January 2021

Education MA

Master's Degree, Postgraduate, January 2021

Doctor of Education

Overview

Course content

Newman offers you the opportunity to enhance your professional knowledge, understanding and skills by developing and implementing systematic professional enquiry and research.

You can also expect to further develop your knowledge, understanding, and skills in curriculum development. The course promotes critical engagement in a range of contemporary issues pertinent to specific interests and needs and you are encouraged to explore your own personal and professional interests and expertise. If you wish to progress your studies even further then the course provides an appropriate academic platform for progression to PhD/EdD study.

Attendance

Modules are based at Newman, usually delivered one evening per week. However, if there are significant numbers of staff in one institution wishing to undertake the programme we can deliver the programme on your site at times convenient to you.

Part-time students (2-3 years route) have a maximum period of study of 5 years to complete an MA. However, an MA is typically completed over 2-3 years and we recommend that part-time students take 60 credits per year (i.e. 2×30 credit modules across the year). Part-time students (1-1.5 years route) have a maximum period of study of 3 years to complete an MA, but typically complete an MA in 18 months to 2 years.

Assessment

You will experience a range of work-based assessment formats including portfolios, presentations, written reports and essays, work-based studies and practical tasks. The course will recognise your needs as a learner and develop independent study skills that are transferable to a range of learning situations and assessment tasks.

Special features

You will have access to all facilities at Newman including the library, which stocks a wide range of books, journals and e-books. Previous level 7 masters credits may be transferred (free-of-charge) through the accreditation of prior certificated learning (APCL). Also, you can gain credits for other sustained CPD programmes you have undertaken, such as National College Programmes, by writing up your reflections against the assessment criteria for a comparable module via the accreditation of prior experiential learning (APEL). You may also gain national professional recognition through the Teaching and Learning Academy for your masters level work.

Postgraduate Loans

For further information regarding a Postgraduate Loan (PGL) for Master’s study click here

Studying and living in Birmingham

Newman University is located in Britain’s second city – Birmingham. With one of the youngest city populations in Europe, it is a vibrant and dynamic place to study.

Studying at Newman University, you have the advantage of being near to the city, but living in, or commuting to peaceful and comfortable surroundings on campus.

Dining out

Birmingham has lots of wonderful places to dine out with a range of different cuisines. Places where you can dine out include; Brindley Place, Mailbox and Hagley Road (just 10 minutes’ from Newman).

Entertainment

Whether you like to go to; the theatre, gigs or clubs, or enjoy: sports, shopping visiting art galleries or exhibitions – Birmingham will not disappoint and you will be spoilt for choice!

Location

Getting around Birmingham is easy via train, bus or by car. Birmingham has excellent transport links to the rest of Britain, making it easy for those weekend getaways!

Why not explore the city for yourself by visiting one of our Open Days?

Want to find out more about Birmingham? Then take a look at some Birmingham City Secrets.

Ask Us A Question

Autumn Open Days

Join us at one of our virtual open days this autumn, where you can find out more about our courses and talk to academic staff and current students.

Book Now

Contact Details

Entry Requirements

An Honours degree in a relevant subject area from a UK university or an overseas university agreed by NARIC as equivalent and subject to ILET and EU requirements. Consideration will be given to students with lower level qualifications who have a relevant range of professional experience. Professional experience that equates to degree level will be considered by the Course Co-ordinator. If some non-graduates are to be considered pre entry tasks will be considered and used at the co-ordinator’s discretion.

Students may also enter with up to 90 level 7 credits via the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL). The MA Education is open to graduates who are professionally engaged in an educational setting and/or graduates who have an interest in educational issues.

Course Fees

2020/21 and 2021/22*

Home/EU students: Part time; £1,000 per 30 credit module

*Fees shown are for 2020/21 and 2021/22 academic years. The University will review tuition fees and increase fees in line with any inflationary uplift as determined by the UK Government, if permitted by law or government policy, in subsequent years of your course. It is anticipated that such increases would be linked to RPI (the Retail Price Index excluding mortgage interest payments).
N.B. A minimum of 180 credits are required to complete the MA Education.

 

Postgraduate Loans

You can apply for a postgraduate loan of up to £11,222, when enrolling on a full Master’s degree (180 credits), to use as a contribution to the cost of studying and living expenses.

For further information visit the postgraduate loans website.

Additional Information
General Academic Regulations: Terms and Conditions for students attending our courses
Timetables: find out when information is available to students

Course Modules
Please refer to the shortest iteration of the programme for full module details.
Optional Modules: find out how the University deals with changes that may occur in some eventualities
Module Titles and Named Required Modules to Obtain Named Routes

Many modules will continue to be rooted in enhancing professional practice within work-based learning. All assessment will be carried out through the medium of English and there will be no exceptions. However, students will also be able to undertake non-empirical research – see * in the PDF table above for modules which will facilitate non-empirical research.

Modules

Please be aware that, as with any course, there may be changes to the modules delivered, for information view our Changes to Programmes of Module Changes page.

Timetables: find out when information is available to students

  1. This module will provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate a critical understanding of the principles underpinning effective research designs in education and the social sciences at master’s level. Beginning with a reflective approach to their own ontological and epistemological positioning in relation to both their research design and established research paradigms, students will explore issues of research methodology, ethics and understanding in relation to a chosen field, to enhance and inform professional and/ or academic practice. Students will relate their chosen issue critically to current literature and need to critically analyse the validity, reliability and appropriateness of their research processes. Students will design a research project, which will include a framework for the collection and analysis/interpretation of primary data.
  2. The focus of this module is to explore aspects of the Student’s professional practice and individual needs. Students will be encouraged to critically reflect on an appropriate area of their professional practice, after identifying their professional and academic learning needs and in negotiation with their tutor. Students will also be introduced to Appreciative Inquiry as a potential organizational development method to support reflective practice.
  3. The International Education module will provide students with the opportunity to develop a systematic understanding of comparative and international education (CIE). The module will explore theoretical strands that have characterised the interdisciplinary field of comparative and international education and explore research on the role and influence of international league tables; the nature and impact of globally influential policy agendas; differing conceptions of pedagogy; accountability and the quality of education; relationships between educational success, culture and identity and the implications of the internationalisation of higher education. The module will investigate the value of knowledge and understanding of comparative educational ideologies, systems and practices, and consider the potential impact of this knowledge and understanding on local professional practice. Students will be encouraged to use self-direction and originality in the investigation of education in chosen international contexts. The module will provide students with opportunities to explore and critically analyse comparative international educational policy and practice, and to disseminate knowledge and understanding to colleagues and/ or peers. Students will be encouraged to stimulate and support collaborative learning culture among colleagues and other students.
  4. The focus of this module is to offer students the opportunity to explore the basic definitions of coaching and mentoring within an educational setting. Students will critically reflect on and evaluate the impact of some of the approaches to coaching and mentoring have on the workforce in their own work setting. Students will be expected to reflect on their personal experiences and develop their critical stance which is underpinned by a theoretical debate. The module will assist teachers and others working in schools in the task of providing professional development on various levels.
  5. The focus of this module is to offer students the opportunity to compare definitions of coaching and mentoring within an educational setting. Students will show evidence of developing their critical reflection on professional practice and the impact of educational theory and research on professional development. Students will be expected to demonstrate in their assignment, evidence of skills development in relation to educational research and professional development. This module will guide students to reflect, consolidate and enhance their coaching and mentoring skills further. Students will be expected to offer critical reflection on their personal experiences and develop their critical stance which is underpinned by a theoretical debate. The module requires students to reflect critically on theory and practice from an ethical and professional standpoint, explore the implications for professional practice, and ultimately provide opportunities for applied learning and continuous professional development.
  6. The focus of this module is to explore approaches to leadership and management, and the skills and qualities required to lead and manage a range of individual and professional groups within an educational setting. Current research, statutory requirements, legislation and policy will be drawn from in relation to leadership and management. Students will critically reflect on and evaluate the impact of different approaches to leadership and management, and models of leadership. Students will also be introduced to Appreciative Inquiry as a potential organizational development method to support leadership and management practice.
  7. This module examines the key characteristics of change management in educational settings. It considers those factors that affect change at the micro, mezzo and macro level of organisational endeavour, including personal, inter-personal organisational and strategic concerns. The module is underpinned by an analysis of common concepts in the evaluation of change management, including: complexity, capacity building, professional capital, professional learning communities, renewal, sustainability, leadership, and enquiry.
  8. This module encourages Students to make use of specialist information, texts, research and/ or practice relating to learning, teaching and assessment, and to critically analyse and reflect on theory in relation to their own practice and context.
  9. The thematic and analytical focus of this module is the impact of the digital media and new information and communication technologies upon culture, notions of identity and education / learning. Students will explore how new technologies, particularly web 2.0 tools, have impacted on learning and teaching, and how comfortably digital media sits within education. Students will be introduced to the perspective that the spread of the new IC technologies is the source of some profound cultural changes that have massive implications for both socialisation and educational processes. Students will also be expected to demonstrate that they can use the new technologies in their own creative educative production, in critiquing their use in the learning and teaching process.
  10. This module seeks to develop students understanding of the context in which safeguarding takes place and links this to debates around the appropriateness and effectiveness of policy and practice. In doing this, students will explore concepts of vulnerability and risk and how they affect working practices as well as critically evaluating the current policy context.
  11. This module seeks to develop student understandings of the historical, philosophical, sociological, legal and political perspectives surrounding vulnerable adults, youth and children. It will include an overview and critique of dominant perspectives both domestically and internationally, around Voices, Rights and Representations and use this as a basis for the evaluation of policy and practice issues.
  12. This module provides an introduction to the issues and practicalities of supporting student learning in Higher Education.  It will examine the purposes of Higher Education, relevant adult learning theories and encourage students to critically reflect on how these interact with their values to shape their HE teaching practices.  The practices explored will include session design, support for informal learning, assessment and feedback, evaluation and enhancement of own teaching practice.  As such the module addresses the UK professional Standards Framework (UKPSF) for teaching and supporting learning in HE at descriptor 1. N.B: EDM740 can be taken as short course, stand-alone module, that leads to the award of an Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA).  
  13. This module provides an introduction to higher education practice; seeking to relate, professional expertise, subject knowledge, research and scholarship to course design.  It encourages students to critically reflect on their own professional identity(ies) as academic, practitioner and HE teacher. This is then related to in-depth examination of values-based curriculum design and the scholarship of teaching in HE.  The module addresses descriptor 2 of the UKPSF.
  14. The focus of this module is to explore approaches to educational leadership in Catholic school settings, and the skills and qualities required to lead a range of individual and professional groups within this setting. Current research and policy will be drawn from in relation to leadership within Catholic schools. Students will critically reflect on and evaluate the impact of different approaches to leadership and models of leadership, considering spiritual and ethical leadership in particular. The module will assist teachers and others working in church schools in the task of integrating Christian principles and concepts into their professional responsibilities as leaders.
  15. The module offers students the opportunity to develop their knowledge and understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of change management within Catholic school settings. There will be a focus on developing professional relationships, networks and learning contexts which establish an environment in which change can happen and becomes part of the sustainability of Catholic schools.
  16. This module enables students to reflect on research on professional practice by analysing and reviewing different forms of research on professional enquiry. Students are also encouraged to relate research to their professional experiences and current roles. Experience provides the context for the development of professional enquiry and this, in turn, enables critical reflection and analysis related to working contexts and areas of interest. During the module students develop a rationale for a small-scale research project with reference to a particular area of interest as a basis for the following modules on Research Design and as preparation for their Dissertation.
  17. This module offers students the opportunity to explore the concepts of inclusion and special educational needs and disability and to critically engage with the debates surrounding the inclusion ‘agenda.’ They will gain a critical understanding of how SEND can affect pupils’ participation and learning and can cause barriers to learning that can lead to underachievement. They will explore strategies to promote a whole school culture of high expectations and best practice in teaching and learning to improve outcomes for children and young people with SEND.
  18. This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to appreciate and develop the personal and professional qualities and leadership skills they need to promote inclusive practice and support the interests and needs of children, young people and pupils with SEND and disabilities. Students will be encouraged to critically reflect on the role of the SENCO and to critically evaluate their practice in the aspects of multi-agency working, meeting statutory responsibilities and deploying resources and systems to improve outcomes for pupils with a range of SEND and their families.
  19. This level 7 module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to achieve the National Award for Special Educational Needs Coordination. Students will be expected to evidence all the learning outcomes for the National Award by completing an electronic portfolio. The evidence will be drawn from school based activities, policies, procedures and systems that SENCOs have put in place, used, developed or reviewed. The evidence will be accompanied by a series of critical reflections on the student’s professional practice informed by recent research and reading.
  20. The focus of this module is to explore international approaches to educational alternatives in the manner of democratic and autonomous education. How these styles, philosophies and forms of education work in practical and theoretical terms will be covered. How they relate to mainstream education with regard to policy, practices, the law and politics will also be discussed. Current research and policy about alternative education will be drawn from and what exactly we might mean by the word ‘alternative’ considered, through an interdisciplinary lens. Pupil referral units and other mainstream alternative provision will be looked at but the core focus is on the wide variety – the world of - schools and pathways such as Summerhill School, Sudbury Valley schooling, Steiner, home education and the many other alternatives around the world available and thriving. We will consider, in part, the history of alternative education and the technological and political future. The module will assist teachers and others working in any kind of school or education in the task of integrating open principles and concepts of freedom for children into their professional responsibilities as pedagogues.
  21. The Dissertation module provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate a systematic understanding of research, and a critical awareness of current problems in professional practices, by designing and undertaking a small-scale research study.  Following ethical approval and justification of research methodology and methods, students will normally collect, analyse and interpret primary data and reflect on the ethical implications of their research. However, alternatively, students may develop a. systematic understanding of knowledge by undertaking a non-empirical study in consultation with their supervisor.
  22. This module is designed to consider the historical and contemporary landscape of Pastoral Welfare and Care in the UK and other international contexts. In particular, it will focus on the ways in which pastoral welfare and care has been shaped by the changing needs of children and young people in a range of education and school settings. The module will include a critical discussion of emerging and dominant perspectives that affect the lives of children and young people and critical evaluation of the practices and interventions that have been offered in response.
  23. This module is intended to give practitioner-students insight into the key characteristics of effective leadership and management in the domain of pastoral welfare and care in education. The module considers common and defining features of pastoral practices and the pastoral curriculum in relation to research and best practice in leadership and change management in educational settings. The module explores conceptions of pastoral pedagogy and the how leadership of pastoral welfare and care can be effectively implemented, sustained and dispersed in a diversity of educational settings. Ultimately, the module aims to support participants in undertaking and evaluating leadership of pastoral welfare and care at a range levels in educational organisations.
  24. This module encourages students to make use of specialist information, texts, research and/ or practice to substantiate arguments relating to the chosen issue and to critically analyse and reflect on theory within the area.
  25. This module encourages students to make use of specialist information, texts, research and/ or practice to substantiate arguments relating to the chosen issue and to critically analyse and reflect on theory within the area.
  26. The module encourages Students to make use of specialist information, texts, research and/ or practice to substantiate arguments and to critically analyse and reflect on theory within the chosen area. Students will also demonstrate an appropriate understanding of professional research and ethical issues. Students will undertake a self-directed study within the chosen specialist area and be encouraged to engage in professional discussion and collaborative dissemination of information. Following gaining ethical approval, students will undertake a small-scale, research project, which will normally include the collection and analysis of primary data. However, students may undertake a non-empirical study in close consultation with their tutor.
  27. The module encourages Students to make use of specialist information, texts, research and/ or practice to substantiate arguments and to critically analyse and reflect on theory within the chosen area. Students will also demonstrate an appropriate understanding of professional research and ethical issues. Students will undertake self-directed study within the chosen specialist area and be encouraged to engage in professional discussion and collaborative dissemination of information.
  28. This module aims to allow students to focus on the child development subject area in greater depth than they encountered in their previous courses or experiences. It will enable students to become more specialised in child development and allow them to apply their knowledge in practice. This module will allow students to advance their skills in observation and assessment of child development, supporting their planning of children’s next steps. Students will be encouraged to use the Statutory Framework (EYFS, DfE 2017) in a critical way.  Although the module will cover areas of development such as Language, Cognition, Physical and Personal, Social and Emotional, a holistic approach will be prominent throughout. The importance of safeguarding, particularly around safeguarding babies and young children will also be included within the module. Theories and current research around child development will be critically explored and applied to practical situations.
  29. This module will enable students to develop a critical understanding of children’s learning and development in relation to the role of the pedagogue. It will facilitate a critical awareness and understanding of what promotes effective practice and pedagogy in early childhood, making links to international comparisons as well as focusing on the role of leadership in developing practice. This module will also include reference to theory, research and, where appropriate, practice. There will be opportunities to examine current thinking and research in early childhood, encouraging students to analyse and critically evaluate links between personal principles, early childhood theory, and where appropriate, their developing practice.  Students will embark on a process of critical analysis and evaluation to enhance the quality of provision for young children and their families.

We use cookies to track visits to our website and to deliver targeted messages about the University to users. We do not store personal details. For more information or to change your cookie settings, see our Cookie Policy more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close