Liberal Arts BA (Hons)

, Full-Time

Key Details

  • 3 Years
  • 96 Typical UCAS Tariff
  • Y100 Course Code
student studying

Overview

This course is planned to start in September 2020. 

Are you interested in society? In social justice? In what it means to be human? In the big ideas that have motivated people throughout history and throughout the world? If so, Newman University’s BA in Liberal Arts is the right degree for you. Beginning in September 2020, Newman’s BA in Liberal Arts combines the subject areas of Drama, English and Creative Writing, History, Theology and Philosophy. It provides depth and breadth by offering modules on the ancient origins of contemporary ideas; on how we remember traumas such as slavery, war and holocaust; on the impact of science; on how we create virtues and values, and how we make political and economic decisions. It is not a subject-specific discipline but the application of disciplined knowledge to real-world problems.

Why study Liberal Arts?

BA Liberal Arts aims to enable you to develop subject knowledge and a broad cultural understanding by encouraging you to explore different disciplines. It is a flexible course allowing you to tailor your learning according to your own interests.

By studying a broad degree, you will gain a wide range of skills such as problem-solving, critical thinking, collaboration and communication. Liberal Arts also prepares you for the rapidly-changing economic climate by enabling you to make connections between different ideas and concepts. This ability to understand and engage with complexity will prepare you for graduate employment in an increasingly complex world.

  • Liberal Arts at Newman has  a focus on humanity, ethics and social justice, meaning you will study a coherent interdisciplinary course focused on making a difference.
  • You may also choose to study abroad at Newman University in Wichita, USA and to take part in educational outreach work in The Gambia.
  • You will undertake a work placement of your choice in your second year, boosting your employability and helping you make the step into graduate employment.
  • You will take part in various practical activities, such as the organisation of debates and participation in undergraduate conferences and individual research projects, which will help you to develop new skills.
  • You will benefit from small class sizes that promote debate and discussion, as well as tutorials to boost your understanding and development.
  • Your personal tutor will support you throughout your degree.

What does the course cover?

Each year, you will take compulsory Liberal Arts modules and combine these with additional modules from the Arts and Humanities department. There is a core programme at in the first year and optionality is introduced in the second year, allowing you to choose modules on religion, politics, philosophy and drama throughout the entire programme.

In your first year of study you will have a broad introduction to the Liberal Arts in which you will look at the idea of democracy from the classical world onwards, and you will question the role of memory in a liberal democracy: what do we remember, what do we forget, and why? This year will also include a module to foster independent learning skills, and core modules in cognate disciplines.

In the second year you will study film as a medium and will question how cultural identity, including gender, race, class and nationality, is expressed through film. In this year you will also examine some of the major developments in our understanding of modern science and will develop an awareness of the philosophical and theological assumptions underpinning scientific approaches to knowledge and meaning. You will also undertake a reflective work placement to develop graduate-level skills; in addition you may choose to spend part of this second year studying with our partner institution Newman University in Wichita, Kansas, USA. Finally, you will begin to prepare for your dissertation or independent research project.

In the final year you will explore the political, social and cultural function of minority persecution and the modern concept of genocide. Students will then use this understanding to consider more recent genocides and to assess critically the twentieth-century definition of genocide.  The final taught module explores the ruin as a cultural trope. Using a diverse range of case studies you will analyse how ruined places are understood by the people who encounter and write about them and you will be encouraged to make connections between these ruins and your own experiences of ruins as you meet them in your everyday life.  In this year you will also write a dissertation or conduct a research or practice-based project.  This is an extended piece of independent research which you will write under the guidance of supervisors.

How will I be assessed?

There will be a wide range of assessment methods based largely upon a combination of written work (essays and reports) and presentations (group and individual). Depending on the optional modules you choose, the assessment methods could also include reflective journals, reviews and examinations or even a research bid. The dissertation is assessed by an extended piece of writing (10,000 words) or a practice-based research project.

What careers could I consider?

Graduates can expect to have many different careers in their lives and so a degree which emphasises adaptability, resilience and a range of skills is now vital. BA Liberal Arts prepares you for a variety of roles, with the strong social justice element being especially important for the charity sector, social care, education or humanitarian work. Throughout Europe Liberal Arts graduates primarily go on to develop careers in research, policy advice and education. You will also be well-suited for positions in the arts, heritage, marketing, business and the public sector, and for postgraduate study or research.

Open Days 2019

Start your Newman journey at one of our upcoming Open Days:

Saturday 12th October 2019, 10am-3pm

Friday 8th November 2019, 4pm-8pm

Book Your Place

Contact Details

for course specific enquiries

Entry Requirements

You must achieve at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma; MPP at BTEC Extended Diploma) towards the total tariff.

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9-M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

Five GCSEs at grade 4 (or C) or above including English Language, (or recognised equivalents) are also required. You must also have an A Level (or equivalent) in a humanities/social sciences related subject.

Course Fees

Fees per academic year:
Full-time UK/EU students: £9,250 *

* Fees shown are for 2020/21 academic year. The University will review tuition fees and increase fees in line with any inflationary uplift as determined by the UK Government, if permitted by law or government policy, on enrolment and in subsequent years of your course. It is anticipated that such increases would be linked to RPI (the Retail Price Index excluding mortgage interest payments).

Additional Costs

Students who wish to study abroad will incur additional costs.

Find out more about the other additional costs associated with our undergraduate degrees. 

 

Additional Information

General Academic Regulations: Terms and Conditions for students attending our courses

  1. THE LIBERAL ARTS: DRAMA AND DEMOCRACY
    (Compulsory) lau401
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will introduce students to what Liberal Arts is and what it means to study this subject at university. Students will study Greek drama, exploring the historical context of the plays as well as exploring the plays as dramatic presentations through performance. Through their study of Greek drama, students will also be given guidance on essential study skills for studying the Liberal Arts at university, e.g. essay writing, referencing.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 48.00 Independent   : 152.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Equip students with the tools and techniques to practise Liberal Arts, especially in the areas of Classical Civilisations, History and Drama

    • Be explicit about the behaviours and competences expected of students on a university-level academic Humanities course.

    • Explore the study of ancient literature

    • Introduce students to the theoretical underpinnings of academic study of ancient literature and its performance

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Identify, analyse and evaluate ancient dramatic texts with a secure understanding of the relevant context

    • Understand and critically evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the past and to approaching the performance of ancient texts

    • Construct arguments in written form

    • Gather and retrieve written and other materials for use in study from library, electronic and other repositories

    • Critically interpret both ancient literature and secondary literature on the subject, including the work of historians, Classicists and those working on the theory and practice of drama

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Dramatic Presentation Individual (10 minutes) or Small Groups (15 minutes)

  2. READING IDENTITY POLITICS
    (Compulsory) enu419
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module will introduce students to the basic concepts, terminology, and politics of exploring identity in cultural texts. Through studying excerpts from popular critical commentaries on theories of gender, sexuality, race, disability, and class, students will develop skills in textual and cultural analysis, establishing an introductory critical vocabulary that will be developed and refined in subsequent levels of the programme. Students will acquire knowledge of the history of cultural representations of identities and explore the extent to which these discourses are revisited and redressed in contemporary popular texts (fiction, film, television, music video, drama etc.) The first part of the module focuses on applying accessible critical commentaries on feminism, queer studies, postcolonialism, disability studies, and Marxism to popular cultural case studies. The second part of the module introduces students to an early modern play in preparation for a theatre trip to the RSC to see the play in performance. Students are then assessed via a portfolio including a critical review of the production and a supporting annotated bibliography on an identity-themed topic. Formative feedback opportunities on writing reviews and annotated bibliographies will be offered as part of the seminar workshop teaching sessions.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 44.00 Independent   : 156.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Introduce students to a range of contemporary critical texts about cultural representation and identity politics, and a case study of a contemporary performance of an early modern play

    • Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the ideological and ethical issues in the representation of identities in contemporary culture

    • Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of a range of contexts (historical, social, economic, political) for exploring the construction of identities in text and culture

    • Enable students to develop the ability to write coherently and in a structured way about cultural identity politics, recognising and commenting ethically on key features of identity construction in cultural texts

    • Develop students’ ability to use secondary critical resources in both digital and hard copy form to help them develop their understanding of key theoretical perspectives in relation to identity

    • To help students develop effective habits of independent study, taking responsibility for their own learning and their own perspectives on identities in culture, through carefully structured and supported activities.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Gain an introductory knowledge of a range of critical/theoretical texts in relation to contemporary identity politics

    • Gain a basic knowledge of the historical, cultural, political, economic, and social contexts in which these texts – and an early modern play – are produced

    • Gain an introductory knowledge of the ways in which theory/criticism can be applied to textual/cultural examples of identity construction

    • Develop their critical skills in close reading and analysis of texts

    • Develop their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation

    • Gain some knowledge and understanding of the role and responsibility of authors and readers in making meanings from cultural representations

    • Demonstrate literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured and appropriate to the assignment brief

    • Develop their research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material

    • Develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performance

    • Provide opportunities to practice the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required by employers.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (3500 words)

  3. POLITICS AND RELIGION IN BRITAIN
    (Compulsory) thu412
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module explores the role of religion and politics in Britain by bringing classical texts of political philosophy into dialogue with real case studies from the recent past. You will become familiar with key concepts that have influenced how religion is understood in Britain today. Arguments about religious toleration, individual freedom, and the role of the state have real consequences for how people live and so over the course of this module you’ll analyse how these abstract political concepts play out in our contemporary world.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • provide a coherent learning in Religious Studies and Political Philosophy, as they pertain to Britain in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries;

    • foster in students an academically rigorous and critical approach to the study of Politics and Religion;

    • engage students with the current role(s) of religion in British politics and public life;

    • enable students to conduct an empathetic and critical awareness of the complexity of the connection between religion and politics in Britain in order to deepen their understanding of contemporary society and the ongoing relevance of the study of religion;

    • support students as they develop knowledge of themselves, their own learning and their understanding of justice

    • equip students with the communication and IT skills necessary to express complex information in a coherent and cogent manner

    • provide students with opportunities to gain the transferable and employability skills to enable them to pursue their life ambitions.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Describe and explain some fundamental positions in political philosophy as it pertains to religion.

    • Apply these abstract concepts to specific situations, drawing on personal experience and case studies.

    • Analyse case studies, deploying concepts from political philosophy to examine the role of religion in contemporary Britain.

    • Evaluate the claims of key religious and political actors in British society, situating them within the wider social and historical context of religion and politics.

       

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 60% Collection of Short Essays (1500 words)

    Component 2 - 40% Group Presentation (10 minutes, 1500 word equivalent)

  4. REMEMBERING AND FORGETTING: MEMORY STUDIES IN A LIBERAL DEMOCRACY
    (Compulsory) lau402
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Nobody really understands what memory is. Despite this, memory is fundamental to our lives as human beings, our interactions with others, and our sense of who we are as people. Engaging with the diverse and peculiar ways that people have tried to explain their memory to themselves, this module will explore one of the fundamental questions facing human beings: what does it mean to remember?

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Introduce students to the topic of remembering as it applies to the disciplines of the Humanities;

    • Enable students to reflect on how different ways of remembering shape their own experience of the world;

    • Explore similarities and differences in the ways that remembering is modelled and understood in the Humanities disciplines.

    • Apply a range of perspectives to engage with the central questions around remembering and forgetting.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Describe different models of remembering as they are applied in different disciplines.    

    • Demonstrate how different models of remembering can be used applied to human culture and behaviour.

    • Draw on theories of remembering to analyse primary sources.

    • Evaluate the role of remembering in contemporary society, weigh its use as a tool of critique and reflect ethically on the nature of memory.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Group Presentation (15 minutes, 2000 word equivalent)

    Component 2 - 50% Peer Assessment (2000 word equivalent)

  5. INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING
    (Compulsory) plu404
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module aims to equip students with the knowledge and self-management skills to make informed choices in preparing for work placement and the transition to employment or further study on graduation.  

    Learners will be provided with the opportunities to develop awareness of the workplace, identify different career and study options, recognise and articulate their own experience, accomplishments and talents and plan and implement career management strategies for the short and long term.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 12.00 Independent   : 88.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Support students in developing informed choices about the career pathways available to them, in relation to their subject choices.
    • Prepare students for work-based learning and the application / exploration of subject knowledge in the workplace.

    • Encourage students to make connections between their learning, placement choice, future job aspirations and contribution to society.

    • Enable students to build confidence in securing work placements and future employment.

    • Support students in reflecting upon their preparation for their work placement and future employment.  

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

    1. Examine how their experiences, accomplishments, and abilities relate to employer expectations.

    2. Demonstrate engagement with, and an understanding of, graduate employment pathways and employability issues relating to their own career aspirations.

    3. Research organisations for the purposes of securing a work placement.

    4. Reflect upon their learning and development.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Reflective Essay and Appendix, 2000 words

  6. CHALLENGING THE CANON
    (Compulsory) enu416
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module introduces students to the notion of canonical literature and then considers the ways in which contemporary authors have ‘written back’ to specific canonical works and to what effect. The first teaching weeks will introduce students to the notion of the literary canon, its usefulness, limitations, relativity and Western bias. Students will study a pair of exemplar texts – a canonical novel (hypotext) alongside a ‘transformative text’ (hypertext) – and through these consider questions of literary form, genre, value, authorship as well as relevant shifts in critical movements, such as structuralism to poststructuralism. In the second half of the module, students will choose their own textual pairing for a group presentation project in which they will be asked to examine similar questions through their own research and analysis. The module aims to develop students’ ability to study independently and reduce their reliance on transmission models of learning. This will include researching around a topic, working collaboratively with peers, developing their self-efficacy by promoting their capabilities to approach tasks as challenges to be mastered, and understanding ‘setbacks’ as opportunities to target set. Formative feedback will be built into in-class workshops and delivered through regular project group tutorials.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 76.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Start to help students to think critically about how literature is categorised, evaluated and valued in changing historical and socio-political contexts

    • Develop students’ analytical and criticality skills through the comparison of related literary works

    • Introduce students to relevant selected critical concepts and their applications

    • Develop independent research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate, interpret and synthesise complex information from diverse sources

    • Develop skills for collaborative learning and working

    • Enable students to start to identify the attributes, skills and approaches developed through study in the Humanities and valued by employers

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Group Presentation & Written Evaluation (5 minutes per student, plus 750 words)

  7. READING FILM
    (Compulsory) enu406
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will introduce critical skills in reading visual texts, undertaking formal and stylistic interpretations, and beginning to make social and theoretical analyses of films. It will develop skills in interpreting visual texts and applications of theories of cultural identity in ENU419. In the first part of the module, students are introduced to rudimentary concepts related to narrative theory, in order to think about the similarities between film and prose narrative in relation to narrative structure, narrative perspective and point of view but also the different ways in which these are controlled and directed in film. This will entail work on the ‘grammar’ and vocabulary of film, the Hollywood continuity system and how it organises space and time through the elements of mise-en-scene:  iconography, camera framing, editing and sound. Students will focus on the close analysis of one Hollywood film, for example Twilight, and then learn how to compose their own film script, using the Hollywood model. In the second part of the module, students are encouraged to see textual analysis as part of a wider consideration of cultural history. They will consider how cinema can be self-reflexive, often working to deconstruct the rigid ideological structures of the Hollywood continuity system in order to reflect on the power of this system to create ideological messages. They will focus on how one counter-cultural film with an alternative ideology, shaped through different conditions of production, can draw upon different traditions and aesthetics to promote attention to gender, ethnic and cultural identities generally unrecognised in Hollywood blockbusters.  One indicative film is Daughters of the Dust, which highlights the role and importance of women and African American women. Students will be assessed by a portfolio, which will comprise of a film review/analysis of a film, and a film script with an accompanying commentary. Workshops dedicated to analysing the stories, practicing scriptwriting, and working on a 300-word formative assignment piece will be built into the module and also tutorial feedback on the formative draft.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Offer a basic knowledge of the distinctive characteristics of film in relation to narrative fiction;

    • Provide an introductory knowledge of the complexities inherent in textual production

    • Help students gain an introductory knowledge and understanding of the distinctive visual characteristics of different film genres

    • Help students' gain an introductory knowledge and understanding of the contexts (historical, cultural geographical, economic, political and social) which can determine the form and interpretation of films and the ideological implications of these contexts for constructing social identities

    • Help students start to develop critical skills in the close reading and analysis of film discourses and capacity for independent thought and judgment in critical practice

    • Develop students' knowledge, understanding and ability to begin to critically evaluate the basics of some theoretical approaches to texts, including narrative and structural theory, semiotics, deconstruction, ideology, feminist and postcolonial theory.

    • Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of some secondary critical material and resources

    • Introduce students to appropriate literary and filmic critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation.

    • get students to start to identify contexts of textual production and think about the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts and language.

    • Start to develop students’ abilities to write to a specific brief and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Gain an introductory knowledge of film and how the film medium differs from written fictional narratives, in relation to the distinctive audio and visual conventions through which meanings and representations are constructed.

    • Gain a basic knowledge of the historical, geographical, cultural, economic and social contexts of the production of some films and how these contexts can determine the form and interpretation of films and the ideological implications of these contexts for constructing social identities

    • Gain a basic knowledge and understanding of narrative and cultural theory in relation to short stories and film productions

    • Apply critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of films and short stories

    • Develop a basic ability to use critical and analytical terminology appropriate to the discussion of film and appropriate scholarly citation

    • Gain some knowledge and understanding of generic conventions and the effects of authorship, production and audience on texts

    • Gain some experience of creative practice primarily as a means to critical reflection

    • Demonstrate literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;

    • Develop their research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material, at an introductory level;

    • Begin to develop their self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning.

     

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (3500 words)

  1. FILM AND CULTURAL IDENTITY
    (Compulsory) lau501
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will introduce students to the study of Film. Students will explore the medium of film and its impact through two main themes; 1) What is film and what is special about it as a medium? and 2) How is cultural identity (including, but not restricted to, gender, race, class, nationality, etc.) expressed through film?

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Develop students’ understanding of the nature and development of film as a medium.

    • Foster an understanding of key theoretical concepts in film studies.

    • Promote students’ ability to identify, analyse and evaluate films, using them in a critical and imaginative way, with a broad appreciation of their historical, cultural and literary context.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Display a strong understanding of the nature and development of film as a medium.

    • Identify, analyse and evaluate films, using them in a critical and imaginative way, with a broad appreciation of their historical, cultural and literary context.

    • Understand and evaluate a variety of current scholarship on film.

    • Offer some valid contributions to current conversations about and theoretical approaches to film.

    • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments on the cultural significance of film.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Presentation - Individual (15 minutes) or Small Groups (20 minutes)

    Component 2 - 50% Essay (3000 words)

  2. WORK RELATED LEARNING
    (Compulsory) plu512
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting. This module provides an opportunity for students wishing to attain National Professional recognition with the Teaching and Learning Academy (TLA) to complete an AMTLA project. The module will also provide the opportunity for those students interested in going on to the PGCE programme to gain support and guidance with the PGCE application process.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 0.00 Independent   : 0.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 0.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement/work experience in a workplace setting.
    • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement/work experience and of their independent learning throughout.
    • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.
    • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.
    • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

    1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.
    2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.
    3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.
    4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - Placement Registration Form

    Component 2 - 60% Work Placement Reflection (2500 words)

    Component 3 - 40% Work Placement Evaluation: Digital Resource (1500 words)

  3. MODERN DRAMA
    (Optional) dru500
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module picks up the historiographic strand of the Drama programme begun in Yr 1 with DRU411 (Comedy and Tragedy in Ancient and Early Modern Drama).  It focusses on the rapid changes in dramatic form that took place during the Modernist period. Students read and workshop plays and practices from Naturalist, Realist, Formalist, Epic, Cruelty, and Absurd movements in theatre, exploring the ideas and work of theorists, practitioners and writers such as Stanislavski, Chekhov, Strindberg, Lorca, Brecht and Beckett. The aim of the module is twofold: to consider how and why thinkers such as Darwin, Marx, and Freud impacted theatre practice so radically; and to develop students’ digital literacy and scholarship in preparation for written dissertation and potential higher study. Where possible the module will include a field trip to a relevant local theatre production.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 76.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Introduce students to the notion of Modernism, and in particular Modernist theatre practices, through selected plays and practitioners from the period.

    • Allow students to explore changing staging practices whereby distinctions between backstage, stage and auditorium are broken down, to institute ‘post-dramatic’ relations between actors and audiences.

    • Encourage students to research and develop their own tastes in theatrical practice, and communicate them in writing.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Workshop, discuss and analyse the impact of cultural change on key Modernist dramatists and theatre practitioners.

    • Develop their research skills and ability to structure argument.

    • Survey, contextualise, and critique Modernist changes to dramatic form in writing.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Essay (2000 words)

  4. THE PLEASURES OF READING AND WRITING
    (Optional) enu522
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module, alongside its semester two companion module, ‘the perils of reading and writing’, will enable students to develop their reading and writing practices in various forms and for various purposes and audiences. Using Helen Sword’s ‘BASE’ model, students will consider the behavioural, artisanal, social and emotional aspects of reading and writing. The first semester module focuses on theories of reading and writing and explores the tensions between a paranoid criticality, what Paul Ricoeur dubbed ‘the hermeneutics of suspicion’, and Rita Felski’s argument for ‘recognition, enchantment, knowledge and shock’ (Uses of Literature, 2008). Using such reader response theories, the module will ask students to consider their own academic reading and writing practices and the extent to which expectations of critical analysis conflict with sensations of encountering and experience, as well as the artistry of craft and creativity. The module also provides the opportunity to recognise and perform the pleasures of reading and writing through specific workshop tasks designed to help students to develop their own best practice. There will be a focus on the ‘social’ aspects of reading and writing, including collegiality and collaboration. This will culminate in the production of a piece of collaborative digital writing based on the experience of reading for pleasure. The assessment will be supported by workshops on writing for digital platforms and a non-assessed formative submission of 1000 words mid-semester.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 76.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • explore a range of literary and non-literary texts focusing on the complexities inherent in textual production;

    • develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary, and linguistic characteristics of different types of writing;

    • focus on the role of readers in making meaning from texts, and understanding of the ethical responsibilities of textual interpretation and language use

    • engage students’ critical skills in the close reading and analysis of texts to enhance their capacity for independent thought and judgment in critical practice;

    • improve students’ ability to write to a specific brief and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing.

    • develop students’ literacy and communication skills to an advanced level in written and spoken work;

    • improve students’ self-efficacy in making effective use of feedback and reflecting on how this facilitates improvements in their own performance; and their ability to act independently, manage own time, plan and organise workload to meet deadlines;

    • explore with students how to work collaboratively to support each other, and in problem solving;

    • provide opportunities to practice the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required by employers. 

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • understand the distinctive literary, and linguistic characteristics of a range of literary and non-literary texts;

    • analyse the role of readers in making meanings from texts including the ethical responsibilities of textual interpretation and language use;

    • engage critically in close analysis of texts to enhance their capacity to question ideas and interpretations;

    • improve their ability to write to a specific brief, within set time limits and engage productively and professionally in the processes of revision and editing;

    • develop advanced literacy and communication skills in written and spoken work;

    • to give and receive feedback on written work, reflecting on how this facilitates improvements in their own performance;

    • act independently, manage own time, plan and organise workload to meet deadlines;

    • work collaboratively to support their peers, and in problem solving;

    • practice the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required by employers.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Small Group Digital Writing Task (2000 words)

  5. THE ABRAHAMIC INHERITANCE: DIALOGUE AND DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CHRISTIANITY, ISLAM AND JUDAISM
    (Compulsory) thu515
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Beloved and favoured by God, Abraham/Ibrahim is an important figure in both the Qur’an and the Bible. Christians, Muslims, and Jews have all claimed to be the true descendants of Abraham and, therefore, the sole inheritors of God’s favour. More recently, the term “Abrahamic Religions” has been used by politicians, religious leaders, and normal people to express a fundamental similarity between Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.

     

    On this module, you will analyse and evaluate different discussions of Abraham to understand how this scriptural figure has been imagined by generations of religious and non-religious people. As you do so, you will see how this ancient story has been used to mark out differences between communities and to open up new paths for dialogue. By studying Abraham, you will gain a greater understanding of the place of religion in the twenty-first century.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • provide a coherent learning experience in the study of the three Abrahamic religions.

    • foster in students an academically rigorous and critical approach to the study of religious and philosophical texts and traditions that emerge from the Abrahamic Inheritance

    • engage students with significant contemporary issues (such as climate change, human rights and the nature of work) and with a range of answers to these challenges as they emerge in the Abrahamic inheritance.

    • enable students to construct an empathetic and critical awareness of the complexity and diversity of the relationship between the three Abrahamic religions at the local and global level, in order to deepen their understanding of contemporary society and the ongoing relevance of the academic study of religion.

    • support students as they develop knowledge of themselves, their own learning and their understanding of justice

    • equip students with the communication and IT skills necessary to express complex information in a coherent and cogent manner

    • provide students with opportunities to gain the transferable and employability skills to enable them to pursue their life ambitions

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Recognise teachings, practices, and texts from Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.

    • Describe with understanding different accounts of Abraham, in both scriptural and extra-scriptural sources.

    • Discuss and classify the ways that Abraham has been received in different times and places.

    • Compare artefacts and texts to critically analyse the significance of Abraham in the twenty-first century.

    • Evaluate the different ways that religious people and scholars of religion have sought to define and classify the differences and similarities between Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.

    • Create a personal response to the Abrahamic Inheritance that draws on the experience of the module.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Portfolio (2500 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Essay (2500 words)

  6. DISSERTATION PREPARATION
    (Compulsory) lau502
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module is designed to prepare students to undertake the capstone module. Students will work together on choosing a topic, planning their dissertation or research project, and starting their research. The module will provide students with a critical appreciation and understanding of the different types of research resources, tools and techniques used for taking on a larger project like a dissertation, as well as giving them an opportunity to start their research.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 76.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Equip students with the tools and techniques to write a dissertation in the field of Liberal Arts

    • Introduce students to research methods appropriate to undergraduate level research on an extended project such as a dissertation

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Identify and refine their own research question in their chosen area     

    • Gather, retrieve and synthesise secondary literature in their chosen area

    • Critically evaluate secondary literature in their chosen area

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Literature Review (3000 words)

  7. SCIENCE AND THE SEARCH FOR MEANING
    (Compulsory) lau503
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will give you the opportunity to examine some of the major developments in modern science, while assessing whether these developments can respond adequately to important ethical and philosophical questions such as ‘what is it to be human?’ and ‘how should I live?’ Through studying various scientific models of nature and human nature, you will be encouraged to develop an awareness of the philosophical and theological assumptions underpinning scientific approaches to knowledge and meaning. This will provide space for you to reflect afresh on the value of the humanities and the insights they hold.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Foster an appreciation for the philosophical and theological assumptions underlying the history of key scientific developments

    • Promote an understanding of how science is a historically-situated value-laden enterprise

    • Develop students’ ability to think critically and creatively about the relationship between the humanities and sciences

    • Develop students’ ethical reflection through a critical engagement with different worldviews.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Assess the philosophical and theological implications of some of the main developments in contemporary science

    • Outline and evaluate the way the history of science has shaped contemporary understandings of nature and human nature

    • Reflect critically on their own conception of nature and human nature, and present a coherent argument in support of it

    • Evaluate the ethical implications of reductive ‘scientistic’ philosophies

    • Reflect on the contemporary value of the humanities

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Presentation - Individual (15 minutes) or Small Groups (20 minutes)

    Component 2 - 50% Essay (3000 words)

  8. TEXTUAL INTERVENTIONS
    (Optional) enu525
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module is a specialist subject module that asks students to enact a literary intervention into a critical issue at this specific contemporary socio-political ‘conjuncture’. The precise content of the module will depend on the research area of the module leader and its application to a relevant moment of contemporary crisis. The module will begin with a series of taught sessions on the chosen subject as well as, more generally, introducing students to the ways in which literature and society intersect and the ability of ‘text’ to perform socially and politically. The taught sessions will enable students to identify primary works and their own critical approach to the subject. The remainder of the in-class sessions will support independent group projects in which students will collaborate on a piece of assessed work that uses literature/film to pose an intervention into the prevailing discourses currently shaping the subject. The assessed work could take the form of: a public presentation or performance for a specified audience; a public display for a specific location; a taught session at a local school; a digital artefact hosted by a relevant group/platform; a symposium of papers/posters for a specified audience. The module will build on group work skills developed at Level 4 in ‘Challenging the Canon’ and through in-class exercises and reflection. Project groups will have regular tutorials with the module leader where they will be provided with formative feedback.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the complex ways in which literature can engage and intervene in urgent social, cultural and political spaces and debates

    • Develop students’ knowledge of the ways in which critical readers can mediate between a literary text and an audience to effectively intervene in contemporary debates on a given subject

    • Develop independent research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate, interpret and synthesise complex information from diverse sources

    • Develop skills for collaborative learning and working

    • Develop students’ ability to identify the attributes, skills and approaches developed through study in the Humanities and valued by employers

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Enact a literary intervention into a critical issue at this specific contemporary socio-political ‘conjuncture’, demonstrating an understanding of how contexts (historical, cultural, geographical, economic, political and social) which can determine interpretation, and the ideological implications of these contexts

    • Demonstrate their ability to discuss relevant critical concepts in relation to literature and a capacity for independent thought and judgment in critical practice

    • Develop their research skills, including ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material

    • Collaborate productively with others in project management, research, negotiation, problem solving, writing, and delivery

    • Develop self-efficacy including ability to act independently, manage own time, plan and organise workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon own learning making effective use of feedback and support to facilitate improvements in own performance

    • Identify and reflect on the attributes, skills, attitudes and approaches expected and required of employees, the self-employed and employers.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Group Project (4000 word equivalent)

  9. THE DRAMATIC CLASSROOM
    (Optional) dru508
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This applied drama module helps students consolidate their learning and consider how they might like to use their knowledge professionally when they graduate. The module is timed at the end of level 5, and designed to feed into either a workplace, or a practice as research dissertation. It also introduces students to the school experience they need when applying for PGCEs or other routes into teaching.

     

    The module is taught practically. Students explore key aspects of the drama-in-education practice of Dorothy Heathcote and others, in which doing and thinking come together as learners encounter their curriculum through role. Students learn how to structure role-play safely for children so that the boundary between fiction and real life, so clearly delineated by stage and auditorium in the theatre building, is not lost in the classroom. They read and use theories of learning to help them analyse the lessons in which they participate, as well as the work of leading experts in the field. The module will normally include a field trip.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Allow students to engage in experiential drama as participants to gain personal insight into ways in which the practical strategies of Heathcote and Bolton can motivate and engage learners.

    • Demonstrate the importance of structuring role safely for children so that they can encounter dramatic situations confidently and actively without becoming confused or disorientated.

    • Acquaint students with teaching strategies such as Heathcote’s Conventions for Dramatic Action, in relation to learning theories such as Jerome Bruner’s Modes of Learning. 

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Take part in practical drama workshops and develop ability to work collaboratively.

    • Discuss, reflect upon, and analyse workshop structure. 

    • Gain a wider understanding of practitioners' work through reading selected texts. 

    • Develop their grasp of learning theory and their ability to make connections between drama and active learning.

    • Analyse a drama in education lesson using theory studied on the module.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Written Evaluation (3000 words)

  1. DISSERTATION
    (Optional) lau601
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This double module allows students to undertake a sustained piece of independent research into a topic of their own choosing, and to apply the concepts, theories and methodologies (as relevant) that they have learnt about during the degree. Students’ work will demonstrate a grounding in current research and establish clear lines of original enquiry. Students may choose to write an extended piece of written research, or undertake a practice-based research. They will be supported by an individual supervisor or supervisors who in in individual tutorials.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 17.00 Independent   : 383.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 400.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Ensure students have a command of a body of knowledge, defined by their chosen topic

    • provide opportunities for students to develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary, linguistic and/or dramatic characteristics of genres, methods and/or theoretical approaches relevant to their dissertation or project;

    • teach students how to choose and apply relevant methods and/or critical approaches independently in their close reading and analysis of texts;

    • allow students to show their achievement in using advanced literacy and communication skills which produce work that is coherently structured to produce a clear argument or evaluation, written in a scholarly way, including the use of critical, analytical and theoretical terminology;

    • allow students to show their ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level;

    • develop, in students, an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, and act independently as appropriate; independently research including scoping and planning a project, developing an appropriate reading list to support the project; manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning;

    • An understanding of, and the ability critically to evaluate, a variety of approaches to their chosen subject

    • The ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments using an appropriately wide range of literature

    • The ability to plan and execute complex tasks within a given time-frame

    • The ability to work autonomously, setting goals and deadlines as appropriate in order to complete set tasks

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Command a body of knowledge, defined by their chosen topic.

    • Understand and critically evaluate a variety of approaches to their subject

    • Plan and execute complex tasks within a given time-frame.

    • develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of the distinctive literary, linguistic and/or dramatic characteristics of genres, methods and/or theoretical approaches relevant to their dissertation;

    • employ effective stylistic and structural features, which matches form to content, purpose and audience;

    • apply relevant methods and/or critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of texts;

    • develop advanced literacy and communication skills which produce work that is coherently structured to produce a clear argument or evaluation, written in a scholarly way, including the use of critical, analytical and theoretical terminology;

    • show their ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material to a sophisticated level;

    • develop an advanced level of self-efficacy by showing their ability to follow advice, and act independently as appropriate; independently research including scoping and planning a project, developing an appropriate reading list to support the project; manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - Gatekeeper: Pass/Fail Element - Short Presentation (5-10 minutes)

    Component 2 - 100% Dissertation (10,000 words) or Practice-Based Research Project (10,000 word equivalent)

  2. NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT
    (Optional) plu601
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module offers students the opportunity to build on their level 5 work placement through the more developed application of a negotiated work-based research project. Students will agree with their placement tutor and workplace mentor a brief for a project which addresses a need within the organisation. Learners should complete a minimum of 100 hours in the work place. It is in the spirit of this module that wherever possible, the focus will be on social or community / sustainable development.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 276.00 Placement   : 100.00 Total   : 400.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Enable students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing a negotiated work-based research project

    • Encourage students to use appropriate work-based research methods

    • Enable students to work collaboratively in a work setting, establishing continuity from their previous work placement and offering tangible evidence of building on this prior experience, where possible

    • Generate confidence and security in students’ employability on graduation

     

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Secure, negotiate and design a work-based research project

    • Develop an understanding of, and apply, research methods that are appropriate to work-based contexts

    • Interpret gathered information

    • Make a clear and productive contribution to the organization through the development of recommendations arising from the work-based research project

    • Present a creatively engaging argument

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT (8000 WORDS)

  3. INVENTING GENOCIDE: FROM IMAGINATION TO MEMORY
    (Compulsory) lau602
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    The concept of genocide was ‘invented’ in the wake of the Holocaust. It began as a legal definition which was accepted by the UN in 1948. However, the term has since evolved to frame our modern understanding of organised political violence both in the distant past and the contemporary world. This module asks students to reflect on the development of the concept of genocide. It traces the historical origins of anti-Semitism asking students to reflect on the political, social and cultural function of minority persecution. This provides the context for understanding the Shoah, as students analyse the ways in which mass murder has consequently been memorialised and re-imagined. Having focused on this central case study, students will then consider more recent genocides such as events in Rwanda. They will then critically assess the ways in which the twentieth-century definition should be revised to reflect a contemporary analysis.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 48.00 Independent   : 152.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Introduce students to the historical development of anti-Semitism in Europe.

    • Familiarise students with the Shoah and with the ways in which it has been remembered.

    • Enable students to reflect on the way that other minority persecutions have been imagined, implemented and memorialised.

    • Introduce students to a range of theories and approaches required to consider genocide as a concept and episodes of genocide, whether historical or contemporary.

    • Enable students to reflect on how different ways of remembering genocide have developed over time and in response to changing political and cultural contexts.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Discuss and analyse examples of anti-Semitism in European history.

    • Study, present and critically comment on first-hand accounts and personal reflections upon anti-Semitism and other examples of minority persecution.

    • Conduct, present and critique independent research into organised political violence, its causes and consequences.

    • Critically apply the concept of genocide to a chosen case study (either historical or contemporary).

    • Draw on relevant concepts and approaches to reflect ethically on state violence and the way in which it is related, re-described and remembered. 

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Essay (3000 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Individual Presentation (10-15 minutes)

  4. APPLIED THEATRE HEALTH AND WELLBEING
    (Optional) dru603
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will normally introduce students to a practical and critical understanding of the role, purpose and effectiveness of Applied Theatre in Health & Wellbeing. This module focuses on giving a theoretical and practical knowledge background for using various methods of designing and introducing Applied Theatre projects. The students will address health & wellbeing issues through theatre projects in educational, health & wellbeing contexts including approaches such as Theatre in Health Education, Theatre in Hospitals, Theatre in Prisons etc. Using this knowledge, the module equips and encourages students to employ these skills to bid for funding in Arts and Community Organisations, with awareness of career opportunities for the artist in healthcare.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Various forms of Applied Drama/Theatre practice in health & wellbeing.

    • How and why drama processes can raise awareness about health and wellbeing including approaches such as Theatre in Health Education, Theatre in Hospitals, Theatre in Prisons etc.

    • How experiences can develop ideas of using drama for ‘transforming’ the lives of individuals and community groups. 

    • The practical and technical aspects of writing a proposal (bid) about Applied Theatre projects in health and wellbeing addressed to community organisations.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Understand and be able to critically analyse key Applied Theatre forms in educational, health & wellbeing contexts including approaches such as Theatre in Health Education, Theatre in Hospitals, Theatre in Prisons etc.

    • Demonstrate the processes by which Drama is created: researched, realised and managed.

    • Engage in independent research into the needs concerns and interests of individuals and community groups for Applied Theatre interventions and use techniques associated with identifiable cultural forms or practitioners.

    • Communicate ideas and research findings in essays.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Essay - Application (3000 words)

  5. LANGUAGE AND MEDIA
    (Optional) enu621
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module explores the varieties of discourses utilised in mass and social/new media and how these discourses contribute to the representation of individuals, groups, events and nations. Links between discourse and ideology will be explored, with a particular focus on the ways in which aspects of gender, class, and race are represented through various media and online. The module will consider the relationships among representation, genre, audience, multimodality and ideology, as they are produced in media and social media contexts. The module will explore the relationship between words and images (multimodality) and the conventions which media producers and consumers draw on for production and consumption of texts. Considering these issues in development of media, students are then expected to undertake their own research, investigating topics covered in the module and to critically evaluate source material they choose for themselves. Students will receive regular formative feedback both from their tutor and peers on group and individual work throughout the module.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Help students gain a detailed knowledge of the field of media studies, with an appreciation for the different approaches to the study of media language from a variety of different perspectives;

    • Develop students' knowledge, understanding and ability to evaluate critically a range of theoretical approaches to the study of media and Internet discourse, while looking at a range of text types from everyday interaction, in newspapers and magazines, and online;

    • Help students gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of the study of language in the media and online has developed over time;

    • Develop students' ability to think critically about different approaches to media and Internet language and to analyse texts in structured, reflective and analytical ways;

    • Help students explain and critically evaluate significant issues in recent approaches to media and Internet language;

    • Develop students' skills and abilities in the finding, retrieval, synthesis and use of a range of resources to investigate language in media and Internet contexts, including everyday talk and interaction, literary texts, and journal articles.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Develop a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of how linguistics is used to describe and analyse media and Internet discourse;

    • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of a range of theoretical approaches to media and Internet discourse and how these theories affect methodology;

    • Understand the social contexts which can determine the interpretation of language, and the ideological implications of these contexts for constructing social identities

    • Gain a detailed knowledge of the ethical responsibilities of language use

    • Gain a detailed knowledge of a range of approaches analysis of media and Internet discourse from a variety of settings, as well as understand the appropriacy of different approaches in different settings

    • Apply in a sophisticated way a range of critical approaches to the study of media and Internet discourse, with a focus on students’ own interests, both in text types and analytic approaches;

    • Produce their own small-scale analysis of media and Internet discourse in written texts, with a focus on the applying linguistic analysis in a reliable and consistent way;

    • Gain a detailed knowledge and understanding of generic conventions and the effects of authorship, production, and audience for media and Internet discourse analysis, as well as understanding its usefulness in descriptions and analysis of social interaction;

    • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these in contexts and create work that is coherently structured;

    • Develop an advanced level of self-efficacy in terms of their own analysis, by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organise their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances;

    • To collaborate productively with others in research, negotiation, problem solving, writing, and presentation skills to an advanced level;

    • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesise such material.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Analysis of Text (4000 words)

  6. RUINS AND RUINATION
    (Compulsory) lau603
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    We are very familiar with the ruin. On television and in film, places ruined by war or natural disaster form the backdrop of news items and popular entertainment. In our cities, the presence of ruined buildings is taken as an indication of the poverty of the city and the criminality of its population. If we’re lucky enough to travel abroad, we might visit the ruins of empires now lost and think about how imperial legacies shape our own experience of the present.

     

    This module explores the ruin as a cultural trope that recurs in different times and in different places. Texts that you analyse on this module may come from places as diverse as ancient north Africa, early modern Scandinavia, Rome during the Second World War and Bradford in the early 2000s. In all cases, you’ll analyse how ruined places are understood by the people who encountered and wrote about them. You’ll be encouraged to make connections between these ruins and your own experiences of ruin as you meet them in your everyday life. In so doing, you’ll trace the long and complex history of ruination and its continued effect on our world.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Develop students’ knowledge of the cultural, literary and religious tropes that coalesce around the figure of the ruin;

    • Analyse the similarities and differences between the ways that ruins have been described over time.

    • Evaluate discourse about ruins within wider cultural, literary and religious context.

    • Apply learning about ruins to formulate wider models of change and continuity (focussing on themes such as: imperial decline; temporality; providence; the supernatural).

    • Position contemporary ruin studies as an interdisciplinary strand of the Humanities.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Discuss and analyse how the ruin has been understood in different times and places.

    • Critically interpret processes of ruination through culturally specific models of time and historical change.

    • Compare specific examples of ruin, analysing them according to general models and theories of ruination.

    • Evaluate contemporary ruin discourse as part of a wider process of human meaning making in different parts of the world.

    • Formulate a response to a particular ruin site, showing how ruin discourse illuminates wider aspects of the contemporary cultural context.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 70% Portfolio (3000 words)

    Component 2 - 30% Peer Assessment (1000 word equivalent)

  7. VIRTUES AND VALUES
    (Optional) thu604
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module enables you to explore the ways in which ancient ideas of virtues and values have been reasserted and recast by twentieth and twenty-first century philosophers. By engaging with ancient Greek texts you will have the opportunity to critically assess some of the ethical ideals upheld by this literature, such as Homer’s warrior-hero Achilles, Aeschylus’ tragic hero Agamemnon and Plato’s transcendent Forms. Evaluating the ways in which these accounts of virtue have been fundamental in shaping more modern perceptions of what it means to lead a good life found in, for example, Iris Murdoch’s account of the Good, Jean-Paul Sartre’s existentialist writings, and Martha Nussbaum’s insights about moral luck and tragic dilemmas will encourage you to critique the ideas of justice and good character promoted by our own contemporary culture.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Deepen the students’ understanding of some of the most important ancient Greek thinkers.

    • Foster an awareness of the role of context and culture in the development of ancient Greek thought.

    • Develop the students’ understanding of how some of the key themes and ideas from ancient Greek philosophy have been appropriated, critiqued and developed by contemporary philosophers.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the thought of key ancient Greek thinkers

    • Analyse and evaluate the influence of Greek ideas on contemporary philosophers

    • Demonstrate a critical appreciation of the role of context and culture in the development of ancient Greek thought

    • Engage confidently with and critique the thought of key ancient Greek and twentieth century philosophers.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 40% Essay (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 60% Assignment in Negotiated Format (2500 words equivalent)

  8. MYTH AND RELIGION IN THE ANCIENT WORLD
    (Optional) hsu606
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will introduce the student to the study of myth and religion in the ancient world. Students will examine theoretical approaches to myth and religion in ancient Greece and Rome, including theories on the nature of myth and aspects of ancient religious practice.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Develop a deep critical understanding of ancient myth and religion

    • Identify and engage with historiography and primary sources of ancient myth and religion

    • Foster understanding of theoretical concepts and themes relating to ancient myth and religion

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Critically evaluate historical themes and problems relating to ancient myth and religion

    • Engage with and assess the historiography of ancient myth and religion

    • Critically evaluate the historical context of ancient Greek and Roman myth and religion

    • Critically evaluate relevant historical sources relating to ancient myth and religion

    • Present a clear and sustained central argument

    • Communicate clearly, effectively and with appropriate referencing

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Individual Oral Presentation (15 minutes)

    Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)