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English and Creative Writing BA (Hons)

Honours Degree , Full-time

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Key Details

  • 3 Years
  • 96 Typical UCAS Tariff
  • 1Q29 Course Code
  • Full Time
student shannen writing smiling at friend

Overview

The BA (Hons) English and Creative Writing degree allows you to pursue your passion for reading and interpreting literature whilst also exploring the art of creative writing practice itself. This holistic approach to literature looks at the literary process from both perspectives, the reader and the writer. This will enable you to gain a deep understanding of the dialogue between creative practitioners and their audiences. This is the perfect course for those who want to hone the craft of writing and produce their own work, while also developing the skills of interpretation specific to literary criticism.

Why study this course?

  • Small, supportive creative writing workshop structure for learning and teaching
  • Superb digital resources and innovative use of e-learning facilities to also allow for virtual workshops
  • links with local literary organisations such as Writing West Midlands and Birmingham Literature Festival
  • Dedicated support for exploring careers in creative writing
  • Opportunities to meet published writers in classroom sessions and extra-curricular events

What does the course cover?

During your first year of study you will work on creative writing, language and literature modules, introducing you to a broad range of texts and topics to build your skills and confidence. You will study time and space in literature, think about how identities are shaped by textual and cultural representation, learning about ‘reading’ film, and consider how the classics of literature have been rewritten from alternative perspectives.

In the second year you will undertake a work placement of your choice, which may be in a subject-specific area such as archives, libraries, marketing or museums, or you may want to diversify into other professions such as teaching, law or management. You will work on developing your craft as a writer in dedicated creative writing modules on prose and poetry, and writing and location. You will also have the opportunity to study modules of your choice, including Victorian Literature on Screen, specialist language modules, and Short Fiction.

In the final year you will do a dissertation on a literary or creative writing topic of your choice, and have the opportunity to study specialist modules in diverse areas such as gender and sexuality in literature, postcolonial literature, the contemporary literary scene, language, media and the internet, neo-Victorianism, and American literature and film. Throughout the Creative Writing modules you will develop your creativity in a range of fictional and non-fictional writing. Your versatility as a writer will be nurtured in a supportive environment, attending events with published writers to gain experience, advice, and confidence in your own work. In addition, English Language modules have been designed to enable you to analyse the ways in which meanings are created in a range of texts. This linguistic component to the degree provides you with key analytical skills as well as enhancing both your study of literature and your own creative writing.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment is largely through coursework and takes a variety of forms, including portfolios, presentations, journals and essays. Coursework assignments allow you to focus on areas that are of particular interest to you.

What careers could I consider?

The study of English and Creative Writing develops not only written skills but also critical and creative faculties, which are all highly valued by employers in a range of work situations. Typical careers for graduates include public relations, writing, arts administration and media careers such as journalism, and professions such as law, teaching and management.

Places available this September.

Call 0121 476 1181 to speak to our admissions team and secure your place today.

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Contact Details

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Entry Requirements

September 2019 Entry Requirements

You must achieve at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma; MPP at BTEC Extended Diploma) towards the total tariff.

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9-M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

An A level (or equivalent) in a humanities/social sciences related subject and 5 GCSEs at grade 4/C or above including English at 5/C or above, (or recognised equivalents) are also required.

Applicants may be called for interview.

For applicants who are unsure that they will achieve the above UCAS tariff, Newman University offers English and Creative Writing (with Foundation Year) which enables such applicants to access a university degree via a four year route. Upon successful completion of their foundation year, students will progress to Year 1 of a named degree. Whilst not a condition of entry onto the Foundation Year, students wishing to follow particular named routes with additional entry requirements, will need to meet these requirements before they make the transition from their foundation year to year 1.

Course Fees

Fees per academic year:
Full-time Home/EU students: £9,250 *

* Fees shown are for 2019/20 academic year. The University will review tuition fees and increase fees in line with any inflationary uplift as determined by the UK Government, if permitted by law or government policy, in subsequent years of your course. It is anticipated that such increases would be linked to RPI (the Retail Price Index excluding mortgage interest payments).

Additional Costs

A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is not required for entry into this programme, although it is in many cases required by employers before students can begin their Year 2 (level 5) work placement.  Find out more about completing the DBS application form and the related additional costs.

ENU505 (The Literary Scene) and ENU615 (The Literary Scene).  If you choose to study either one of these modules you will be expected to attend events run as part of the Birmingham Literature Festival (as well as other festivals and events).  Students will incur costs such as travel and possibly an entrance fee.  Please note the modules are optional modules and may not run every year.

Cost: depends on the event you attend. Students had previously been reimbursed £10 (based on 2017/18)

 

Additional Information

General Academic Regulations: Terms and Conditions for students attending our courses

Optional Modules: find out how the University deals with changes that may occur in some eventualities

Timetables: find out when information is available to students

  1. READING FILM
    (Compulsory) enu406
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will introduce critical skills in reading visual texts, undertaking formal and stylistic interpretations, and beginning to make social and theoretical analyses of films. It will develop skills in interpreting visual texts and applications of theories of cultural identity in ENU419. In the first part of the module, students are introduced to rudimentary concepts related to narrative theory, in order to think about the similarities between film and prose narrative in relation to narrative structure, narrative perspective and point of view but also the different ways in which these are controlled and directed in film. This will entail work on the ‘grammar’ and vocabulary of film, the Hollywood continuity system and how it organises space and time through the elements of mise-en-scene:  iconography, camera framing, editing and sound. Students will focus on the close analysis of one Hollywood film, for example Twilight, and then learn how to compose their own film script, using the Hollywood model. In the second part of the module, students are encouraged to see textual analysis as part of a wider consideration of cultural history. They will consider how cinema can be self-reflexive, often working to deconstruct the rigid ideological structures of the Hollywood continuity system in order to reflect on the power of this system to create ideological messages. They will focus on how one counter-cultural film with an alternative ideology, shaped through different conditions of production, can draw upon different traditions and aesthetics to promote attention to gender, ethnic and cultural identities generally unrecognised in Hollywood blockbusters.  One indicative film is Daughters of the Dust, which highlights the role and importance of women and African American women. Students will be assessed by a portfolio, which will comprise of a film review/analysis of a film, and a film script with an accompanying commentary. Workshops dedicated to analysing the stories, practicing scriptwriting, and working on a 300-word formative assignment piece will be built into the module and also tutorial feedback on the formative draft.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Offer a basic knowledge of the distinctive characteristics of film in relation to narrative fiction;

    • Provide an introductory knowledge of the complexities inherent in textual production

    • Help students gain an introductory knowledge and understanding of the distinctive visual characteristics of different film genres

    • Help students' gain an introductory knowledge and understanding of the contexts (historical, cultural geographical, economic, political and social) which can determine the form and interpretation of films and the ideological implications of these contexts for constructing social identities

    • Help students start to develop critical skills in the close reading and analysis of film discourses and capacity for independent thought and judgment in critical practice

    • Develop students' knowledge, understanding and ability to begin to critically evaluate the basics of some theoretical approaches to texts, including narrative and structural theory, semiotics, deconstruction, ideology, feminist and postcolonial theory.

    • Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of some secondary critical material and resources

    • Introduce students to appropriate literary and filmic critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation.

    • get students to start to identify contexts of textual production and think about the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts and language.

    • Start to develop students’ abilities to write to a specific brief and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Gain an introductory knowledge of film and how the film medium differs from written fictional narratives, in relation to the distinctive audio and visual conventions through which meanings and representations are constructed.

    • Gain a basic knowledge of the historical, geographical, cultural, economic and social contexts of the production of some films and how these contexts can determine the form and interpretation of films and the ideological implications of these contexts for constructing social identities

    • Gain a basic knowledge and understanding of narrative and cultural theory in relation to short stories and film productions

    • Apply critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of films and short stories

    • Develop a basic ability to use critical and analytical terminology appropriate to the discussion of film and appropriate scholarly citation

    • Gain some knowledge and understanding of generic conventions and the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts

    • Gain some experience of creative practice primarily as a means to critical reflection

    • Demonstrate literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;

    • Develop their research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material, at an introductory level;

    • Begin to develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning.

     

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (3500 words)

  2. THE LIFE OF THE WRITER
    (Compulsory) enu410
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This foundational module introduces you to key elements of the writing process, from drafting and planning using a writer's journal, to building the confidence to share writing with your peers in a friendly and supportive workshop environment, and subsequent stages of revising and editing. Seminars introduce you to valuable processes of reading as a writer, while workshops supply opportunities for regular formative feedback on your writing. As well as supporting you through your development of key creative writing skills, this module also encourages you to consider your rationale for writing, whether personal, political, or both, and helps you to position yourself as part of a writing community. The holistic approach to creative writing that this module adopts aims to build individual confidence and nurture creativity as well as encouraging you to consider the wider impact of your writing. Guest writers and lecturers also allow access to a range of specialisms and voices.

     

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Develop students' ability to plan and research their writing using a writer's journal;

    • Develop students' ability to reflect on their own writing and that of others in a workshop environment;

    • Develop student's ability to draft and edit their writing as a result of workshop feedback;

    • Develop students' ability to reflect on their writing practice;

    • Develop students' capacity for independent thought and originality and authenticity in writing;

    • Familiarise students with a range of literature from different historical periods and cultures relating to the module's themes;

    • Develop students’ ability to respond to such literature both creatively and critically;

    • Familiarise students with the wider writing community;

    • Support students in the development of their own writing

     

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Demonstrate the ability to engage productively in the various stages of the writing process;
    • Demonstrate an ability to reflect constructively on their own development as writers;
    • Develop the capacity for independent thought as linked to the authenticity, originality and inventiveness of their writing, and the ability to take calculated and contextualised risks in the pursuit of this aim;
    • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in particular contexts and create work that is coherently and appropriately structured;
    • Demonstrate awareness of the distinctive literary and linguistic characteristics of genres and the ability to employ these in their writing;
    • Demonstrate an awareness of the different contexts (historical/ cultural/ geographical/ economic/ political/ social) which can influence the form and interpretation of texts;
    • Develop knowledge of the wider writing community;
    • Collaborate productively with others in workshops.

     

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Writing Portfolio (3000 words)

  3. TIME AND SPACE
    (Compulsory) enu415
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module will consider how time and space operate in literary texts. It takes New Criticism as its starting point: a critical method that insisted on divorcing literary texts from their temporal and spatial contexts. Students will explore the necessity of placing texts within their contexts of production, so that they can understand them within a critical and ethical framework. They will learn how structuralist critics explained narrative time and the spaces created by point of view and dialogue, and be able to recognise how the organization of time and space in literature either enacts or undermines realism. As this is one of the fundamental modules, skills based work will consider the time and space required for academic study using the ‘behavioural’ aspects of Helen Sword’s BASE model. Exercises in class will ask students to evaluate how effective their habits of study are, and to reflect on different strategies they might need to employ at this level of academic work: how will they use time and place to ensure they have the space to be successful? There will be a strong element of self- and peer-review in these parts of the module. Formative feedback will be given by students and the tutor in workshops. The students will have an opportunity to get written feedback from the tutor on one element of their portfolio before submission; this element of the portfolio will also be subject to peer assessment. The portfolio will provide formative feedback for the essay element of assessment.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 48.00 Independent   : 152.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • introduce students to a range of literary texts thematically linked by ideas of time and space;

    • develop students’ understanding of New Critical methods and Structuralist theory and how this can be used in the exploration of a variety of texts;

    • allow students to explore the connections between time and space in literature and literary realism;

    • show students how knowledge of the contexts (historical, cultural geographical, economic, political and social) of texts’ production link to the ethical responsibilities of textual interpretation and language use;

    • develop students’ critical skills in the close reading and analysis of texts and discourses;

    • introduce critical and analytical terminology relating to structuralism;

    • teach students how to write to a specific brief and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing;

    • advance students’ literacy and communication skills in written work focusing on producing work that is coherently structured around an argument;

    • develop students’ research skills in use, interpretation and synthesis of secondary  material;

    • facilitate students’: reflection on their ability to act independently, manage own time, plan and organise workload to meet deadlines; evaluation of these skills ; and development of a range of alternative strategies.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • read and discuss a range of literary texts thematically linked by ideas of time and space;

    • learn about and apply New Critical methods and Structuralist theory to understand and how this can be used in the exploration of a variety of texts;

    • explore the connections between time and space in literature and literary realism;

    • apply the contexts (historical, cultural geographical, economic, political and social) of texts’ production to their interpretations, linking this to the ethical responsibilities of textual interpretation and language use;

    • develop their critical skills in the close reading and analysis of texts and discourses;

    • learn and use critical and analytical terminology relating to structuralism;

    • learn how to write to a specific brief and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing;

    • advance their literacy and communication skills in written work focusing on producing work that is coherently structured around an argument;

    • develop their research skills in use, interpretation and synthesis of secondary material;

    • reflect on their ability to act independently, manage own time, plan and organise workload to meet deadlines; evaluate their skills; and develop of a range of alternative strategies.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Portfolio (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Essay (1500 words)

  4. CHALLENGING THE CANON
    (Compulsory) enu416
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module introduces students to the notion of canonical literature and then considers the ways in which contemporary authors have ‘written back’ to specific canonical works and to what effect. The first teaching weeks will introduce students to the notion of the literary canon, its usefulness, limitations, relativity and Western bias. Students will study a pair of exemplar texts – a canonical novel (hypotext) alongside a ‘transformative text’ (hypertext) – and through these consider questions of literary form, genre, value, authorship as well as relevant shifts in critical movements, such as structuralism to poststructuralism. In the second half of the module, students will choose their own textual pairing for a group presentation project in which they will be asked to examine similar questions through their own research and analysis. The module aims to develop students’ ability to study independently and reduce their reliance on transmission models of learning. This will include researching around a topic, working collaboratively with peers, developing their self-efficacy by promoting their capabilities to approach tasks as challenges to be mastered, and understanding ‘setbacks’ as opportunities to target set. Formative feedback will be built into in-class workshops and delivered through regular project group tutorials.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 76.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Start to help students to think critically about how literature is categorised, evaluated and valued in changing historical and socio-political contexts

    • Develop students’ analytical and criticality skills through the comparison of related literary works

    • Introduce students to relevant selected critical concepts and their applications

    • Develop independent research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate, interpret and synthesise complex information from diverse sources

    • Develop skills for collaborative learning and working

    • Enable students to start to identify the attributes, skills and approaches developed through study in the Humanities and valued by employers

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Group Presentation & Written Evaluation (5 minutes per student, plus 750 words)

  5. MAKING SENSE OF LANGUAGE
    (Compulsory) enu418
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module covers theories and methods for doing discourse analysis of written and spoken texts. The historical circumstances of different theories and methods as well as key empirical studies employing them will be covered, with an emphasis on understanding how different text types and circumstances require different methods. The module will focus on contemporary methods of data collection and linguistic analysis, which may include corpus linguistics, conversation analysis, cohesion analysis, speech act theory, positioning theory, and/or narrative analysis, as examples. Student will learn to critically evaluate the particular strengths and weaknesses of each method and how to best match data collection methods and forms of analysis. Students will develop an appreciation for the different approaches to analysis of different text types, and engage in their own small-scale studies of written and/or spoken texts. Students will receive regular formative feedback on group and individual work throughout the module.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Help students gain a detailed knowledge of the field of discourse analysis, with an appreciation for the different approaches to discourse applied by scholars in different areas of linguistics;

    • Develop students' knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically a range of theoretical approaches to discourse analysis and how they influence fields of language study, such as Corpus Linguistics and Conversation Analysis.

    • Help students' gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of how linguists investigate the meanings of texts and talk in particular historical, cultural and social contexts;

    • Develop students' ability to think critically about language and to write about it in ways that are structured, reflective and analytical;

    • Evaluate systematically and critically the distinctions among different text types;

    • Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of resources including linguistic texts and journal articles;

    • Ensure students have a clear, comprehensive declarative knowledge of discourse analysis, equipping them to do their own analyses.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Develop their knowledge and understanding of how linguistics is used to describe and analyse the social world;

    • Gain a knowledge and understanding of a range of theoretical approaches to language analysis and how these theories affect methodology;

    • Gain a detailed knowledge of a range of approaches to discourse analysis, as well as the appropriacy of different approaches in different settings;

    • Apply a range of critical approaches to language analysis, with a focus on students’ own interests;

    • Develop their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation of work in discourse analysis, while appreciating the complexities with which the term ‘discourse analysis’ is used in different settings;

    • Produce their own small-scale analysis of discourse, with a focus on the applying their chosen method in a reliable, valid, and systematic way;

    • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;

    • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy in terms of their own analysis, by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performance;

    • To collaborate productively with others in research, negotiation, problem solving, writing, and presentation skills to an advanced level;

    • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Essay (3500 words)

  6. READING IDENTITY POLITICS
    (Compulsory) enu419
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module will introduce students to the basic concepts, terminology, and politics of exploring identity in cultural texts. Through studying excerpts from popular critical commentaries on theories of gender, sexuality, race, disability, and class, students will develop skills in textual and cultural analysis, establishing an introductory critical vocabulary that will be developed and refined in subsequent levels of the programme. Students will acquire knowledge of the history of cultural representations of identities and explore the extent to which these discourses are revisited and redressed in contemporary popular texts (fiction, film, television, music video, drama etc.) The first part of the module focuses on applying accessible critical commentaries on feminism, queer studies, postcolonialism, disability studies, and Marxism to popular cultural case studies. The second part of the module introduces students to an early modern play in preparation for a theatre trip to the RSC to see the play in performance. Students are then assessed via a portfolio including a critical review of the production and a supporting annotated bibliography on an identity-themed topic. Formative feedback opportunities on writing reviews and annotated bibliographies will be offered as part of the seminar workshop teaching sessions.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 44.00 Independent   : 156.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Introduce students to a range of contemporary critical texts about cultural representation and identity politics, and a case study of a contemporary performance of an early modern play

    • Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the ideological and ethical issues in the representation of identities in contemporary culture

    • Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of a range of contexts (historical, social, economic, political) for exploring the construction of identities in text and culture

    • Enable students to develop the ability to write coherently and in a structured way about cultural identity politics, recognising and commenting ethically on key features of identity construction in cultural texts

    • Develop students’ ability to use secondary critical resources in both digital and hard copy form to help them develop their understanding of key theoretical perspectives in relation to identity

    • To help students develop effective habits of independent study, taking responsibility for their own learning and their own perspectives on identities in culture, through carefully structured and supported activities.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Gain an introductory knowledge of a range of critical/theoretical texts in relation to contemporary identity politics

    • Gain a basic knowledge of the historical, cultural, political, economic, and social contexts in which these texts – and an early modern play – are produced

    • Gain an introductory knowledge of the ways in which theory/criticism can be applied to textual/cultural examples of identity construction

    • Develop their critical skills in close reading and analysis of texts

    • Develop their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation

    • Gain some knowledge and understanding of the role and responsibility of authors and readers in making meanings from cultural representations

    • Demonstrate literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured and appropriate to the assignment brief

    • Develop their research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material

    • Develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performance

    • Provide opportunities to practice the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required by employers.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (3500 words)

  1. WRITING AND LOCATION
    (Compulsory) enu507
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This innovative module focuses on site-specific creative writing. Students are encouraged to respond to locations in a variety of creative modes and genres. Modes of writing explored may include note-taking in a specific location, walking as creative practice, writing as environmental activism, and writing as installation. Students are introduced to interdisciplinary ways of working, intersecting with visual arts practice (writing installations) and ecology (writing as environmental activism). Students also have the opportunity to explore the genres of nature writing and poetry. This module also aims to build skills in the autonomous methods of working required by the creative writer and wide independent reading is encouraged as well as a focused approach to immersive writing activities. Seminars employ the valuable processes of reading as a writer, while workshops supply opportunities for formative feedback on writing. Guest writers and lecturers also allow access to a range of specialisms and voices.

     

    Note: this module can be taken by students who choose to spend some of their time studying their subject abroad.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Further develop students’ knowledge and understanding of a range of creative genres;
    • Develop students’ abilities to produce creative texts in response to particular contexts and to promote an understanding of the relationship between creative writing and other disciplines such as art and ecology;
    • Further develop students’ experience and understanding of the various stages of the writing process with a particular focus on: the importance of the writer’s journal as a repository for ‘on the spot’ observations and notes; collaboration with others through workshops; and editing work as a result of feedback;
    • Develop students’ awareness of the wider writing community and of career opportunities afforded by site-specific or community-based writing projects and residencies.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Demonstrate engagement in various stages of the writing process; including the gathering of ideas in a writer’s journal in response to their surroundings;
    • Develop the capacity for independent thought as linked to the authenticity, originality and inventiveness of their writing, and the ability to take calculated and contextualised risks in the pursuit of this aim;
    • Demonstrate awareness of the distinctive literary and linguistic characteristics of genres and the ability to employ these in their writing;
    • Demonstrate a developing ability to employ various structural and stylistic effects in their own writing, matching aspects of form and content to factors such as genre and context;
    • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in specific contexts and create work that is coherently structured;
    • Demonstrate an awareness of the different contexts (historical/ cultural/ geographical/ economic/ political/ social) which can influence the form and interpretation of texts;
    • Demonstrate an awareness of the wider writing community and of career opportunities afforded by site-specific or community-based writing projects and residencies;
    • Act independently, manage own time, and plan and organise projects to meet specified targets.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Writing Portfolio (4000 words)

  2. SHORT FICTION
    (Compulsory) enu508
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    On this module, students will examine a substantial range of short fiction as well as key approaches to studying the form. Students will read stories from the nineteenth century to the present, and novellas to flash/micro fictional forms. Students will consider the short story in terms of: genre; form and structure; cycles/sequences; critical contexts; social and historical contexts. There will be an emphasis on how short fiction is collected and arranged in anthologies to support the assignment. There will be opportunities for formative feedback through in-class writing tasks.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Introduce students to a substantial range of short fiction texts from the nineteenth century to the present, and from novellas to flash/micro fictions

    • Enable the development of a detailed knowledge and understanding of the distinctive formal characteristics of the genre

    • Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of a range of theoretical approaches to short fiction

    • Enable students to practice the application of critical approaches in their analyses of short fiction

    • Develop students’ understanding of the contexts (historical, cultural geographical, economic, political and social) which can determine the form and interpretation of texts and language, and the ideological implications of these contexts

    • Enable students to collate a coherent collection of short fiction and effectively introduce the collection using their knowledge of the genre, relevant research, and analytical skills.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of a range of short fiction texts, the genre’s formal characteristics, and specific theoretical approaches to short fiction

    • Practice developing theoretically informed readings of literature

    • Demonstrate an understanding of some of the contexts (historical, cultural geographical, economic, political and social) which can determine the form and interpretation of texts and language, and the ideological implications of these contexts

    • Collate a coherent collection of short fiction and effectively introduce the collection using their knowledge of the genre, relevant research, and analytical skills

    • Demonstrate that they can write to a specific brief and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing

    • Identify career opportunities and reflect on the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Critical Introduction to an Anthology of Short Fiction (4000 words)

  3. THE PLEASURES OF READING AND WRITING
    (Compulsory) enu522
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module, alongside its semester two companion module, ‘the perils of reading and writing’, will enable students to develop their reading and writing practices in various forms and for various purposes and audiences. Using Helen Sword’s ‘BASE’ model, students will consider the behavioural, artisanal, social and emotional aspects of reading and writing. The first semester module focuses on theories of reading and writing and explores the tensions between a paranoid criticality, what Paul Ricoeur dubbed ‘the hermeneutics of suspicion’, and Rita Felski’s argument for ‘recognition, enchantment, knowledge and shock’ (Uses of Literature, 2008). Using such reader response theories, the module will ask students to consider their own academic reading and writing practices and the extent to which expectations of critical analysis conflict with sensations of encountering and experience, as well as the artistry of craft and creativity. The module also provides the opportunity to recognise and perform the pleasures of reading and writing through specific workshop tasks designed to help students to develop their own best practice. There will be a focus on the ‘social’ aspects of reading and writing, including collegiality and collaboration. This will culminate in the production of a piece of collaborative digital writing based on the experience of reading for pleasure. The assessment will be supported by workshops on writing for digital platforms and a non-assessed formative submission of 1000 words mid-semester.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 76.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • explore a range of literary and non-literary texts focusing on the complexities inherent in textual production;

    • develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary, and linguistic characteristics of different types of writing;

    • focus on the role of readers in making meaning from texts, and understanding of the ethical responsibilities of textual interpretation and language use

    • engage students’ critical skills in the close reading and analysis of texts to enhance their capacity for independent thought and judgment in critical practice;

    • improve students’ ability to write to a specific brief and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing.

    • develop students’ literacy and communication skills to an advanced level in written and spoken work;

    • improve students’ self-efficacy in making effective use of feedback and reflecting on how this facilitates improvements in their own performance; and their ability to act independently, manage own time, plan and organise workload to meet deadlines;

    • explore with students how to work collaboratively to support each other, and in problem solving;

    • provide opportunities to practice the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required by employers. 

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • understand the distinctive literary, and linguistic characteristics of a range of literary and non-literary texts;

    • analyse the role of readers in making meanings from texts including the ethical responsibilities of textual interpretation and language use;

    • engage critically in close analysis of texts to enhance their capacity to question ideas and interpretations;

    • improve their ability to write to a specific brief, within set time limits and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing;

    • develop advanced literacy and communication skills in written and spoken work;

    • to give and receive feedback on written work, reflecting on how this facilitates improvements in their own performance;

    • act independently, manage own time, plan and organise workload to meet deadlines;

    • work collaboratively to support their peers, and in problem solving;

    • practice the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required by employers.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Small Group Digital Writing Task (2000 words)

  4. THE PERILS OF READING AND WRITING
    (Compulsory) enu523
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module, alongside its semester one companion module, ‘the pleasures of reading and writing’, will enable students to develop their reading and writing practices in various forms and for various purposes and audiences. Using Helen Sword’s ‘BASE’ model, students will consider the behavioural, artisanal, social and emotional aspects of reading and writing. The module’s trajectory is towards more risk, moving from a secure basis of competence into original research and stylish writing. Students will focus on practical skills: reading with attention, questioning what is written to develop their own research ideas, reflecting on their own habits of writing including emotional ones, and exploring strategies for writing effectively. Workshops where students write and discuss each other’s work will provide formative feedback on academic writing and writing for presentations. Assessment component 1 (timed work) will include an element of peer assessment building on the peer assessment in ENU415 and on the formative work in workshops. In the final weeks of the module, students apply what they have learnt in the module to write a dissertation proposal that is original and focused.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 76.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • explore a range of literary and non-literary texts focusing on the complexities inherent in textual production;

    • develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary, and linguistic characteristics of different types of writing;

    • focus on the role of readers in making meaning from texts, and understanding of the ethical responsibilities of textual interpretation and language use

    • engage students’ critical skills in the close reading and analysis of texts to enhance their capacity for independent thought and judgment in critical practice;

    • improve students’ ability to write to a specific brief and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing;

    • provide opportunities for student to participate constructively in workshop discussion of their own and other students’ work, reflecting constructively on their own and others’ writing and to give and respond to constructive feedback

    • develop students’ literacy and communication skills to an advanced level in written and spoken work;

    • improve students’ self-efficacy in making effective use of feedback and reflecting on how this facilitates improvements in their own performance; and their ability to act independently, manage own time, plan and organise workload to meet deadlines;

    • explore with students how to work collaboratively to support each other, and in problem solving;

    • provide opportunities to practice the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required by employers.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • understand the distinctive literary, and linguistic characteristics of a range of literary and non-literary texts;

    • analyse the role of readers in making meanings from texts including the ethical responsibilities of textual interpretation and language use;

    • engage critically in close analysis of texts to enhance their capacity to question ideas and interpretations;

    • improve their ability to write to a specific brief, within set time limits and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing;

    • participate constructively in workshop discussion of their own and other students’ work, reflecting constructively on their own and others’ writing and to give and respond to constructive feedback

    • develop advanced literacy and communication skills in written and spoken work;

    • to give and receive feedback on written work, reflecting on how this facilitates improvements in their own performance;

    • act independently, manage own time, plan and organise workload to meet deadlines;

    • work collaboratively to support their peers, and in problem solving;

    • practice the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required by employers.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 60% Timed Work

    Component 2 - 40% Dissertation Proposal (750 words)

  5. THEORISING TEXTUAL IDENTITIES
    (Optional) enu524
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module develops students’ understanding of modern critical and theoretical approaches to studying literature, building on the introduction to literary and cultural theory in relation to identity on the level 4 module ENU419, and the introduction to modern critical approaches in studying literature on ENU415, ENU416, and ENU406. Students will read key theoretical/critical essays in relation to constructions of identity in the context of postmodern and poststructuralist formations of subjecthood (psychoanalysis; feminism/postfeminism; postcolonialism; cultural materialism; queer theory; disability studies). Seminar workshops will include practical opportunities to apply theories to literary and cultural texts, and the module will also feature a group cinema trip to see a contemporary film. The assessment for this module will be a portfolio including a review of the film we have seen, applying a theoretical perspective of the students’ choice, and an analysis of a music video applying a different theoretical perspective of the students’ choice, and a reflective piece on their experience of reading theory on the module. Formative feedback will be given on writing reviews as part of the taught sessions, for further discussion in individual tutorials.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 41.00 Independent   : 159.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Develop students’ awareness of modern critical approaches to studying literature and culture

    • Extend students’ knowledge of the theoretical underpinnings, terminology and specific concepts relating to various critical approaches

    • Extend students’ knowledge and understanding of the ideological and ethical issues in the representation of identities in contemporary literature, theory, and culture

    • Enable students to select and apply appropriate methods of criticism to literary and cultural texts

    • Develop students’ awareness of the ways in which literary and cultural texts may be interpreted differently within particular literary, cultural and socio-historical contexts,

    • Develop students’ ability to produce independent work of an appropriate academic standard.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Discuss the background, theoretical underpinnings and key strategies of a number of critical approaches in an intelligent, coherent, and ethically engaged manner

    • Understand the ways in which the interpretation of literary texts can vary in accordance with social, historical, political, and cultural context

    • Engage with the ideological implications of literary and cultural representation

    • Use critical terminology accurately

    • Produce sophisticated and imaginative analyses of literary and cultural texts using relevant critical concepts

    • Develop ability to write to a specific brief, and to engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing

    • Develop literacy and communication skills, and the ability to apply these in appropriate contexts and in ways that create work that is coherently structured

    • Develop self-efficacy including ability to act independently, manage own time, plan and organise workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon own learning making effective use of feedback and support to facilitate improvements in own performance

    • Ability to identify career opportunities and reflect on the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (4000 words)

  6. TEXTUAL INTERVENTIONS
    (Optional) enu525
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module is a specialist subject module that asks students to enact a literary intervention into a critical issue at this specific contemporary socio-political ‘conjuncture’. The precise content of the module will depend on the research area of the module leader and its application to a relevant moment of contemporary crisis. The module will begin with a series of taught sessions on the chosen subject as well as, more generally, introducing students to the ways in which literature and society intersect and the ability of ‘text’ to perform socially and politically. The taught sessions will enable students to identify primary works and their own critical approach to the subject. The remainder of the in-class sessions will support independent group projects in which students will collaborate on a piece of assessed work that uses literature/film to pose an intervention into the prevailing discourses currently shaping the subject. The assessed work could take the form of: a public presentation or performance for a specified audience; a public display for a specific location; a taught session at a local school; a digital artefact hosted by a relevant group/platform; a symposium of papers/posters for a specified audience. The module will build on group work skills developed at Level 4 in ‘Challenging the Canon’ and through in-class exercises and reflection. Project groups will have regular tutorials with the module leader where they will be provided with formative feedback.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the complex ways in which literature can engage and intervene in urgent social, cultural and political spaces and debates

    • Develop students’ knowledge of the ways in which critical readers can mediate between a literary text and an audience to effectively intervene in contemporary debates on a given subject

    • Develop independent research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate, interpret and synthesise complex information from diverse sources

    • Develop skills for collaborative learning and working

    • Develop students’ ability to identify the attributes, skills and approaches developed through study in the Humanities and valued by employers

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Enact a literary intervention into a critical issue at this specific contemporary socio-political ‘conjuncture’, demonstrating an understanding of how contexts (historical, cultural, geographical, economic, political and social) which can determine interpretation, and the ideological implications of these contexts

    • Demonstrate their ability to discuss relevant critical concepts in relation to literature and a capacity for independent thought and judgment in critical practice

    • Develop their research skills, including ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material

    • Collaborate productively with others in project management, research, negotiation, problem solving, writing, and delivery

    • Develop self-efficacy including ability to act independently, manage own time, plan and organise workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon own learning making effective use of feedback and support to facilitate improvements in own performance

    • Identify and reflect on the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Group Project (4000 word equivalent)

  7. STYLE, LITERATURE AND THE EVERYDAY ART OF LANGUAGE
    (Optional) enu526
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module introduces students to topics in Stylistics, the application of linguistic analysis to literature, broadly defined. These topics may include Metaphor, Cohesion, Narrative, Functional Grammar, Conversation Analysis, Feminist Stylistics, and Translation. This module focuses on giving a theoretical and practical knowledge background in Stylistics by presenting linguistically-orientated approaches to the literary texts. Students critically examine theory and method, with reference to contemporary research in the field and with a focus on the benefits and challenges of empirical analysis of literary source material. Using knowledge of theory and method, students employ these skills to undertake their own analysis of literary texts, choosing from a range of methods and data. Students will receive regular formative feedback both from their tutor and peers on group and individual work throughout the module.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Help students gain a detailed knowledge of the field of Stylistics, with an appreciation for the different approaches to the study of literature from linguistic perspectives applied by scholars;

    • Develop knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically a range of theoretical approaches to the study of Stylistics, while looking at a range of different texts;

    • Develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of how linguistics can be used to investigate meaning in particular social and cultural contexts and how these contexts contribute to how texts are both produced and read;

    • Develop students' ability to think critically about the linguistic study of literature and to write analyse text in structured, reflective and analytical ways;

    • Help students explain and critically evaluate significant issues in recent linguistic approaches to literature;

    • Equip student to examine, justify and apply a variety of theoretical positions and be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives;

    • Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of resources including linguistic texts and journal articles.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Develop their knowledge and understanding of how linguistics is used to describe and analyse literature;

    • Gain a broad knowledge and understanding of a range of theoretical approaches to stylistics and how these theories affect methodology;

    • Gain a detailed knowledge of a range of approaches analysis of literature from a linguistic perspective, as well as the appropriacy of different approaches in different settings

    • Apply a range of critical approaches to stylistics analysis, with a focus on students’ own interests both in text types and analytic approaches;

    • Produce their own small-scale analysis of a literary text, with a focus on the applying their chosen method in a reliable and consistent way;

    • Develop their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation of work in stylistic analysis, while appreciating the complexities in approaches by different scholars

    • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;

    • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy in terms of their own analysis, by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances;

    • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Essay (3500 words)

  8. LANGUAGE, SOCIETY AND POWER
    (Optional) enu527
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module introduces the key concepts and methods in the field of Sociolinguistics. In particular, students will learn how variations in language use relate to race, class, and gender and how these variations have been theorised and studied. Key sociolinguistic studies will be examined and discussed, helping students understand how the study of language has influenced and been influenced by sociological theory and how these theories have been adapted over time. The methods used in these analyses will covered both large scale linguistic ethnographies of different communities and small-scale analysis of individual interactions. An emphasis will also be placed on critical studies of how social power structures are maintained and perpetuated in language use. Using this knowledge, students are then expected to undertake their own research, investigating topics covered in the module and to critically evaluate source material they choose for themselves. Students will receive regular formative feedback both from their tutor and peers on group and individual work throughout the module.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Help students gain a detailed knowledge of the field of sociolinguistics, with an appreciation for the different approaches to the study of language in society applied by scholars in different areas of linguistics;

    • Help students' gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of how linguistics investigates the meanings of texts and talk in particular social contexts and how the use of language contributes to the development and perpetuation of power structures;

    • Develop students' knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically a range of theoretical approaches to language study and how they influence methods of language study, particularly the study of race, gender, and class in language variation;

    • Develop students' ability to think critically about language in society and to write about it in ways that are structured, reflective and analytical;

    • Explore systematically and critically evaluate the language use in particular contexts and theorise about why differences might be present;

    • Help students think critically about how power structures are maintained both in language use and preference for particular forms of English;

    • Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of resources, including linguistic texts, their own gathered data, and journal articles.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Gain a detailed knowledge of a range of approaches analysis of language in particular social settings, as well as the appropriacy of different approaches in different settings;

    • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of a range of theoretical approaches to the sociological study of language and how these theories affect methodology;

    • Understand the social contexts which can determine the interpretation of language, and the ideological implications of these contexts for constructing social identities

    • Gain a detailed knowledge of the ethical responsibilities of language use

    • Gain a substantial knowledge of the range of language data that can be used in Sociolinguistic research.

    • Apply a range of critical approaches to language analysis, with a focus on students’ own interests;

    • Produce their own small-scale analysis of interaction or a written or spoken text of their choosing, with a focus on the applying their chosen method in a reliable and consistent way;

    • Develop their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation of work in Sociolinguistics, while appreciating the complexities with which the term ‘discourse analysis’ is used in different settings

    • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;

    • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy in terms of their own analysis, by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances;

    • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Essay (4000 words)

  9. VICTORIAN LITERATURE
    (Optional) enu528
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    On this module students will undertake a contextual, thematic and theoretical study of Victorian novels and poetry and film adaptations of Victorian fictional sources. The module will begin with an exploration of the nineteenth-century context: industry and the idea of progress, empire and slavery, gender role and performance, domestic life, science, technology and medicine, and religious faith. Each text will then be examined in the light of these contextual issues and ideas using appropriate theoretical models. Critical approaches will include cultural studies, feminist criticism, postcolonial criticism, psychoanalytic criticism, and neo-Marxist conceptualisations of ideology and hegemony. The module will also focus on the ways in which canonical Victorian novels and narrative poems have been translated for film and television. Referring back to the level 4 modules ENU419 and ENU406, students will further develop their understanding of how meanings are produced on screen by exploring how particular directors have interpreted Victorian identity and illuminated, obscured or transformed the ‘meaning’ of source texts in relation to twentieth- and twenty-first-century hegemonic values. Students are assessed via a portfolio, comprising of an analysis of a text chosen from the selection taught in the sessions - either a Victorian novel or poem, or a screen adaptation – with a specific focus on one or two key themes, and an essay considering a second taught text from both a thematic and theoretical perspective. Formative feedback opportunities will comprise of a short annotated bibliography (500 words) of the secondary materials used for the portfolio pieces. Students will receive tutorial feedback on this, with further advice on reading strategies before they begin work on the portfolio.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Help students gain a knowledge of a Victorian texts and their film adaptations

    • Help students to understand the complexities inherent in textual production

    • Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary and visual characteristics of Victorian literary genres and film adaptations

    • Understanding of the contexts (historical, cultural geographical, economic, political and social) which can determine the form and interpretation of Victorian literature and film adaptations and the ideological implications of these contexts for constructing social identity;

    • Develop students' understanding of the ways in which various literary and film theories or analytical models can be used in Victorian literature and film adaptations

    • Develop students’ knowledge of the role of readers in making meaning from texts, and understanding of the ethical responsibilities of textual interpretation

    • Develop students' critical skills in the close reading and analysis of Victorian literature and film adaptations and capacity for independent thought and judgment in critical practice

    • Develop students’ command of appropriate literary and filmic critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation

    • Explore the relationship between literature and film, with a focus on the different conventions through which meaning is generated within these two forms.

    • Develop a sensitivity to generic conventions and the effects of authorship, production and audience on literature and film

    • Develop strengths in identifying contexts of film and literary production and the ways in which they affect the construction of meaning.

    • Develop skills in writing to a specific brief and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing.

    • Advanced literacy and communication skills, whether written, spoken or visual and the ability to apply these in appropriate contexts and in ways that create work that is coherently structured.

    • Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of secondary critical material and electronic

    • Develop self-efficacy including ability to act independently, manage own time, plan and organise workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon own learning making effective use of feedback and support to facilitate improvements in own performance

    • Develop students’ ability to collaborate productively with others in research, negotiation, problem solving, writing, and presentation skills.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Gain a detailed knowledge of a range of Victorian texts and their film adaptations, and an understanding of the complexities inherent in textual production

    • Gain a detailed knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts in which the literature was written and the film adaptations produced and the ideological implications of these contexts for constructing social identity;

    • Develop students' understanding of the ways in which various literary and film theories or analytical models can be used in Victorian literature and film adaptations

    • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary characteristics of nineteenth-century literature and the audio and visual characteristics of different film adaptations

    • Explore the relationship between literature and film, with a focus on the different conventions through which meaning is generated within these two forms.

    • Develop students' critical skills in the close reading and analysis of Victorian literature and film adaptations and capacity for independent thought and judgment in critical practice

    • Develop students’ command of appropriate literary and filmic critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation

    • Develop strengths in identifying contexts of film and literary production and the ways in which they affect the construction of meaning

    • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of generic conventions of Victorian literature and film adaptations and the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts

    • Develop skills in writing to a specific brief and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing.

    • Advanced literacy and communication skills, whether written, spoken or visual and the ability to apply these in appropriate contexts and in ways that create work that is coherently structured.

    • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material;

    • Develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (4000 words)

  1. DISSERTATION IN ENGLISH
    (Optional) enu601
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    The dissertation allows students to undertake a sustained piece of independent research into a topic of their own choosing, and to apply the concepts, theories and methodologies (as relevant) that they have learnt about during their degree. Students can choose to work in the areas of Creative Writing, English literature, English language, Film Studies or Literature and Film; their research should show a grounding in current research and establish clear lines of original enquiry. Research skills specific to the module will be practised in a series of workshops towards the beginning of the module (time management; working with a supervisor; identifying strengths and area for development); thereafter, students will be supported by an individual supervisor with whom they will arrange individual tutorials. Formative assessment will be provided in tutorials, via ‘writing samples’ where student can submit work for tutor feedback, and the assessed presentation element of the module.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 12.00 Independent   : 386.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 398.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • enable students to gain an in-depth knowledge of a specific area of English studies in which they are particularly interested;

    • provide opportunities for students to develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of the distinctive creative, literary, linguistic and/or visual characteristics of genres, methods and/or theoretical approaches relevant to their dissertation;

    • allow student to demonstrate an explicit understanding of the stylistic and structural features of specific forms of writing;

    • encourage students to reflect in an explicit manner on the style, structure and content of their own writing and/or that of others as relevant;

    • enable students to employ effective stylistic and structural features, which matches form to content, purpose and audience;

    • provide opportunities for students to reflect in an explicit manner on the writing process;

    • teach students how to choose and apply relevant methods and/or critical approaches independently in their close reading and analysis of texts;

    • allow student to show their achievement in using advanced literacy and communication skills which produce work that is coherently structured to produce a clear argument or evaluation, written in a scholarly way, including the use of critical, analytical and theoretical terminology;

    • allow students to show their ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level;

    • develop, in students, an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, and act independently as appropriate; independently research including scoping and planning a project, developing an appropriate reading list to support the project; manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning;

    • enable students to identify career opportunities and reflect critically on the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • gain an in-depth knowledge of a specific area of English studies;

    • develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of the distinctive creative, literary, linguistic and/or visual characteristics of genres, methods and/or theoretical approaches relevant to their dissertation;

    • demonstrate an explicit understanding of the stylistic and structural features of specific forms of writing;

    • reflect in an explicit manner on the style, structure and content of their own writing and/or that of others as relevant;

    • employ effective stylistic and structural features, which matches form to content, purpose and audience;

    • reflect in an explicit manner on the writing process;

    • apply relevant methods and/or critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of texts;

    • develop advanced literacy and communication skills which produce work that is coherently structured to produce a clear argument or evaluation, written in a scholarly way, including the use of critical, analytical and theoretical terminology;

    • show their ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level;

    • develop an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, and act independently as appropriate; independently research including scoping and planning a project, developing an appropriate reading list to support the project; manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning;

    • identify career opportunities and reflect critically on the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 15% Individual Presentation (7 minutes)

    Component 2 - 85% Dissertation (10,000 words)

  2. LITERATURE IN THE MODERN WORLD 1900 - 1950
    (Optional) enu603
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will engage students in a socio-historical and gender-political study of a number of 20th century texts pre-World War II. They will examine developments in literary form during the modern period and explore the relationship of these emerging forms with the social, cultural and historical context in which texts were produced and received. Students will focus on the ways in which form interacted with key themes which emerged in modern writings: the war, gender, social class, psychology and identity, industrialisation, mechanisation and the city, family life, faith and disappointment/ disillusion. A variety of critical theories will be applied including: gender and performance theory, psychoanalytic theory, structuralism and post-structuralism and ideology. The module will begin with a preliminary exploration of the transition between early Victorianism optimism and realism in literature through to a growing sense of pessimism and literary experimentalism in fin- de-siècle writing to the despair and fragmentation of style and mood which characterised literature written after the First World War. Students then study Modernism as a style, form and set of ideas, exploring the characteristics in modernist novels, short stories and poems. Following this they will explore popular realist and genre novels outside of the modernist paradigm, recently evaluated by critics working in Middlebrow studies as equally as valid as iconic modernist texts in their representations of the modern world. Students will submit a 500-word formative piece of writing part-way through the module, identifying key modernist features in a passage chosen from one text; following this, they will receive tutorial feedback. The assessed assignment will comprise a comparative essay, focussing on the treatment of one theme in two taught texts, each written by a different author or poet.    

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Help students gain a detailed knowledge of a substantial range of texts written in the early twentieth century;

    • Help students gain a strong understanding of the distinctive literary characteristics of genres associated with modern literature;

    • Help students gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the contexts (historical, cultural geographical, economic, political and social) which can determine the form and interpretation of modern literary texts, and the ideological implications of these contexts for constructing social identities

    • Provide students with a sophisticated knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary characteristics of modernist works and inter-war middlebrow texts;

    • Provide students with a sophisticated knowledge and understanding of the ways in which various literary theories or analytical models can be used in the exploration of modernist literature;

    • Develop students’ ability to think critically about literature from the Modern period and to write about it in ways that are sophisticated, reflective and analytical, using independent thought and judgment;

    • Develop students’ knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate literature critically using concepts and ideas associated with modernism and the middlebrow;

    • Help students gain a good knowledge of the role of readers in making meaning from texts, and a firm understanding of the ethical responsibilities of textual interpretation

    • Develop students’ command of appropriate and extensive literary critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation.

    • Engender in students sensitivity to the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts.

    • Engender in students a confident ability to identify contexts of textual production and the ways in which they affect the construction of meaning.

    • Help students develop a strong grasp of how to write to a specific brief and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing.

    • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills, whether written, spoken or visual and give students the ability to apply these in appropriate contexts and in ways that create work that is coherently structured.

    • Encourage self-efficacy in students, including ability to act independently, manage their time, plan and organise workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning making effective use of feedback and support to facilitate improvements in their performance.

    • Enhance their ability to collaborate productively with others in research, negotiation, problem solving, writing, and presentation skills

    • Hone their research skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of secondary critical material and electronic resources.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Gain a detailed knowledge of a wide range of texts from the early part of the twentieth century;
    • Gain a strong understanding of the distinctive literary characteristics of genres   associated with Modern literature;
    • Gain a wide-ranging and sophisticated knowledge of the historical, cultural, geographic, economic and social contexts of the production of Modern literature and the ideological implications of these contexts for constructing social identities

    • Gain a sophisticated knowledge and understanding of how to apply critical approaches to Modernist literary texts;
    • Think critically about literature from the Modern period and to write about it in ways that are sophisticated, reflective and analytical, using independent thought and judgment;

    • Develop to an advanced level an ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation;

    • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of generic conventions and the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts;

    • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;

    • Develop a strong grasp of how to write to a specific brief and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing.

    • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level;

    • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing an ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Comparative Essay (3500 words)

  3. GENDER TROUBLE
    (Optional) enu606
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module asks students to examine literary and cultural representations of sex, gender, sexuality, and sexual transgression through the lens of relevant modern critical theories, such as: feminism; queer theory; transgender studies; masculinity studies; poststructuralism; psychoanalysis; postcolonialism. Through analysis of a range of texts from the nineteenth to twenty-first century, students will engage with concepts such as: the construction of gender and sexuality; performativity; heteronormativity; the relationship between desire and identity; intersections between gender identity, sexuality and race. Primary texts and the issues they raise will be situated in their socio-historical contexts, and students will explore the politics of representation in literary and cultural texts (including literary fiction, popular/genre fiction, and film). Students will be required to engage in these topics in a reflective, critical, and ethical way. The module will require students to undertake research on a specific topic, critically analyse literary texts, and produce a cogent, scholarly argument informed by relevant theoretical concepts, and assessed via presentation at a dedicated student conference. Part of the final mark for the presentation will be agreed by peer-assessment, building on the skills students have developed in this technique in ENU415, and ENU523. Students are thus encouraged to conceptualise the assessment as the development of professional, transferable skills beyond their degree. The structure of the taught sessions will enable students to have the opportunity to present their ideas on primary texts, contexts and theories in order to receive formative feedback to work towards the assessed presentation.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 44.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 208.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Enable students to engage with debates surrounding the understanding of sex, gender, and sexuality, and their representations in a range of literary and cultural texts

    • Help students gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of how historical, cultural, political and social contexts affect the representation of sex, gender and sexuality

    • Develop students’ ability to critically analyse and compare the set texts, evaluating their similarities and differences in representations of sex, gender, and sexuality as well as their ideological implications

    • Develop the students’ awareness of modern and contemporary critical practices relevant to the examination of sex, gender and sexuality and their ability to select and apply appropriate methods of criticism to literary and cultural texts

    • Enable students to articulate cogent and ethically-engaged arguments about the representation of sex, gender, and sexuality using relevant theoretical and critical concepts and terminolog

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Gain a detailed knowledge of a wide range of texts from the nineteenth to twenty-first century which raise issues about sex, gender, and sexuality in the modern world  

    • Gain a wide-ranging and sophisticated knowledge of the historical, cultural, political and social contexts of the production of texts representing sex, gender, and sexuality

    • Develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of a wide range of theoretical approaches relevant to the examination of representations of sex, gender and sexuality in literary and cultural texts, and to explore the ideological implications of these perspectives

    • Develop a sophisticated understanding of the ethical responsibilities of textual interpretation

    • Apply in a sophisticated way a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of modern texts representing sex, gender, and sexuality

    • Develop to an advanced level their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation

    • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these contexts and create work which is coherently structured

    • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level

    • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facility improvements in their own performances

    • Ability to identify career opportunities and reflect on the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed, and employers.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Individual Presentation (20 minutes)

  4. A GOLDEN AGE?: POST-WAR LITERATURE
    (Optional) enu607
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    Students will be introduced to a range of British literary texts from the period 1945-1970. Students will place texts within historical, social and cultural contexts and examine the texts’ engagement with pertinent contemporary issues, such as: class, social mobility, education, the welfare state, national identity, gender inequality, second-wave feminism, race, immigration, the move from austerity to affluence, advances in science and technology, the aftermath of the Second World War, and the Cold War. The module will also ask students to consider issues surrounding genre, narrative form, and the relationship between realism and experimentalism in literature of this period. The module aims to develop students’ understanding of critical approaches relevant to the analysis of post-war literature, such as: feminism, postcolonialism, poststructuralism, psychoanalysis, Marxism and ecocriticism. The module is assessed by a portfolio of work which asks students to critically engage with criticism contemporary to the period as well as to undertake research on a specific and relevant topic, critically analyse literary texts, and produce a cogent, scholarly argument informed by specific critical concepts.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Advance students’ ability to relate literary texts of the post-war period to their historical, social and cultural contexts

    • Advance students’ ability to critically analyse and compare the set texts, evaluating their similarities and differences

    • Further develop students’ awareness of modern and contemporary critical practices and their ability to select and apply appropriate methods of criticism to literary texts from the post-war period

    • Enable students to explicate and negotiate differences in critical opinion and the literary interpretation of texts at different historical periods.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of a wide range of texts from the post-war period

    • Gain a wide-ranging and sophisticated knowledge of the historical, cultural and social contexts of the production of texts in the post-war period, and the ideological implications of these contexts for constructing social identities

    • Develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of a wide range of theoretical approaches relevant to the analysis of post-war literature

    • Apply in a sophisticated way a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of texts from the post-war period

    • Apply advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level

    • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (4000 words)

  5. FROM SUPERHEROES AND SYLVIA PLATH
    (Optional) enu610
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will begin by exploring how the mythologisation of American history in relation to concepts of manifest destiny, American exceptionalism and the Western frontier have created imaginative conceptions of heroic masculinity in culture, folklore, literature and film which, since the Vietnam war have been increasingly challenged and deconstructed. This exploration of key American myths will involve discussions about the ‘American Dream’, from its original inception in pioneer culture as a faith in social, religious and spiritual utopian possibility to its transformation into a material and individualist beacon of capitalist ideology in the twentieth and twenty-first century. The module will examine the fundamental present day relationship between mythical representations of American identity and the global aspirations of American economic and political institutions. Students will study Hollywood film productions, countercultural cinema and prose fiction which center on debates about the credence of the all- American masculine hero and The American Dream. There will be a particular focus on the gendered nature of space through the study of texts which speak for American women, who have always had limited access to the freedoms associated with the dream. Students will also examine texts which represent the experiences of African American, immigrant and Native American subjects, for whom The Dream has never been very achievable. You will be encouraged to draw comparisons between the treatment of American identity in relatable literary and cinematic texts, and close critical analysis will be supported by readings on cultural history and cultural theory, particularly feminist studies, neo-Marxist perspectives and race studies. Texts and ideas on the topic of masculinity will typically include: perspectives on (super) heroism in frontier novel, Huckleberry Finn, Hollywood films starring John Wayne, Vietnam text, Night of the living Dead, and Postmodern productions, Midnight Cowboy, Reservoir Dogs, The Avengers Assemble and Blade Runner. Topic two texts, which examine the concept of The American Dream, will typically include The Great Gatsby, a selected Disney film, The Death of a Salesman, and Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? Topic three texts which bring different alternative gender and race-related experiences to the debate will typically include The Bell Jar, The House of Mirth, Thelma and Louise, The Bluest Eye, Beloved, Rag Time and Love medicine. Two or three texts relating to each of the three thematic clusters will be explored in depth. The assessment for the module will comprise a formative piece (500 words) comprising a summary and analysis of a text of the students’ choice and a summative comparative essay, requiring students to analyse one set text alongside the text which has not been taught in the sessions, which was identified in the formative piece. Scheduled workshops will help students to select from a list of suggested texts or even choose their own to research for the assignment.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Help students gain an extensive knowledge of a substantial range of American films and literary texts Knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary and visual characteristics of different literary and film genres;
    • Help students gain a strong understanding of the complexities inherent in the textual production of American film and literature;
    • Help students gain a sensitivity to generic conventions and the effects of authorship, production and audience on American texts;
    • Help students gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the American historical, cultural, geographical, social, political and economic contexts in which films and literary texts are produced, how these can affect the construction of meaning, and the ideological implications of these contexts for constructing social identities;
    • Develop students’ ability to think very critically about film and literature from the period and to become reflective and analytical;
    • Develop a strong knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically theoretical approaches related to American Studies, recognising how these pertain to issues of American identity and dominant ideology;
    • Develop students understanding of the effect of American ideology and Hollywood cinema on the international and global community;
    • Develop students’ knowledge of the role of readers in making meaning from texts, and understanding of the ethical responsibilities of textual interpretation;
    • Develop students’ command of appropriate literary, linguistic and filmic critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation;
    • Develop good skills and a confident ability in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of secondary critical material;
    • Promote students understanding of the range and diversity of English Studies and its relationship with Film Studies and American Studies, including appreciation of the integration of these different disciplines;
    • Foster students’ ability to write well to a specific brief and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing;

    Develop students’ advanced literacy and communication skills, whether written, spoken or visual and the ability to apply these in appropriate contexts and in ways that create work that is coherently structured.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Gain a detailed knowledge of a wide range of American films and literary texts;

    • Gain an understanding of the complexities inherent in the textual production of American film and literature;

    • Gain a wide-ranging and sophisticated knowledge of the historical, cultural, social, political and economic contexts of the production of American films and literary texts;

    • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of theoretical approaches related to American Studies and the ideological implications of these contexts for constructing social identities;

    • Gain a sophisticated knowledge and understanding of the distinctive thematic characteristics of American literature and visual and thematic characteristics of American film;

    • Apply in an intellectual and sophisticated way critical approaches associated with American Studies to their close reading and analysis of American literature and Film;

    • Develop to an advanced level their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation;

    • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the conventions of American literature and films and the effects of authorship, production and audience on these texts;

    • Gain knowledge of the role of readers in making meaning from texts, and understanding the ethical responsibilities of textual interpretation;

    • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;

    • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level;

    • Foster in students an ability to write to a specific brief and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing

    • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time and plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Comparative Essay (3500 words)

  6. POSTCOLONIAL BRITISH LITERATURE
    (Optional) enu614
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module will explore contemporary Black and Asian British literature using the paradigms of postcolonial theory, for example race, hybridity, diaspora, language and nation. Students will be encouraged to make connections between these texts, the history of imperialism and cultural discourses around immigration since the 1950s. The module will encourage students to discuss and explore topics in relation to set readings, their own experiences, and their own research. Formative assessment will be in the form of a presentation on part of the portfolio for which students will get feedback from their peers and the tutor.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Advance students’ understanding of postcolonial theory in relation to the literature of post-imperial Britain;

    • problematise notions of cultural norms and judgements by indicating how these are linked to cultural, social, historical and political specificities;

    • enable sophisticated discussions of a range of literature - poetry and prose – through close reading, based on the theoretical and contextual ideas explored in the module;

    • encourage sophistication in the students’ abilities to write at length on a topic in essay form, forming coherent arguments and fully developing their ideas in dialogue with primary and secondary sources;

    • promote student led learning and independence by encouraging students to lead discussion and by embedding learning in their lived experiences as ‘postcolonial’ subjects;

    • encourage students to undertake independent research to support their learning and within assessment.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Develop a detailed understanding of a range of postcolonial theory in relation to the literature of post-imperial Britain;

    • problematise notions of cultural norms and judgements by indicating how these are linked to cultural, social, historical and political specificities;

    • discuss in depth a range of literature - poetry and prose -applying the theoretical and contextual ideas with some sophistication and understanding;

    • develop sophistication in the ability to write at length on a topic in essay form, forming coherent arguments and fully developing their ideas in dialogue with primary and secondary sources;

    • lead discussion to practice independence by leading discussions and by embedding learning in their lived experiences as ‘postcolonial’ subjects;

    • undertake independent research to support their learning and within assessment.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (4000 words)

  7. THE LITERARY SCENE
    (Optional) enu615
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Students on this module will be introduced to various agents in the literary field through lectures, readings and seminars. Alongside the taught element, students will be pursuing their own understanding and actively in engaging in the literary scene through attending local literary events, running their own book clubs, and working on an assessed group project to set up and populate a literary ezine. The group assessment task focuses on skills development in the areas of digital writing, website building, and collaborative group work. There will be opportunities to develop these skills and receive formative feedback through in-class workshops and group tutorials. The Careers Service will run a digital writing for employability workshop during the module.

     

    Students can expect to engage with ideas and debates around contemporary literary issues such as:

     

    • Literary prizes and bestsellers - literary prize-winning culture, its controversies and purposes for different stakeholders; the notion of ‘literary value’ through exploring inter-linked ideas of popularity, bestsellers, and high cultural forms. 

    • Publishing and marketing - the popularity and proliferation of literary festivals, author readings and interviews and other literary events; the resurgence of ‘the author’ as a material presence in literary culture; spin-offs from literature into other media (e.g. film and TV); the development of online publishing/reading.

    • Readers and reading - reading as an individual and a group activity; the rise of the book club in different kinds of spaces (e.g. local, television, pop-ups, virtual); questions about how we read, reader response theory, and interpretative communities.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Advance students’ knowledge and understanding of the practices, debates and theories relevant to the contemporary literary scene

    • Advance students’ knowledge and understanding of how contexts (historical, cultural geographical, economic, political and social) can determine the form and interpretation of texts and language, and the ideological implications of these contexts

    • Enable students to recognise and experience literary culture beyond the academic

    • Develop students’ ability to write in different contexts for different audiences, to produce work that is coherently structured, written in an appropriate way, whilst maintaining advanced literacy and communication skills;

    • Help students to identify career opportunities and reflect on the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers, particularly in terms of digital writing and collaborative work skills.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Demonstrate their ability to analyse and participate in debates about the contemporary literary scene, in class sessions but also in public local and virtual spaces

    • Choose their own primary reading and pursue their independent literary interests through attendance at literary events, running their own book clubs, and developing content for the group project website

    • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in different contexts for different audiences to produce work that is coherently structured, written in an appropriate way for a specific platform and audience

    • Identify career opportunities and reflect on the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers, particularly in terms of digital writing and collaborative work skills.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 30% Individual Event Review (1500 words)

    Component 2 - 70% Group Project (2500 word equivalent)

  8. NEO-VICTORIANISM: REWRITING THE 19TH CENTURY
    (Optional) enu618
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    Students will be introduced to a range of texts and films from the genre of Neo-Victorianism: contemporary cultural productions which are set in the nineteenth century, but interested in rewriting the historical narrative of the era. Students will explore the historical and social contexts of neo-Victorian culture, focusing on the politics of identity. Theoretical approaches such as feminism, queer theory, disability studies and postcolonialism will develop students’ understanding of the representation of gender, sexuality, disability, race and class in the module’s primary texts. Students will engage with a range of critical sources about the politics and ethics of neo-Victorianism to develop a detailed knowledge of the significant critical themes and debates of neo-Victorian studies. They will be supported to develop sophisticated critical writing skills via formative tasks in seminar sessions, in preparation for the assessed critical review of a neo-Victorian artefact at the end of the module.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Enable students to gain a detailed knowledge of representations of Victorian literature and culture in contemporary cultural productions

    • Enable students to relate neo-Victorian texts to their historical, social, and cultural contexts

    • Develop students’ ability to critically analyse how a range of identities (gender, sexuality, disability, race, class) are represented in neo-Victorian literature and culture

    • Develop students’ ability to understand and participate in theoretical and critical debates about neo-Victorianism

    • Enable students to articulate cogent critical arguments about the politics of identity in neo-Victorian cultural productions.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Gain a detailed knowledge of a wide range of cultural texts from the 20th-21st century which rewrite the nineteenth century

    • Gain a wide-ranging and sophisticated knowledge of the historical, cultural, political and social contexts of neo-Victorian cultural texts, and to be able to interrogate the genre’s ideological and ethical implications

    • Develop to an advanced level their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation

    • Develop advanced literary and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured

    • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources, and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level

    • Ability to write to a specific brief and engage productively and professionally in the process of revision and editing

    • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performance.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Critical Review of Neo-Victorian Artefact (4000 words)

  9. PROFESSIONAL PORTFOLIO
    (Compulsory) enu620
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This last creative writing module is designed to encourage students to look ahead to their professional writing life beyond university. Students will have the freedom to select the theme and genre of their choice for their writing portfolio. Additionally, students will explore the various routes by which their writing might be published, performed, or exhibited. Students will develop an increased understanding of various aspects of the publishing industry (e.g. where and how to promote and pitch work; how to prepare writing for submission; e-publishing). Other forms of career development for writers will also be explored (e.g. writing in the community, teaching creative writing; writer in residence roles). Using their own research and such guidance the students will develop their own Personal Development Plan (PDP). The PDP, which is based on the model developed by The Writer’s Compass (NAWE’s professional advisory service), will encourage students to set time-linked targets for their next steps as writers. By the end of the module each student should have shared a piece of their portfolio writing with a wider writing community through means of publication, performance, or installation. Workshops supply opportunities for formative feedback on writing. Guest writers and lecturers also allow access to a range of specialisms and voices.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Develop the students’ ability to employ various structural and stylistic effects in their own writing, matching aspects of form and content to factors such as genre and context;
    • Develop the students’ literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in a range of contexts;
    • Develop the students’ ability to engage in a productive and professional manner in the processes of the revision and editing of their writing;
    • Enable students to develop skills of an increasingly sophisticated nature in research and organization;
    • Further develop the students’ knowledge of the wider writing community (e.g. creative organisations; local writing groups; resource bases; publishing opportunities; writing awards and competitions);
    • Prepare students for employment by offering them the opportunity to identify career opportunities (e.g. routes for publication and a range of different writer roles) and reflect on the attributes, skills, attitudes or approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Demonstrate an advanced ability to employ various structural and stylistic effects in their own writing, matching aspects of form and content to factors such as genre and context;
    • Demonstrate advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in a range of contexts;
    • Demonstrate a developed knowledge of the wider writing community (e.g. creative organisations; local writing groups; resource bases; publishing opportunities; writing awards and competitions);
    • Demonstrate an ability to engage with the wider writing community and to promote their own writing;
    • Demonstrate an increased capacity for independent thought and judgment in critical and creative practice;
    • Demonstrate an ability to engage in a productive and professional manner in the processes of revision and editing and to produce copy that follows appropriate conventions (e.g. publishers’ conventions; competition requirements);
    • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material;
    • Act independently, manage own time, and plan and organise projects to meet specified targets and deadlines;
    • To identify career opportunities and reflect on the attributes, skills, attitudes or approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Writing Portfolio (4500 words)

  10. LANGUAGE AND MEDIA
    (Optional) enu621
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module explores the varieties of discourses utilised in mass and social/new media and how these discourses contribute to the representation of individuals, groups, events and nations. Links between discourse and ideology will be explored, with a particular focus on the ways in which aspects of gender, class, and race are represented through various media and online. The module will consider the relationships among representation, genre, audience, multimodality and ideology, as they are produced in media and social media contexts. The module will explore the relationship between words and images (multimodality) and the conventions which media producers and consumers draw on for production and consumption of texts. Considering these issues in development of media, students are then expected to undertake their own research, investigating topics covered in the module and to critically evaluate source material they choose for themselves. Students will receive regular formative feedback both from their tutor and peers on group and individual work throughout the module.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Help students gain a detailed knowledge of the field of media studies, with an appreciation for the different approaches to the study of media language from a variety of different perspectives;

    • Develop students' knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically a range of theoretical approaches to the study of media and Internet discourse, while looking at a range of text types from everyday interaction, in newspapers and magazines, and online;

    • Help students gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the study of language in the media and online has developed over time;

    • Develop students' ability to think critically about different approaches to media and Internet language and to analyse texts in structured, reflective and analytical ways;

    • Help students explain and critically evaluate significant issues in recent approaches to media and Internet language;

    • Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of resources to investigate language in media and Internet contexts, including everyday talk and interaction, literary texts, and journal articles.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Develop a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of how linguistics is used to describe and analyse media and Internet discourse;

    • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of a range of theoretical approaches to media and Internet discourse and how these theories affect methodology;

    • Understand the social contexts which can determine the interpretation of language, and the ideological implications of these contexts for constructing social identities

    • Gain a detailed knowledge of the ethical responsibilities of language use

    • Gain a detailed knowledge of a range of approaches analysis of media and Internet discourse from a variety of settings, as well as understand the appropriacy of different approaches in different settings

    • Apply in a sophisticated way a range of critical approaches to the study of media and Internet discourse, with a focus on students’ own interests, both in text types and analytic approaches;

    • Produce their own small-scale analysis of media and Internet discourse in written texts, with a focus on the applying linguistic analysis in a reliable and consistent way;

    • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of generic conventions and the effects of authorship, production, and audience for media and Internet discourse analysis, as well as understanding its usefulness in descriptions and analysis of social interaction;

    • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;

    • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy in terms of their own analysis, by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances;

    • To collaborate productively with others in research, negotiation, problem solving, writing, and presentation skills to an advanced level;

    • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Analysis of Text (4000 words)