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Forensic Psychology BSc (Hons)

Honours Degree , Full Time

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Key Details

  • 3 Years
  • 104 Typical UCAS Tariff
  • C816 Course Code
  • Full Time

Overview

Forensic Psychology is located at the intersection between Psychology and Criminology.  The discipline involves applying evidence-based practice underpinned by psychological theories to improve the experience and outcomes of individuals who come into contact with the criminal justice and penal systems.

Students on this course will explore core psychological areas, such as Biopsychology, Cognitive psychology, Developmental Psychology, Individual differences, Social psychology, and research methods alongside carefully curated criminology courses which link psychological theory to the criminal justice environment, offender behaviours and issues of forensic investigation.

Why study this course?

  • Blending strengths of Newman in Psychology and criminology
  • Forensic content threaded throughout all three years of study.
  • Learn about broader societal and psychological factors which affect criminal behaviours.

Forensic psychology is the study of human behaviour, with a particular focus on the behaviour of professionals, offenders and victims of crime. It explores a wide range of fascinating areas from how we think and how we see other people, to how children develop, how relationships are formed, and how we can help people in distress. Students will be given opportunity to apply this psychological knowledge and understanding to work within criminal contexts.  Forensic psychology offers many potential career paths, and in addition to the career opportunities usually offered by psychology, graduates from this course may expect to work in areas relating to the criminal justice system as practitioners, administrators, policy makers or researchers.  Studying forensic psychology at Newman provides you with a solid grounding in all core areas of psychology, but with particular strengths in considering how psychology is applied to the ‘real world’. Many of our lecturers have particular specialisms in applied psychology or criminology, and this gives this degree programme its distinctive approach and appeal.

What does the course cover?

During your first year of study students will be introduced to the foundations of psychology, providing an overview of the main areas of study within the discipline.  Students will also be introduced to the core skills required to succeed in studying psychology, as well as an overview of research methods and some key literature within the discipline of psychology.  Alongside this, students will learn about how psychological theory can inform our understanding of criminal behaviours.

In the second year, students will deepen their understanding of psychological research methods, as well as exploring in more depth the core core areas of social psychology, individual differences, cognitive psychology and developmental psychology while deepening their understanding of the criminal justice system.

In the final year students will conduct their own research project, exploring an area of specific interest to themselves.  Alongside this, students will explore the meta-theoretical underpinnings of the discipline, and will be offered the choice between further strengthening their understanding of forensic aspects of the discipline of psychology, or to pursue other aspects of psychology in depth.

How will I be assessed?

The forensic psychology degree programme uses a wide variety of forms of assessment, designed to help you develop a range of skills that will be invaluable in the modern professional work place. The assessment strategy for the degree includes traditional essays, exams, short notes and multiple ­choice tests. Also included in the strategy are less traditional assessments, such as designing a web page, Power Point presentations, writing dialogues and presenting portfolios. Finally, there are a variety of assessments linked to research, which include writing reports, giving conference style presentations, and writing a dissertation.

What careers could I consider?

The forensic psychology degree programme at Newman University is specifically aimed at preparing students to work with professionals, offenders and victims of crime.  However, as this programme covers all core BPS content, graduates from this course may also enter various psychological professions, including forensic, clinical, occupational, educational, counselling, health and sport psychology. Students can also pursue an academic career, and may progress into a PhD. Psychology graduates can also progress into a variety of careers, typically in people-orientated and caring roles; for example, nursing, teaching, social work, human resources, marketing, software design, health research, risk assessment, treatment, or rehabilitation. Psychology graduates must be both literate and numerate and these are skills that employers demand in the modern professional work place.

GBC

This programme is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS), and students gaining at least a lower 2nd class honours degree are eligible for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the BPS, which means you’ll have taken your first step towards becoming a professional psychologist.

Places available this September.

Call 0121 476 1181 to speak to our admissions team and secure your place today.

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Contact Details

for course specific enquiries

Entry Requirements

September 2019 Entry Requirements

You must achieve at least 104 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma; MPP at BTEC Extended Diploma) towards the total tariff.

As it is not possible to achieve 104 UCAS points through an Access course, Access Students will need 106 UCAS points. You can reach this with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 106 UCAS Points: D27-M0-P18; D124-M6-P15; D21-M12-P12; D18-M18-P9; D15-M24-P6; D12-M24-P3; D9-M36-P0.

Five GCSEs at grade 4 (or C) or above (or recognised equivalents), including English Language and Mathematics, are also required.

For applicants who are unsure that they will achieve the above UCAS tariff, Newman University offers Forensic Psychology (with Foundation Year) which enables such applicants to access a university degree via a four year route. Upon successful completion of their foundation year, students will progress to Year 1 of a named degree. Whilst not a condition of entry onto the Foundation Year, students wishing to follow particular named routes with additional entry requirements, will need to meet these requirements before they make the transition from their foundation year to year 1.

Course Fees

Fees per academic year:
Full-time Home/EU students: £9,250 *

* Fees shown are for 2019/20 academic year. The University will review tuition fees and increase fees in line with any inflationary uplift as determined by the UK Government, if permitted by law or government policy, in subsequent years of your course. It is anticipated that such increases would be linked to RPI (the Retail Price Index excluding mortgage interest payments).

Additional Costs

A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is not required for entry into this programme, although it is in many cases required by employers before students can begin their Year 2 (level 5) work placement.  Find out more about completing the DBS application form and the related additional costs.

As part of the core dissertation module students are required to produce an A0 poster. The cost of printing AO posters in the academic year 2017-18 is £8. There may also be additional costs associated with data collection depending on the research undertaken for example printing of questionnaires.

Additional Information

General Academic Regulations: Terms and Conditions for students attending our courses

 

  1. PRINCIPLES AND SKILLS IN PSYCHOLOGICAL INQUIRY AND LEARNING
    (Compulsory) pyu411
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module aims to introduce students to the scientific study of the human mind and behaviour. The core principles and skills within psychology inquiry and learning will be explored.  It aims to define psychology and provide understanding of evidence-based psychological practice, and the implications of research methodology behind the evidence base, for assessing individual sources contribution to developing knowledge. Students will be introduced to key methodologies within psychology research and explore the philosophical stance underpinning these methodologies. In addition, this module aims to identify academic skills needed to succeed in a psychology degree course and will focus on the development of ethical, legal, reflective and academic practice within psychology. Students will explore their personal development of learning through the application of psychological theories and concepts with an emphasis on developing a coherent skill set based on critical thinking and deeper understanding of empirical psychological science. Students will be given the opportunity to apply content from this module to their specific programme area through activities such as class discussions, seminar activities and readings, and individual and group work.  Implications of the module requirements for student employability will be reflected on.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Introduce students to the discipline of psychology and to its guiding scientific principles.

    • Introduce students to the key methodologies and principles of research.

    • Develop students' understanding of evidence-based practice in psychology.

    • Develop an awareness of ethical and legal practice and study within psychology.

    • Develop academic and reflective skills for personal development.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Understand key methodologies and principles of research in psychological inquiry.

    • Recognise applications and limitations of methodologies within psychology research.

    • Demonstrate ethical awareness within academic study, research and practice of psychology.

    • Apply psychological theory to your learning experience and personal development.

    • Demonstrate the application of reflective and academic skills as a means of identifying and evaluating patterns in learning behaviour and experience.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Portfolio, 2000 words

    Component 2 - 50% Examination, 2 hours

  2. FOUNDATIONS OF PSYCHOLOGY
    (Compulsory) pyu414
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module provides students with a broad introduction to the history of psychology as a scientific discipline. A number of different psychological perspectives will be introduced, for example, psychobiological, cognitive, behaviourist, psychodynamic, social constructionist, and students will be expected to apply and evaluate the application of such perspectives to important contemporary issues, such as drug addiction, violent behaviour, mental illness, etc. Research skills will be developed through the use of online databases and other library resources. Students will receive training in using e-resources such as Powerpoint and Panopto to produce presentations, and in using information resources.  Introductory consideration will be given to the research methodology underpinning the evidence base explored within the module. Implications of the module requirements for student employability will also be considered. Students will be given the opportunity to apply content from this module to their specific programme area through activities such as class discussions, seminar activities and readings, and individual and group work.  

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Provide a broad introduction to psychology as a scientific discipline.

    • Consider the historical origins of modern psychology.

    • Introduce the student to a number of theoretical approaches.

    • Illustrate how different approaches can be used to explain the same behaviour.

    • Explore key issues and debates within psychology.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Describe the important antecedents contributing to the development of contemporary Psychology. 

    • Apply psychological theories and evaluate research findings in applied contexts. 

    • Evaluate different psychological perspectives for an applied problem.  

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Audio and Video Presentation, 15 minutes

    Component 2 - 50% Exam, 2 hours

  3. APPLICATIONS OF PSYCHOLOGY
    (Compulsory) pyu412
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module offers an introduction to a range of applications in psychology and explores the various professional pathways in psychology practice. It aims to enhance knowledge of the application of psychological theory to the real world and examines the role of evidence-based practice and scientific method in guiding the work of professionals in a range of applied contexts, such as health, legal, organisational and educational settings. This module aims to develop the employability of students through an enhanced awareness of the range of available career pathways open to psychology graduates. The role of regulatory bodies such as British Psychological Society (BPS) and Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) are explored in relation to professional development and practice. Consideration will be given to the research methodology underpinning the evidence based explored within this module.   Implications of the module requirements for student employability will be reflected on.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 18.00 Independent   : 82.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Enhance knowledge of the application of psychological theory to the real world

    • Explore the various professional pathways in psychology practice.

    • Examines the role of evidence – based practice in a range of applied contexts.

    Enhance understanding of the role of British Psychological Society (BPS) and Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) for professional development and practice.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Review appropriate empirical evidence in the field of applied psychology.

    • Demonstrate knowledge of concepts, theory and research in areas of applied psychology.

    • Understand how psychological theory can relate to real-life settings.

    • Explain how psychological theory and evidence are used in professional practice.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Essay, 2000 words

  4. RESEARCH DESIGN AND ANALYSIS
    (Compulsory) pyu416
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will introduce students to the strengths, limitations and ethical issues associated with qualitative and quantitative research design. It will enable students to explore in greater depth the underlying principles and epistemological bases of both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Students will examine the key similarities and differences between these approaches, whilst appreciating the strengths and limitations of such approaches in addressing psychological research questions. Students will consider a range of data collection techniques (e.g., observations, interviews, simple experiments, and psychometric instruments) to consolidate their knowledge and experience of such methods. 

    Students will be equipped with a critical understanding of different quantitative research designs that will be considered in regard to important methodological concerns such as validity and reliability, and students will be aware of the implications of different research designs for the selection and use of different descriptive and inferential analytical techniques. Students will appreciate how appropriate descriptive quantitative analysis can be used to effectively characterise and summarize batches of data, whilst also providing them with tools for preliminary data screening and exploration. Students will develop their understanding of hypothesis testing, probability and important related concepts such as statistical significance, type 1 and type 2 errors, statistical power, estimation and confidence intervals, and how these relate to choices of research design and analytical alternatives.  Students will be introduced to the basic principles behind parametric and non-parametric statistical tests of difference, association, and correlation, and will be introduced to simple linear regression; furthermore, students will have the opportunity to conduct such analyses using appropriate statistical software.  

    General principles of qualitative design (developing research questions, interviewing, focus groups) will be explored. Students will develop their understanding of application of analysis in qualitative research by introduction to data analysis (coding). 

    Students will be given the opportunity to apply content from this module to their specific programme area through activities such as class discussions, seminar activities and readings, and individual and group work, and implications of the module requirements for student employability will be reflected on. Students will be introduced to the BPS’s current Code of Ethics and Conduct, and have the opportunity to see its application in their empirical work. The distinction between behaving ethically and legally will also be investigated.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Introduce students to quantitative methodology.

    • Introduce students to qualitative methodology.

    • Introduce students to quantitative analysis (e.g. test of difference and association).

    • Introduction to various qualitative methods (e.g. interviews, focus groups) and approaches (e.g. IPA, Grounded Theory, and Thematic Analysis).

    • Develop students' awareness of ethics in psychological research.

    • Develop students' report writing skills.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Identify and apply a range of methodologies in research design, recognizing appropriate solutions to design problems.

    • Evaluate the application of a range of methodologies in research design, draw valid interpretations from their outcomes and express an understanding of the limitations of such methodologies in research.

    • Generate hypotheses and/or research questions.

    • Undertake empirical studies involving a variety of methods of data collection.

    • Analyse, present, and evaluate data using both quantitative and qualitative methods.

    • Use evidence-based reasoning to examine practical, theoretical and ethical issues associated with the use of differing methodologies, paradigms and methods of analysis in psychology.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Report (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

  5. INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING
    (Compulsory) plu404
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module aims to equip students with the knowledge and self-management skills to make informed choices in preparing for work placement and the transition to employment or further study on graduation.  

    Learners will be provided with the opportunities to develop awareness of the workplace, identify different career and study options, recognise and articulate their own experience, accomplishments and talents and plan and implement career management strategies for the short and long term.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 12.00 Independent   : 88.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Support students in developing informed choices about the career pathways available to them, in relation to their subject choices.
    • Prepare students for work-based learning and the application / exploration of subject knowledge in the workplace.

    • Encourage students to make connections between their learning, placement choice, future job aspirations and contribution to society.

    • Enable students to build confidence in securing work placements and future employment.

    • Support students in reflecting upon their preparation for their work placement and future employment.  

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

    1. Examine how their experiences, accomplishments, and abilities relate to employer expectations.

    2. Demonstrate engagement with, and an understanding of, graduate employment pathways and employability issues relating to their own career aspirations.

    3. Research organisations for the purposes of securing a work placement.

    4. Reflect upon their learning and development.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Reflective Essay and Appendix, 2000 words

  6. THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE ENVIRONMENT
    (Compulsory) cru404
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module introduces core areas of criminology, focusing on the processes and systems which constitute criminal justice within the UK.  It aims to introduce students to varying ideas and concepts of crime and justice and the way these are socially and legally constructed.  The module will combine tutor led input on theoretical models of criminal justice with a more practice oriented introduction to the different stages, institutions and professional roles within justice systems via input from guest speakers.  Students gain an understanding of issues including prevention and management of crime, deviance and victimisation.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Introduce the Criminal Justice System in the UK including Police and court processes

    • Examine the core concepts and construction of crime and justice

    • Explore the processes of preventing and managing crime and deviance, and managing and preventing victimisation

    • Introduce some theoretical influences on the development of crime and justice policy.

     

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Demonstrate an understanding of the criminal justice system within the UK; and have a better understanding of the processes used to prevent and manage crime, deviance and victimisation

    • Gain an understanding of the broad concepts of crime and justice in Britain, showing awareness of how these are socially and legally constructed

    • Explore the way different theoretical approaches within criminology have influenced crime and justice policy

    • Discuss the processes involved within a court situation applying learning about the roles of different professionals

    Debate theoretical influences on the processes of managing crime and victimisation.

     

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Court Report (2000 words)

  7. THE PSYCHOLOGY OF CRIME
    (Compulsory) cru405
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will examine what the field of psychological theory can contribute to the multidisciplinary study of crime. It will enable students to adjust to the demands of learning at degree level, equipping them with a basic understanding of relevant concepts from the field of Psychology, Social Psychology and Developmental Psychology. This will provide students with a theoretical basis for the study of individual dimensions to deviance, criminal behaviour, offending, victimisation and desistance. Students will gain confidence in the use of language and be able to clearly define key concepts, in preparation for later research and work related learning.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Introduce students to relevant schools of psychological theory (e.g. Psychodynamic, Humanistic, Behaviourist, and Cognitive).

    • Develop students understanding of key concepts and theories in developmental and social psychology including theories of the self, personality, attachment, identity, learning, cognitive, moral and identity development, attitudes, prejudice, and aggression.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Engage in debates about the relative merits of psychological theory when seeking to understand criminal and deviant behaviour
    • Demonstrate sound knowledge of the basic underlying theoretical, conceptual and methodological frameworks within psychology, social psychology and developmental psychology
    • Evaluate and interpret that theory within the context of the criminal justice system and develop lines of argument in accordance with those frameworks.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Essay (2500 words)

  1. QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGN AND ANALYSIS
    (Compulsory) pyu511
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will consolidate and extend students’ knowledge and skills relating to quantitative research methods that were developed in PYU416. Students will extend their knowledge of simple experimental designs to more complex factorial designs involving two or more independent variables, and/or multiple dependent variables, whilst undertaking, interpreting, and reporting suitable univariate and multivariate ANOVA-based data analyses. Similarly, simple linear regression will be extended to multiple linear regression, whilst introducing partial and semi-partial correlation, and in addition to undertaking, interpreting, and reporting such analysis, students will consider the role and utility of this approach in addressing research questions. Ideas relating to factor analysis and its influence and role within psychology that were introduced in PYU416 will be extended, and students will undertake and interpret principal component analysis. Issues of reliability and validity in conjunction with factor analytic and reliability analysis will be developed in the context of psychometric assessment. Data screening and the many and complex assumptions underlying the analyses covered within this module will be considered, and students will use appropriate techniques to evaluate the extent to which such assumptions have been met. Throughout the module, students will have the opportunity to see how these analytical methods are presented and utilized in contemporary psychological literature. Students will also have the opportunity to further reflect on the BPS’s latest Code of Ethics and Conduct, and explore the distinction between ethical and legal practice. 

    Students will be given the opportunity to apply content from this module to their specific programme area through activities such as class discussions, seminar activities and readings, and individual and group work.  Additionally, implications of the module requirements for student employability will be reflected on.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 76.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Develop and enhance students’ knowledge of quantitative research design & analysis.

    • Enhance students’ data screening and manipulation skills.

    • Introduce and extend a student’s quantitative method and analytical repertoire.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Relate analytical approaches to theoretical perspectives and key debates in Psychology

    • Identify and apply advanced methodologies in research design, recognizing appropriate solutions to design problems.

    • Critically evaluate the application of a range of methodologies in research design, draw valid interpretations from their outcomes and express an understanding of the limitations of such methodologies in both personal research and that of other researchers.

    • Generate hypotheses and/or research questions.

    • Analyse, present, and evaluate data using quantitative methods.

    • Use evidence-based reasoning to examine practical and theoretical implications associated with the use of differing quantitative approaches and methods of analysis in psychology.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Examination (2 hours)

  2. WORK PLACEMENT
    (Compulsory) plu502
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 10.00 Independent   : 90.00 Placement   : 100.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement in a workplace setting.

    • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement and of their independent learning throughout the experience.

    • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.

    • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.

    • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to: 

    1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.

    2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.

    3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.

    4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

     

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - PLACEMENT REGISTRATION FORM

    Component 2 - 60% WORK PLACEMENT REFLECTION (2500 WORDS)

    Component 3 - 40% WORK PLACEMENT EVALUATION: DIGITAL RESOURCE (1500 WORDS EQUIVALENT)

  3. THE INDIVIDUAL IN SOCIETY
    (Compulsory) pyu513
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    In this module, students will be introduced to key concepts, issues and studies within the fields of social psychology and individual differences.  Examples of the breadth and depth of issues which students may explore include attitudes, attribution, intelligence, inter-group behaviour, Intelligence, Personality, Prejudice and Discrimination, Personality, and Social Influence. Issues of measurement and testing, including psychometric testing, reliability, validity and usage will be explored.  Students will explore both classic social psychological and individual differences approaches to these phenomenon, as well as looking at recent research, debates, and developments within the field.  Students will be given the opportunity to apply content from this module to their specific programme area through activities such as class discussions, seminar activities and readings, and individual and group work. Consideration will be given to the research methodology underpinning the evidence based explored within this module. Implications of the module requirements for student employability will be reflected on throughout the module.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Develop a critical understanding of the subject areas of social psychology and individual differences.

    • Develop a critical knowledge and understanding of theories & psychological approaches relevant to the Individual in Society.

    • Evaluate psychological explanations for social, interpersonal & intra-personal phenomena.

    • Be able to apply psychological theories and research to contemporary social issues.

    • Evaluate the utility of psychometric testing as applied to the real world. 

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Critically evaluate the main theoretical perspectives, debates and examples of key research evidence in the field of Psychology.

    • Discuss the extent to which psychological theories can explain, or provide solutions to, contemporary events or issues.

    • Employ evidence-based reasoning to examine practical, theoretical and ethical issues associated with the use of differing methodologies, paradigms and methods of analysis in psychology.

    • Analyse and evaluate a range of key research evidence in the field of social psychology and individual differences, including the application of a range of research methodologies.

    • Generate and explore hypotheses and research questions. 

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Report (2000 words)

  4. QUALITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGN AND ANALYSIS
    (Compulsory) pyu520
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will build on foundation level modules to further enhance knowledge and understanding of qualitative methods and analysis. It will focus on various approaches within qualitative psychological research (e.g IPA, Discourse Analysis and Thematic Analysis) appreciating the strengths, limitations and the philosophical assumptions underlying each approach. It will enable students to consider how research questions are developed and how these inform the choice of the method. Students will have the opportunity to conduct a qualitative study, gain the experience of collecting qualitative data, and explore the research process within qualitative inquiry (devising an interview schedule, conducting one-to-one semi-structured interviews, recording data, transcription of qualitative data). Students will develop their understanding of application of Thematic Analysis in qualitative research, as well as develop their ability to analyse textual data (code, coding, and developing themes). Topics, where possible, will make theoretical links with other modules running concurrently; enabling students to apply qualitative report writing skills in future research projects. Furthermore, students will continue to explore the important distinctions between ethical and legal practice. 

    Students will be given the opportunity to apply content from this module to their specific programme area through activities such as class discussions, seminar activities and readings, and individual and group work. 

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 76.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Further develop knowledge of qualitative research methodology and analysis.

    • Enhance understanding of the research process within qualitative inquiry.

    • Enhance understanding of ethical issues within qualitative psychological research.

    • Enhance understanding of qualitative data analysis and interpretation.

    • Enhance research qualitative report writing skills.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Understand and evaluate relevant research evidence. 

    • Formulate a relevant research question and set it in the context of existing literature.

    • Carry out appropriate qualitative data collection methods and understand the ethical considerations relating to qualitative psychology research.

    • Analyse qualitative data and draw appropriate conclusions from the research study.

    • Recognise the theoretical, practical and methodological implications and limitations of a qualitative research.

    • Evidence competence in planning and writing reports.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Report (2000 words)

  5. PSYCHOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
    (Compulsory) cru508
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will develop students’ knowledge and deepen their understanding of the psychological underpinnings of the criminal justice environment and the various actors who come within its ambit. A key theme running through the module will be on the insights that forensic psychology can offer on explaining decision-making in various contexts, on the part of victims, offenders, juries, agencies and professionals associated with criminal justice and its operation in practice. It will also explore the critical importance of public attitudes towards crime, punishment and the Criminal Justice System, and will address important themes such as the rehabilitation of offenders and factors related to desistance from offending.      

    No information provided. Please inform the Quality Office of the text to be included within this section.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Expand students’ understanding of how insights from forensic psychology can explain decision-making by key actors in the criminal justice environment, including the police, jurors, probation service and sentencers;
    • Stimulate students’ critical awareness of crime and mental disorder, and the concept of ‘dangerousness’;
    • Engage students with topical debates related to the psychology of terrorism and violence, vulnerable persons in the CJS, coercive control and desistance.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Investigate and reflect upon the efficacy of forensic psychological expertise in the assessment, treatment and management of offenders within the Criminal Justice System;

    • Appreciate the significance of public confidence and trust in the Criminal Justice System and psychological factors that influence this;

    • Select, study and present a relevant case study to demonstrate their learning and critical reflections.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 60% Critical Essay (2500 words)

    Component 2 - 40% Individual Poster Presentation (10 minutes, 1500 words equivalent)

  6. COGNITION AND THE BRAIN
    (Compulsory) pyu515
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module covers the key processes associated with cognition as well as the biological and neurological underpinnings of such cognitive processes. The module also introduces cognitive psychology as a specific approach to understanding behaviour with its emphasis on theoretically led hypothesis and the experimental testing of these hypotheses to further develop theory. Additionally, consideration will be given to the research methodology underpinning the evidence based explored within this module. The module will provide depth in knowledge in the cognitive and biological aspects of psychology including understanding the principles of neuronal transmission, basic neuroanatomy, basic psychopharmacology, key cognitive processes such as memory, perception, attention, and language, and how neuropsychological functioning relates to cognitive processing. The empirical component of this module will require students to consider and apply the latest BPS’s Code of Ethics and Conduct. Students will be given the opportunity to apply content from this module to their specific programme area through activities such as class discussions, seminar activities and readings, and individual and group work, and implications of the module requirements for student employability will be reflected on. 

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Build on students’ theoretical knowledge of psychology through a consideration of the rapidly developing fields of cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience and psychophysiology.

    • Develop a critical awareness of where the disciplines of cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience and psychophysiology stand in a historical, academic and professional context.

    • Consolidate students’ awareness of the biological and neurological approach to cognition.

    • Evaluate and examine the theoretical models which attempt to predict and explain cognitive processes and examine the practical application of these models and processes in experimental situations and everyday life.

    • Provide students with a thorough grounding in key cognitive processes such as, attention, perception, memory and how these processes can be affected by factors such as language, sleep, stress, mood and anxiety.

    • Raise students’ awareness and understanding of the automatic or non-conscious cognitive processes and how they affect our perception and judgment.

    • Facilitate the development of critical appraisal skills in evaluating cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience and psychophysiology research.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Illustrate a sound knowledge and critical awareness of the core concepts, theories, models, and research within cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience and psychophysiology and apply this to current topics.

    • Demonstrate an in depth knowledge and understanding of how cognitive and biological concepts can aid understanding of key phenomena such as attention, perception, memory, language, sleep, and stress.

    • Employ critical knowledge and understanding of cognitive and biological concepts to develop and conduct an empirical study in the domain.

    • Demonstrate the ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing, and sustained argument, using a range of primary sources in cognitive and biological psychology, and use it to evaluate alternative arguments in cognitive and biological psychology.

    • Demonstrate a systematic understanding of cognitive and biological psychology theory, methods, and research especially through the design and execution of an empirical study.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Report (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

  7. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT: AN ETHOLOGICAL APPROACH
    (Compulsory) pyu516
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module builds upon the first year course and particularly the modules PYU414 Foundations of Psychology and PYU416 Research Design and Analysis. Developmental Psychology is generally viewed as one of several core areas in the discipline. This module, however, suggests that developmental psychology must be viewed as something more important and pervasive: All areas of the study of human existence can only be fully understood if a developmental perspective is adopted in the sense that all behaviour develops either by evolution (phylogeny) or during the lifespan of the organism (ontogeny). Furthermore, this module places developmental psychology in the wider context of studying the human condition by exploring not only the phylogeny and ontogeny of behaviour and thought but also their function (and dysfuction) and mechanism.  Students will be given the opportunity to apply content from this module to their specific programme area through activities such as class discussions, seminar activities, which provide formative feedback that directly leads into the summative feedback of the examination, and readings, and individual and group work.  The module is fully complemented by auditory and visual aids, including the use of Panopto recordings. Consideration will be given to the research methodology underpinning the evidence based explored within the area this module explores by means of critical reviews of research papers, Implications of the module requirements for student employability will be reflected on.

     Students will be given the opportunity to apply content from this module to their specific programme area through activities such as class discussions, seminar activities and readings, and individual and group work.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Develop critical understanding of the complexities of development including attachment, cognition, language, socialisation and enculturation from infancy through childhood to adolescence and adulthood.

    • Enable students to critically evaluate the principle theories and research paradigms offered in explanation of human development.

    • Develop students’ understanding of the benefits of the complementary nature of an ethological approach to understanding human psychology by exploring the evolution, development, mechanism and function of thinking and behaviour and how such an approach may impact on current research questions and approaches.

    • Further students’ knowledge of the nature and nurture account of human development and the likely interaction between these two ends of a continuum of explanation.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of aspects of human behaviour and experience in relation to, for example: social development, social perception and social influence, and how psychological theories relate to and/or might explain this.

    • Evidence understanding of the nature of socialisation in childhood, adolescence and adulthood and appraise factors involved in the process of social development.

    • Analyse the impact of developmental changes on children’s learning and acquisition of knowledge.

    • Appraise distinctive theoretical stances in developmental psychology and their influence on interpretation of research findings.

    • Deconstruct and critique a research project that examines a particular aspect of development and to draw appropriate inferences about the nature of research design and analyses.

    • Evidence the ability to consider and critically evaluate alternative arguments in relation to developmental change.

    • Consider ethical issues related to research with children and adolescents and demonstrate an understanding of the British Psychological Society guidelines

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Critique of an Empirical Paper (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

  1. (Compulsory)
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  2. PSYCHOLOGY IN QUESTION
    (Compulsory) pyu612
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This course will introduce students to a number of controversies, conceptual issues, and philosophical debates in contemporary psychology.  Students will be introduced to competing philosophical perspectives within psychology, and will explore how the philosophical stance adopted by psychologists may affect their assumptions about the nature of psychological phenomenon.  Student will explore how this in turn may affect the kinds of knowledge which may be produced or uncovered. Students will engage with issues concerning the conceptual reliability of validity of psychological research, including grappling with what the core aims of psychology as a discipline are, how well psychology may be addressing these aims, how psychology as a discipline has changed and developed over time, and how psychology could be different. Students will be given the opportunity to apply content from this module to their specific programme area through activities such as class discussions, seminar activities and readings, and individual and group work.  Consideration will be given to the research methodology underpinning the evidence based explored within this module. Implications of the module requirements for student employability will be reflected on.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Develop a critical understanding of the nature of psychology.

    • Critically engage with the nature of psychological objects including considering alternative forms of psychology (such as be asking the question 'how else could psychology be?').

    • Be able to critically evaluate psychology as a discipline, in the same way that we evaluate psychological research.

    • Demonstrate an appreciation of the relationship between the epistemological position taken, and the production of knowledge within psychology.

    • Defend psychological studies, methodologies, epistemologies and findings against critiques by others. 

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the influence of theoretical perspectives in the creation, collection and interpretation of empirical data. 

    • Critically compare multiple epistemological and / or ontological perspectives within psychology. 

    • Make critical judgements and evaluations, identifying general principles and evaluating competing perspective.

    • Evidence the ability to use research techniques to explore an issue or controversy within psychology.

    • Show the ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence.

    • Make critical judgements and evaluations, identifying general principles and evaluating competing perspectives. 

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Essay, 2000 words

    Component 2 - 50% Report, 2000 words

  3. (Optional)
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  4. CRITICAL ISSUES IN FORENSIC INVESTIGATION
    (Compulsory) cru607
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will develop students’ knowledge and deepen their understanding of key investigative processes and techniques utilised in various forensic contexts.  It will integrate selected relevant theoretical perspectives from the field of forensic psychology with critical insights from applied criminology and policing studies.  A key reference point for the module will be Smith and Flanagan’s seminal (2000) Home Office research report, The Effective Detective: identifying the skills of an effective SIO.     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Develop students’ critical understanding of how psychological knowledge can assist in the prevention of flawed evidence gathering and potential miscarriages of justice;

    • Enable students to critically assess the usefulness and limitations of tools designed to assist with eye witness identification and lie detection;

    • Promote critical reflection on the skillset one requires to develop as an effective investigative practitioner;

    • Engage students in the practical application of investigative interview techniques.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Critically assess factors that make evidence reliable;   

    • Explain how knowledge of forensic psychological perspectives can help in obtaining evidence from witnesses and suspects;

    • Assess the utility and validity of the polygraph as an investigative tool 

    • Produce an ‘expert witness’ portfolio to demonstrate their learning and critical reflections. 

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% PORTFOLIO (4500 WORDS)

  5. CRIME, PLACE AND SPACE
    (Optional) cru605
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will engage students in a detailed conceptual analysis of crime, space and place. Crime needs to be understood in relation to the private and public spaces in which it is located, such as the home, urban environments, rural environments, the school, shopping malls, parks, the prison, the street, neighbourhoods, and council estates. The module will explore how (and by whom) spaces are controlled and how this leads to perceptions within communities as to how to behave. Spaces (such as neighbourhoods) can become privatised, gentrified, gendered and racialised, leading to disproportionate policing and criminalisation. Students will critically examine how systems designed to reduce crime and provide safety in certain spaces – e.g. surveillance, affect criminal behaviour and people living in, or travelling through those spaces. Students will be encouraged take an ethnographic approach to understand the interaction between crime, place and space by exploring a real life space and relating this to theoretical frames.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Critically examine the concepts of place and space in relation to crime and criminal justice.

    • Explore how spaces become racialised, gendered and ghettoised and how this is related to crime.

    • Critically discuss the impact of privatisation and gentrification on urban spaces.

    • Explain and explore ethnographic approaches to understanding the relationship of space and crime.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Critically evaluate the relationship of crime space and criminal justice.

    • Understand the power relations underlying the symbolic boundaries of space.

    • Conduct a small scale ethnographic study critically examining the construction of space in relation to crime and criminal justice.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Individual Visual Ethnographic Project (4000 word equivalent)

  6. YOUNG PEOPLE AND CRIME
    (Optional) cru609
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module critically examines a range of criminological theory, both historical and contemporary, that seeks to explain why young people commit crime and how it has and continues to inform governmental responses to youth crime. This will include some discussion of current policy and legislation and an analysis of structures within the British Criminal Justice System (focusing on England and Wales) such as Youth Offending Teams. Particular focus will be on how young peoples’ criminal behaviour is interpreted and contested in the media and political discourses and how youth crime policy impacts disproportionately on certain groups of young people within society (e.g. black young people, young people who meet on the street, etc.). A recurrent theme will be how current models of work with young people involved in crime and multi-professional efforts to bring about desistance from that behaviour may conflict with the workers reluctance to engage in social control.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Introduce students to fundamental concepts in criminology, looking at how these have developed over time in relation to young people, and how they can be applied to practice,
    • Analyse the legal framework around young people and crime (including the Criminal Justice System), the rationales behind its structure and young people’s experience of it,
    • Critically reflect on current discourse, policy and practice around young people and crime,
    • Introduce students to the skills, knowledge and understanding needed to work within the Youth Justice system.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Examine and critically appraise a range of theories which seek to explain youth crime         
    • Consider a range of responses and strategies designed to bring about desistance from crime
    • Hear visiting speakers from the youth justice field sharing their experiences of working with young offenders
    • Articulate a coherent personal position on the effectiveness of current policy responses to youth crime
    • Understand how those policy responses impact on a diverse range of young people.

     

    And demonstrate that he/she

     

    • Critically understands contexts  in which youth justice professionals are employed including the distinctive cultures of youth offending teams and multi-agency approaches
    • Understands and can articulate their role as youth justice practitioners in relation to other professionals in the criminal justice system
    • Can organise and articulate of opinions and arguments in speech and writing, including justifying a personal position in relation to the subject.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% ESSAY, 3000 WORDS

  7. COMPARATIVE CRIMINAL JUSTICE
    (Optional) cru603
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module seeks to broaden students’ comparative understanding of criminal justice by locating it in an international context.  Using selected focal topics, it will heighten critical awareness of different models in use in responding to crime, deviance, victims and harm.

    It will draw on examples from a number of comparator jurisdictions which may include Scotland, The Netherlands, China, Japan and the United States.  Students will be encouraged to access independently international source material in order to prepare a presentation and brief for a Justice Minister on a selected topic.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 24.00 Independent : 176.00 Placement : Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    •  Develop critical analysis in assessing the merits and limitations of competing perspectives on crime and justice system responses
    •  Place in comparative and transnational contexts key debates in respect of human rights in relation to treatment of offenders and victims
    •  Provide students with the opportunity to research, execute and present independently research material in appropriate formats

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Engage in debates about the efficacy of different jurisdictional response to crime, deviance and victims

    • Critically assess the human rights and public protection benefits of differing approaches to crime control and punishment, and place these in their political and social contexts

    • Work autonomously and with others, recognising the ethical implications of their research and enquiry

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 25% Presentation/Debate (20 minutes)

    Component 2 - 75% Brief (2500 words)

  8. EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
    (Optional) cru604
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will provide the basis for students to critically examine the relationship between crime, the criminal justice system and the increasingly fluid and intersectional social categories of ‘race’, culture, religion, gender, and sexuality. Using national and international contemporary theoretical perspectives, students will examine how these can aid explanation of crime in late modern Britain. Through their own reflective writing and the use of a range of visual methods/resources, students will be challenged to critically evaluate how they as potential practitioners are situated within structures of power and how their own inhabiting of multiple identities will be implicated in their efforts to challenge the inequalities that persist within the criminal justice system.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Critically examine how discourses of difference permeate criminal justice.

    • Critically evaluate how theoretical frames such as Feminism, Critical Race Theory and Intersectionality inform the study of criminology.

    • Enable students to recognise how they are located within these discourses as individuals with their own biographical experiences and multiple identities.

    • Enable students to explore how their own professional practice can challenge hegemonic power relations as they manifest in criminal justice.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Analyse film, theatre and ethno-dramatic portrayals of crime.

    • Hear visiting speakers from within the professional and local communities.

    • Examine their own and others different experiences and perceptions of crime.

    • Research and articulate a coherent position on the operation of inequality within criminal justice.

    • Research and articulate how their own subjectivity shapes their perception of crime and criminal offenders.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Auto Ethnographic Essay (3000 words)

  9. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY: THE LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT OF TYPICAL AND ATYPICAL YOUNG PEOPLE
    (Optional) pyu616
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module builds upon the second year module Human Development: An Ethological Approach (PYU516) and applies an understanding of contextualised development in an educational setting. Educational Psychology explores various and seemingly discrete issues associated with the dynamic between teaching and learning. These issues include the qualities of a good teacher, the environment of the classroom, the form and function of assessment, diversity and the use of blended approaches to teaching and learning. This module also affords students the opportunity to work in groups to ascertain various pragmatic issues that may confront practicing educational psychologists in the field. Consideration will be given to the research methodology underpinning the evidence based explored within the area this module explores by means of critical reviews of research papers Implications of the module requirements for student employability will be reflected on.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Advance understanding of research methodologies and psychological theories that inform educational practice.

    • Enhance knowledge of the ways in which student diversity can impact upon teaching and learning.

    • Further develop the ability to evaluate current research evidence offered in explanation of approaches to teaching and learning.

    • Advance the ability to appraise different methods of assessment.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Critically evaluate ways in which psychological research and theories have been applied to educational practice.

    • Assess the implications of psychological research for improving the effectiveness of teaching and learning.

    • Appraise the impact of culture, community, individuality and uniqueness on learning.

    • Compare and evaluate different types of student assessment, both formative and summative,  and how good quality assessments must be valid measurements of ability that provide information and feedback not only for the assessor but also those being assessed.

    • Write an informed critique on a piece of psychological research that pertains to teaching and learning.

    • Show the ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence.

    • Evaluate primary source material critically

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Critique (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)