September 2022

Drama, Theatre and Applied Performance BA (Hons)

Honours Degree, September 2022

Key Details

  • W400 Course Code
  • 3-4.5* Years
  • 96 Typical UCAS Tariff
Drama play

Ask Us a Question

Clearing 2022

Call our Clearing hotline now to see if we can offer you a place to start this September. 

If on results day you wish to re-consider your choice and want to choose Newman University, you can apply to us over the phone, on LiveChat or through Whatsapp.

You can also join us on Saturday 20th August for an Open Day to look around the facilities and talk with subject and support staff. No need to book, simply turn up.

 

 

Find out more

Entry Requirements

You must achieve at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g. MM at BTEC Diploma; MPP at BTEC Extended Diploma) towards the total tariff.

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9-M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

All applicants will be invited to prepare a short audition piece.

For applicants who are unsure that they will achieve the above UCAS tariff, Newman University offers Drama, Theatre and Applied Performance (with Foundation Year) which enables such applicants to access a university degree via a four year route. Upon successful completion of their foundation year, students will progress to Year 1 of a named degree. Whilst not a condition of entry onto the Foundation Year, students wishing to follow particular named routes with additional entry requirements, will need to meet these requirements before they make the transition from their foundation year to year 1.

International Students
The University is not licensed by the UK Government to sponsor migrant students under the Student route and is therefore unable to accept applications from international students at present.

Applying Direct Option

You can apply direct to Newman University for the full-time route for this course if you have not previously applied to Newman University through UCAS and you are not applying to any other universities.

Simply click on this Direct Application link to do this.

N.B. will need to enter ‘New User’ account details when first accessing this portal.

If you have any questions regarding entry onto this course please contact our friendly and helpful admissions team via our Admissions Enquiry Form

Course Fees

The full-time course fee for September 2022 is £9,250.

The University will review tuition fees and increase fees in line with any inflationary uplift as determined by the UK Government, if permitted by law or government policy, in subsequent years of your course. It is anticipated that such increases would be linked to RPI (the Retail Price Index excluding mortgage interest payments).

Additional Costs

Students will be expected to contribute towards the cost of theatre trips, recent trips have cost £5 each.

Find out more about the other additional costs associated with our undergraduate degrees. 

 

Modules

Please be aware that, as with any course, there may be changes to the modules delivered, for information view our Changes to Programmes of Module Changes page.

*As a part-time undergraduate student, you choose how many modules to study each year (up to a maximum of 6). To qualify for a student tuition fee loan you will need to choose at least 4 modules. A normal 3-year degree will take 4.5 years (if you take 4 modules per year) up to a maximum of 8 years to complete. You will be taught alongside full-time undergraduate students.

Timetables: find out when information is available to students

 

  1. This module will initially focus on selected Naturalist/Realist, Formalist/Epic, and Cruelty/Absurd drama, to introduce students to Modernist drama. It will then introduce students to the challenges of the postmodern, when the notion of performance is no longer constrained by the theatre building. Students read and workshop selected plays and performance practices from the 1890s to the present. Where possible the module will include a field trip to a relevant local production.
  2. This module will introduce students to the basic concepts, terminology, and politics of exploring identity in cultural texts. Through studying excerpts from popular critical commentaries on theories of gender, sexuality, race, disability, and class, students will develop skills in textual and cultural analysis, establishing an introductory critical vocabulary that will be developed and refined in subsequent levels of the programme. Students will acquire knowledge of the history of cultural representations of identities and explore the extent to which these discourses are revisited and redressed in contemporary popular texts (fiction, film, television, music video, drama etc.) The first part of the module focuses on applying accessible critical commentaries on feminism, queer studies, postcolonialism, disability studies, and Marxism to popular cultural case studies. Formative feedback opportunities on writing reviews and annotated bibliographies will be offered as part of the seminar workshop teaching sessions.
  3. Music and Theatre have deep historical connections and this module aims to introduce and explore this diverse symbiotic relationship.  Students will examine the history and practices of a range of performance disciplines, such as Peking Opera, Noh Theatre, Elizabethan Masque, Opera, American Musical Theatre, the film musical, avant garde Music Theatre, and Performance Art.
  4. This module aims to equip students with the knowledge and self-management skills to make informed choices in preparing for work placement and the transition to employment or further study on graduation.  Learners will be provided with the opportunities to develop awareness of the workplace, identify different career and study options, recognise and articulate their own experience, accomplishments and talents and plan and implement career management strategies for the short and long term.
  5. This module will be focused on Applied Drama/Theatre practitioner skills such as, for example, Augusto Boal’s ‘Theatre of the Oppressed’ participatory work and Forum Theatre (FT). You will undertake classroom both theoretical and practical sessions (lectures and workshops) to understand the theoretical perspectives on practice and to develop your skills as an Applied Drama practitioner with understanding of the actor/facilitator role. You will take part in FT games for actors and non-actors, body exercises, group work, and interactive theatre techniques. You will be assessed on a reflection to your learning through the sessions in order to take responsibility for participating, understanding and demonstrating progress of your skills. You will be encouraged to review your development and discuss Applied Drama/Theatre practice.
  6. One of the key features of the Drama programme at Newman is the Production strand. This module will develop students’ ability to use theories acquired regarding acting and directing, technical aspects of signing in theatre, analysing text and developing character. It will involve the production of a play, or part of a play, normally (but not exclusively) in the realist tradition.  The module is practically-based, but also encourages students to be reflective about their own practice. It utilises a range of theatrical methodologies for example those of Stanislavski.  
  1. This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting. This module provides an opportunity for students wishing to attain National Professional recognition with the Teaching and Learning Academy (TLA) to complete an AMTLA project.  
  2. One of the key features of the Drama programme at Newman is the Production strand. This module will develop students’ ability to use theories acquired regarding acting and directing, technical aspects of signing in theatre, analysing text and developing character. It will involve the production of a play, or part of a play, normally (but not exclusively) in the realist tradition.  The module is practically-based, but also encourages students to be reflective about their own practice. It utilises a range of theatrical methodologies for example those of Stanislavski.  
  3. This module will initially focus on selected Naturalist/Realist, Formalist/Epic, and Cruelty/Absurd drama, to introduce students to Modernist drama. It will then introduce students to the challenges of the postmodern, when the notion of performance is no longer constrained by the theatre building. Students read and workshop selected plays and performance practices from the 1890s to the present. Where possible the module will include a field trip to a relevant local production.
  4. This module will introduce students to the basic concepts, terminology, and politics of exploring identity in cultural texts. Through studying excerpts from popular critical commentaries on theories of gender, sexuality, race, disability, and class, students will develop skills in textual and cultural analysis, establishing an introductory critical vocabulary that will be developed and refined in subsequent levels of the programme. Students will acquire knowledge of the history of cultural representations of identities and explore the extent to which these discourses are revisited and redressed in contemporary popular texts (fiction, film, television, music video, drama etc.) The first part of the module focuses on applying accessible critical commentaries on feminism, queer studies, postcolonialism, disability studies, and Marxism to popular cultural case studies. Formative feedback opportunities on writing reviews and annotated bibliographies will be offered as part of the seminar workshop teaching sessions.
  5. Music and Theatre have deep historical connections and this module aims to introduce and explore this diverse symbiotic relationship.  Students will examine the history and practices of a range of performance disciplines, such as Peking Opera, Noh Theatre, Elizabethan Masque, Opera, American Musical Theatre, the film musical, avant garde Music Theatre, and Performance Art.
  1. The dissertation provides an opportunity for a sustained and focused study on a particular area of Drama, Theatre and Applied Performance.  By the end of the module, students should be able to demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of a wide range of concepts, theories and methodologies.  The dissertation must reflect critical reading and independent research.  Wherever possible, and appropriate, the writing should relate theoretical studies to applied methodologies, and/or practice. The written work should establish clear lines of original enquiry in independent research.  Academic conventions are essential – elegant and lucid writing desirable.
  2. In this module students, drawing on their previous experience, will have the opportunity to develop a small-scale theatrical performance that engages with the ideas and practice of relevant theatre practitioners. This may be either a performance of an existing theatrical text or an original piece of work devised by the student.   Performances may take the form of a solo piece but may also involve collaboration with other performers.   Students, whether working on group or solo productions, will take directorial responsibility for all aspects of the production including issues relating to performance and technical, scenographic and administrative requirements. Students will be expected to work independently in the planning, researching and rehearsal processes but will be allocated a member of staff who will supervise the process. Students will be expected to keep documentary evidence of their process, as well as undertaking independent research, which will form the basis of an accompanying reflective logbook
  3. This module offers students the opportunity to build on their level 5 work placement through the more developed application of a negotiated work-based research project. Students will agree with their placement tutor and workplace mentor a brief for a project which addresses a need within the organisation. Learners should complete a minimum of 100 hours in the work place. It is in the spirit of this module that wherever possible, the focus will be on social or community / sustainable development.
  4. This module will focus on developing the students’ understanding of dramatic structure and their experience of the creative process in writing a piece of original theatre.  The teaching sessions will be a combination of the study of key theoretical ideas, dramatic structure, and creative writing linked to playwriting, with the close examination of how different playwrights have structured their work.  There will be a mixture of practical and written work.  Towards the end of the module students will be increasingly encouraged to bring in examples of their own works-in-progress and work on them with the group, for example in rehearsed readings and / or by students directing their own work, with the aim of then redrafting before the final submission.  The assessment is of a script plus a supporting account detailing and analysing the thinking behind the script.
  5. One of the key features of the Drama programme at Newman is the Production strand. This module will develop students’ ability to use theories acquired regarding acting and directing, technical aspects of signing in theatre, analysing text and developing character. It will involve the production of a play, or part of a play, normally (but not exclusively) in the realist tradition.  The module is practically-based, but also encourages students to be reflective about their own practice. It utilises a range of theatrical methodologies for example those of Stanislavski.