportunity to explore an area of particular interest through undertaking empirical research (either qualitative or quantitative) supported by a member of staff from the subject area (or elsewhere) with appropriate specialist knowledge. Students will produce a formal written thesis in line with the University’s guidelines.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 29.00 Independent : 371.00 Placement : Total :  400.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Enable students to identify a viable research question/hypothesis and apply a breadth of knowledge about the issue or phenomena in which they are engaged.
    • Enable students to select, revise and refine appropriate methods in relation to their identified research question/topic and justify their employment.
    • Enable students to present a coherent written study that details methods, findings and conclusions.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Critically assess the issue or phenomena in which they have been engaged.
    • Critically reflect on some of the key contemporary thinking within the criminological field. 
    • Locate and justify appropriate methods in relation to their chosen area of study and understand the principles of effective research design.
    • Work autonomously with guidance from an allocated supervisor.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% 10,000 word dissertation

  2. CRIMINOLOGY EXTENDED PROJECT
    (Optional) cru602
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module provides students with the opportunity to explore an area of particular interest to them, such as an aspect of social policy (historical or current) in the area of crime/criminal justice or a social problem related to crime and criminal behaviour. Students will first undertake an extended literature review (in semester one) and then convert the findings into an accessible, engaging resource for an identified audience, such as community groups or policy makers (in semester two).

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 29.00 Independent : 371.00 Placement : Total :  400.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Enable students to identify an issue or policy within the field of criminology worthy of in depth study.
    • Enable students to acquire and apply a breadth of knowledge about that issue or policy.
    • Enable students to undertake a critical review of the literature in their chosen area of study.
    • Enable students to produce a resource for an identified audience that critically evaluates their issue and communicates their findings appropriately and imaginatively.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Demonstrate a breadth of knowledge and understanding of the issue with which they have been engaged.
    • Locate appropriate literature in relation to their chosen area of study.
    • Critically reflect on key contemporary thinking in their chosen area of study.
    • Present a resource such as a report, poster, leaflet, digital resource that critically engages with their chosen study and communicates key findings to a specified audience.
    • Develop their capacity for critical reflection and questioning.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Literature Based Review 5000 words

    Component 2 - 50% Resource 5000 words

  3. COMPARATIVE CRIMINAL JUSTICE
    (Optional) cru603
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module seeks to broaden students’ comparative understanding of criminal justice by locating it in an international context.  Using selected focal topics, it will heighten critical awareness of different models in use in responding to crime, deviance, victims and harm.

    It will draw on examples from a number of comparator jurisdictions which may include Scotland, The Netherlands, China, Japan and the United States.  Students will be encouraged to access independently international source material in order to prepare a presentation and brief for a Justice Minister on a selected topic.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 24.00 Independent : 176.00 Placement : Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    •  Develop critical analysis in assessing the merits and limitations of competing perspectives on crime and justice system responses
    •  Place in comparative and transnational contexts key debates in respect of human rights in relation to treatment of offenders and victims
    •  Provide students with the opportunity to research, execute and present independently research material in appropriate formats

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Engage in debates about the efficacy of different jurisdictional response to crime, deviance and victims

    • Critically assess the human rights and public protection benefits of differing approaches to crime control and punishment, and place these in their political and social contexts

    • Work autonomously and with others, recognising the ethical implications of their research and enquiry

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 25% Presentation/Debate (20 minutes)

    Component 2 - 75% Brief (2500 words)

  4. EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
    (Compulsory) cru604
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will provide the basis for students to critically examine the relationship between crime, the criminal justice system and the increasingly fluid and intersectional social categories of ‘race’, culture, religion, gender, and sexuality. Using national and international contemporary theoretical perspectives, students will examine how these manifest within the context of crime in late modern Britain. Indicative content will include examination of: the pervasiveness of racialised discourses within criminal justice; disproportionality in the prison system sentencing and the use of Police powers; the relationship between the social construction of masculinities and criminal behaviour; developing trends in crime committed by women; experiences of perpetrators and victims of racist and homophobic hate crime; and how Islamophobia is shaping both public perceptions of, and criminal justice policy directed at, the British Muslim community. Through their own reflective writing and the use of a range of visual methods/resources, students will be challenged to critically evaluate how they as potential practitioners are situated within structures of power and privilege and how their own inhabiting of multiple identities will be implicated in their efforts to challenge the inequalities that persist within the criminal justice system.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Critically examine how discourses of difference permeate criminal justice.

    • Critically evaluate how theoretical frames such as Feminism, Critical Race Theory and Intersectionality inform the study of criminology.

    • Enable students to recognise how they are located within these discourses as individuals with their own biographical experiences and multiple identities.

    • Enable students to explore how their own professional practice can challenge hegemonic power relations as they manifest in criminal justice.

       

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Analyse film, theatre and ethnodramatic portrayals of crime.

    • Hear visiting speakers from within the professional and local communities.       

    • Examine their own and others different experiences and perceptions of crime.

    • Research and articulate a coherent position on the operation of inequality within criminal justice.

    • Research and articulate how their own subjectivity shapes their perception of crime and criminal offenders.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Reflective Auto Ethnographic Account (4500 words)

  5. CRIME, PLACE AND SPACE
    (Optional) cru605
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will engage students in a detailed conceptual analysis of crime, space and place. Crime needs to be understood in relation to the private and public spaces in which it is located, such as the home, urban environments, rural environments, the school, shopping malls, parks, the prison, the street, neighbourhoods, and council estates. The module will explore how (and by whom) spaces are controlled and how this leads to perceptions within communities as to how to behave. Spaces (such as neighbourhoods) can become privatised, gentrified, gendered and racialised, leading to disproportionate policing and criminalisation. Students will critically examine how systems designed to reduce crime and provide safety in certain spaces – e.g. surveillance, affect criminal behaviour and people living in, or travelling through those spaces. Students will be encouraged take an ethnographic approach to understand the interaction between crime, place and space by exploring a real life space and relating this to theoretical frames.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Critically examine the concepts of place and space in relation to crime and criminal justice.

    • Explore how spaces become racialised, gendered and ghettoised and how this is related to crime.

    • Critically discuss the impact of privatisation and gentrification on urban spaces.

    • Explain and explore ethnographic approaches to understanding the relationship of space and crime.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Critically evaluate the relationship of crime space and criminal justice.

    • Understand the power relations underlying the symbolic boundaries of space.

    • Conduct a small scale ethnographic study critically examining the construction of space in relation to crime and criminal justice.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Individual Presentation (4000 word equivalent)

  6. CRITICAL ISSUES IN FORENSIC INVESTIGATION
    (Optional) cru607
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will develop students’ knowledge and deepen their understanding of key investigative processes and techniques utilised in various forensic contexts.  It will integrate selected relevant theoretical perspectives from the field of forensic psychology with critical insights from applied criminology and policing studies.  A key reference point for the module will be Smith and Flanagan’s seminal (2000) Home Office research report, The Effective Detective: identifying the skills of an effective SIO.      

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Develop students’ critical understanding of how psychological knowledge can assist in the prevention of flawed evidence gathering and potential miscarriages of justice;

    • Enable students to critically assess the usefulness and limitations of tools designed to assist with eye witness identification and lie detection;

    • Promote critical reflection on the skillset one requires to develop as an effective investigative practitioner;

    • Engage students in the practical application of investigative interview techniques.

       

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Critically assess factors that make evidence reliable;   

    • Explain how knowledge of forensic psychological perspectives can help in obtaining evidence from witnesses and suspects;

    • Assess the utility and validity of the polygraph as an investigative tool 

    • Produce an ‘expert witness’ portfolio to demonstrate their learning and critical reflections. 

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% PORTFOLIO (4500 WORDS)

  7. YOUNG PEOPLE AND CRIME
    (Compulsory) cru609
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module critically examines a range of criminological theory, both historical and contemporary, that seeks to explain why young people commit crime and how it has and continues to inform governmental responses to youth crime. This will include some discussion of current policy and legislation and an analysis of structures within the British Criminal Justice System (focusing on England and Wales) such as Youth Offending Teams. Particular focus will be on how young peoples’ criminal behaviour is interpreted and contested in the media and political discourses and how youth crime policy impacts disproportionately on certain groups of young people within society (e.g. black young people, young people who meet on the street, etc.). A recurrent theme will be how current models of work with young people involved in crime and multi-professional efforts to bring about desistance from that behaviour may conflict with the workers reluctance to engage in social control.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 40.00 Independent : 160.00 Placement : Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Introduce students to fundamental concepts in criminology, looking at how these have developed over time in relation to young people, and how they can be applied to practice,

    • Analyse the legal framework around young people and crime (including the Criminal Justice System), the rationales behind its structure and young people’s experience of it,

    • Critically reflect on current discourse, policy and practice around young people and crime,

    • Introduce students to the skills, knowledge and understanding needed to work within the Youth Justice system.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Examine and critically appraise a range of theories which seek to explain youth crime    

    • Consider a range of responses and strategies designed to bring about desistance from crime

    • Hear visiting speakers from the youth justice field sharing their experiences of working with young offenders

    • Articulate a coherent personal position on the effectiveness of current policy responses to youth crime

    • Understand how those policy responses impact on a diverse range of young people.

       

      And demonstrate that he/she

       

    • Critically understands contexts  in which community and youth workers are employed including the distinctive cultures of third sector and faith organisations, and multi agency approaches

    • Is a professional who understands and can articulate their role as educators in relation to other professionals

    • Can organise and articulate of opinions and arguments in speech and writing, including justifying a personal position in relation to the subject.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% ESSAY, 3000 WORDS

  8. NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT
    (Optional) plu601
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module offers students the opportunity to build on their level 5 work placement through the more developed application of a negotiated work-based research project. Students will agree with their placement tutor and workplace mentor a brief for a project which addresses a need within the organisation. Learners should complete a minimum of 100 hours in the work place. It is in the spirit of this module that wherever possible, the focus will be on social or community / sustainable development.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 24.00 Independent : 276.00 Placement : 100.00 Total :  400.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Enable students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing a negotiated work-based research project

    • Encourage students to use appropriate work-based research methods

    • Enable students to work collaboratively in a work setting, establishing continuity from their previous work placement and offering tangible evidence of building on this prior experience, where possible

    • Generate confidence and security in students’ employability on graduation

     

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Secure, negotiate and design a work-based research project

    • Develop an understanding of, and apply, research methods that are appropriate to work-based contexts

    • Interpret gathered information

    • Make a clear and productive contribution to the organization through the development of recommendations arising from the work-based research project

    • Present a creatively engaging argument

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT (8000 WORDS)

  9. WORKING WITH FAMILIES FACING VIOLENCE AND HARM
    (Optional) wwu604
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module explores some practical challenges of working with families where there are concerns around violence, harm and/or abuse.  It seeks to explore different ways of thinking about vulnerability and risk and how this relates to the ways in which families are constructed in policy and practice. It also seeks to look at key practice issues around working with family members and other professionals.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Build critical understanding of issues relating to domestic violence and other harm within the family, including the human rights context and concepts of ‘vulnerability’, ‘harm’ and ‘violence’
    • Explore the way in which families, are constructed by policy and practice in this area, including perspectives from outside the UK
    • Encourage a nuanced view of risk factors and connections between victimisation and perpetrating violence, and between violence and concerns such as substance misuse
    • Address tensions in policy regarding safeguarding, partnership working and supporting families to achieve their own solutions.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the challenges and opportunities in working with families exposed to violence and harm.
    • Discuss and challenge misconceptions and stereotypes in this area with reference to literature and policy.
    • Critically evaluate representations of violence and harm and models of working with families.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of wider cultural issues relating to harm and violence including perspectives from outside the UK.
    • Critique policy and practice examples balancing the needs of adults and children and between protection, rights and self-efficacy.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Digital Story

    Component 2 - 50% Evaluative Commentary 1500 words