Theology and Philosophy BA (Hons)

Honours Degree , Full-time

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Key Details

  • 3 Years
  • 96 Typical UCAS Tariff
  • VV56 Course Code
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Overview

Theology and Philosophy are of great importance for understanding the world in which we live, as both our history and our modern culture are shaped by religious beliefs and philosophical traditions. This is an ideal course for the student with wide interests who loves thinking and debating. The course will encourage you to consider the deep questions facing individuals and society about life and death, culture and identity, and the responsibility of human beings to one another and to the environment.  Almost every story covered in the media has an ethical, philosophical or religious dimension to it, so that theology is always relevant to the issues of today. Students from a range of backgrounds and prior learning experiences are welcome, and the course is open to those of any religious tradition or none.

Why study this course?

  • Theology and Philosophy scored 100% for overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2019.
  • Theology and Philosophy at Newman challenges students to think deeply about the greatest questions facing society today such as climate change, human rights, gender equality and the nature of work.
  • The Theology tutors at Newman make use of an interactive teaching style, which is greatly appreciated by students; in the National Student Survey 2019, for example, we scored 99% for satisfaction with teaching,
  • The course emphasises the ability to read and engage with primary texts, such as the scriptures and creeds of the world’s religions and the writings of philosophers and theologians
  • Field trips to places of worship and other sites of interest are included in some modules
  • The programme includes optional modules in Religious education for those students considering a career in teaching

What does the course cover?

Theology and Philosophy is a broad area of study, which embraces a whole variety of other subjects, including history, literature, politics, sociology and anthropology. The Theology and Philosophy degree at Newman offers you the opportunity to study all the key areas of the wide subject of theology, including: Christian theology, both classical and modern; philosophy of religion; ethical theories and issues; biblical interpretation; and how different religions interact with society and politics. The first year of the Programme aims to give you a solid grounding in all of these areas and also to help you make the transition to University study.

In the second and third years you will develop your knowledge and skills further through a combination of compulsory and optional modules. These will cover both ancient and modern perspectives on Theology, Philosophy, and Ethics, and provide opportunities to study areas such as biblical interpretation and Religious Education. During your final year you will explore deeply a topic of your choice and write a 10,000 word dissertation A key element of the whole course is engagement with primary texts, including the scriptures of the major religions, and a willingness to evaluate a variety of perspectives is expected.

In addition to the compulsory work placement strand which is a feature of all Newman’s degree programmes, the Theology and Philosophy course includes an employability-related module in the third year. This allows students to engage directly with community organisations, charities and other agencies to apply their theological and philosophical knowledge in order to create solutions for real-life problems.

How will I be assessed?

The course uses a variety of assessments to help develop a range of different skills including essays, poster and oral presentations, textual commentaries, book reviews, case studies, portfolios, digital artefacts, reflective logs and research projects. There are no written examinations.

What careers could I consider?

Theology and Philosophy graduates go on to a wide range of careers, including teaching, the police service, the NHS, administration in the public and private sectors, human resources, and retail or hotel management. Others take professional post-graduate courses to qualify as, for example, lawyers, accountants, youth workers, social workers or librarians. The skills of critical thinking, evaluation, communication, and cultural and religious understanding gained during the course are valued by many different kinds of employers.

Learning Days - Autumn 2019

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Contact Details

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Entry Requirements

You must achieve at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma; MPP at BTEC Extended Diploma) towards the total tariff.

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9-M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

Five GCSEs at grade 4 (or C) or above (or recognised equivalents), including English Language, are also required.

For applicants who are unsure that they will achieve the above UCAS tariff, Newman University offers Theology and Philosophy (with Foundation Year) which enables such applicants to access a university degree via a four year route. Upon successful completion of their foundation year, students will progress to Year 1 of a named degree. Whilst not a condition of entry onto the Foundation Year, students wishing to follow particular named routes with additional entry requirements, will need to meet these requirements before they make the transition from their foundation year to year 1.

Course Fees

Fees per academic year:
Full-time UK/EU students: £9,250 *
Part-time UK/EU students: £5,130

* Fees shown are for 2020/21 academic year. The University will review tuition fees and increase fees in line with any inflationary uplift as determined by the UK Government, if permitted by law or government policy, on enrolment and in subsequent years of your course. It is anticipated that such increases would be linked to RPI (the Retail Price Index excluding mortgage interest payments).

Additional Costs

Find out more about the other additional costs associated with our undergraduate degrees. 

 

Additional Information

General Academic Regulations: Terms and Conditions for students attending our courses

Modules

Please note that modules THU516, THU517, THU505, THU506 and THU616, THU 617, THU605, THU606 will normally be made available in alternate years, so that 1 RE and 1 Biblical Studies option will run every year and will be open to both Level 5 and Level 6 students, who will choose one. Second and third year students will thus be taught together.

  1. METHODS IN THEOLOGICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDY
    (Compulsory) thu401
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This compulsory module aims to support first year students in the transition into Higher Education and prepare them to succeed in their theological and philosophical studies. It provides the opportunity and time for students to acquire and/or develop the academic study skills, both general and subject-specific, on which they will need to draw throughout their programme, for example: research skills; bibliographic referencing; academic writing; reading and commenting appropriately on primary theological and philosophical texts; critical analysis; and summarising and evaluating sources. These skills will be taught in lectures and workshops, then practised and reinforced in seminars and through weekly written tasks. The development of these skills will be set within a coherent framework which also addresses key areas of subject knowledge, so that an overarching theme for the module will be chosen each year, for example creation.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 44.00 Independent   : 156.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • enable students to gain knowledge and understanding of introductory concepts in Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies

    • promote the value and skills of independent learning and research in theology and philosophy

    • equip the students to read primary theological and philosophical texts with confidence and an appropriate level of sophistication and academic rigour

    • develop the students’ skills in academic writing and critical analysis

    • introduce students to the conventions of academic referencing.

     

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

    • develop a range of study skills to help prepare them for further successful study (e.g. ICT skills, library and research skills, referencing skills, and skills of academic writing)

    • gain a knowledge and understanding of introductory concepts in Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies

    • demonstrate their ability to engage with and make informed comment on a range of primary theological and philosophical texts

    • debate theological and philosophical issues from a range of perspectives

    • develop as an independent and reflective learner.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 30% Portfolio of Study Skill Exercises (1000 words)

    Component 2 - 70% Portfolio of Theological and Philosophical Tasks (3000 words)

  2. READING SACRED TEXTS: THE JEWISH AND CHRISTIAN BIBLE
    (Compulsory) thu406
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Sacred texts form the authoritative core of most religious faiths; their doctrines, traditions and often institutional structures. Therefore, understanding their historical and contemporary functions within the religious community is fundamental to religious and philosophical studies. The Hebrew (Tanakh) and Christian Bible present an ideal opportunity to provide students with the foundational knowledge and critical apparatus in order to understand, analyse and reflect upon the dynamic relationship between text, religion and society; how texts are produced, interpreted and applied throughout history and the present day.

     

    This module aims to provide foundational knowledge and the development of core skills that are fundamental to a degree in Theology and Philosophy, particularly when addressing primary sources. During the module students will acquire an understanding of the Jewish and Christian canons of scripture and how they relate to one another as well as the geo-political and historical settings in which they were produced. Students will gain a secure understanding of literary and historical reading methods used to study biblical texts and a confidence in applying them to produce their own exegetical textual analyses. They will also encounter and reflect upon contemporary contextual and ideological readings. In the light of wide range of student backgrounds and experience (traditional and non-traditional) (4.2), the module creates a shared knowledge-base as well as instilling critical and analytical skills that feed into the other modules and programmes.   

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Introduce students to key elements of subject knowledge and understanding in relation to the contents and major themes of the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) and the New Testament.

    • Introduce the students to the varied historical, geographical, literary and theological contexts of the books of the Jewish and Christian Bible, and to the impact these factors have on an informed understanding of the texts.

    • Encourage students to explore and critically apply variety of methods of reading and interpreting biblical texts, including exegetical, and contextual (ideological) critical approaches.

    • Foster in students a sensitivity to the complexities involved in reading sacred texts in a variety of traditions (e.g. translation difficulties and truth claims).

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Acquire a basic knowledge and understanding of the contents, genres and themes present within the Jewish and Christian Bible.

    • An ability to describe the dynamic relationship between text, religion and society and critically reflect upon it.

    • Develop their sensitivity to the complexity of religious language and experience as captured in the sacred texts of some of the world’s major religions.

    • Develop their skills of independent learning and research.

    • Identify the place of the reader within the hermeneutic process.

    • Demonstrate their ability to engage critically with the primary religious texts contained within the Jewish and Christian Bible.

    • Demonstrate an understanding of key critical approaches in contemporary Biblical Studies (e.g. Feminist Biblical Criticism).

    • Write a critically informed biblical commentary on one or more set texts.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Commentaries on Two Set Texts (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

  3. POLITICS AND RELIGION IN BRITAIN
    (Compulsory) thu412
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module explores the role of religion and politics in Britain by bringing classical texts of political philosophy into dialogue with real case studies from the recent past. You will become familiar with key concepts that have influenced how religion is understood in Britain today. Arguments about religious toleration, individual freedom, and the role of the state have real consequences for how people live and so over the course of this module you’ll analyse how these abstract political concepts play out in our contemporary world.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • provide a coherent learning in Religious Studies and Political Philosophy, as they pertain to Britain in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries;

    • foster in students an academically rigorous and critical approach to the study of Politics and Religion;

    • engage students with the current role(s) of religion in British politics and public life;

    • enable students to conduct an empathetic and critical awareness of the complexity of the connection between religion and politics in Britain in order to deepen their understanding of contemporary society and the ongoing relevance of the study of religion;

    • support students as they develop knowledge of themselves, their own learning and their understanding of justice

    • equip students with the communication and IT skills necessary to express complex information in a coherent and cogent manner

    • provide students with opportunities to gain the transferable and employability skills to enable them to pursue their life ambitions.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Describe and explain some fundamental positions in political philosophy as it pertains to religion.

    • Apply these abstract concepts to specific situations, drawing on personal experience and case studies.

    • Analyse case studies, deploying concepts from political philosophy to examine the role of religion in contemporary Britain.

    • Evaluate the claims of key religious and political actors in British society, situating them within the wider social and historical context of religion and politics.

       

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 60% Collection of Short Essays (1500 words)

    Component 2 - 40% Group Presentation (10 minutes, 1500 word equivalent)

  4. PEOPLE, PLACES, PERFORMANCE: RESEARCHING RELIGION
    (Compulsory) thu410
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will introduce you to the skills necessary to research religious studies both inside and outside the classroom. Offering a mix of guided and independent study, the module includes visits to religious centres in the Birmingham area. Through lectures and carefully guided practical sessions you will build up the skills necessary for research and study of religions. The teaching in the module is directed towards producing a portfolio of work responding to a visit to a religious centre.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 76.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Develop students’ independent learning and research skills for continual study of religion and theology.

    • Evaluate the different methods by which religious beliefs, writings, rituals etc. can be studied.

    • Critically reflect on the way that religion is conceptualised and examined in and outside the university.

    • Explore the interaction of religion and society through field trips.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Acquire knowledge and understanding of the beliefs, practices, traditions, texts and history of one or more of the world’s major religions.

    • Debate and evaluate the competing claims of a variety of viewpoints on the nature of religion and its study.

    • Recognise the variety of research approaches and resources open to the student of religion.

    • Interpret a variety of primary source material (e.g. written, architectural etc.), appraise its value for the study of religions, and thereby develop a sensitivity to the complexity of religious language and experience.

    • Review existing online resources for the study of religion, deploying ICT skills to collate this information before using written and oral communication skills to explain the outcomes of this review to others.

    • Revise and modify their understanding of the nature of religion in light of knowledge gained through the module.

    • Apply their developing skills as researchers of religion to analyse and evaluate a site of religious significance.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (3000 words)

  5. INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING
    (Compulsory) plu404
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module aims to equip students with the knowledge and self-management skills to make informed choices in preparing for work placement and the transition to employment or further study on graduation.  

    Learners will be provided with the opportunities to develop awareness of the workplace, identify different career and study options, recognise and articulate their own experience, accomplishments and talents and plan and implement career management strategies for the short and long term.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 12.00 Independent   : 88.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Support students in developing informed choices about the career pathways available to them, in relation to their subject choices.
    • Prepare students for work-based learning and the application / exploration of subject knowledge in the workplace.

    • Encourage students to make connections between their learning, placement choice, future job aspirations and contribution to society.

    • Enable students to build confidence in securing work placements and future employment.

    • Support students in reflecting upon their preparation for their work placement and future employment.  

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

    1. Examine how their experiences, accomplishments, and abilities relate to employer expectations.

    2. Demonstrate engagement with, and an understanding of, graduate employment pathways and employability issues relating to their own career aspirations.

    3. Research organisations for the purposes of securing a work placement.

    4. Reflect upon their learning and development.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Reflective Essay and Appendix, 2000 words

  6. THE FOUNDATIONS OF CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY
    (Compulsory) thu411
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    Presuming no prior knowledge, this module introduces you to the key features of Christian Theology. Each week we will study a key component of Christian Theology and examine how it was developed in the work of one or two important theologians. We’ll think about how the work of Christian Theology engages with questions of race, sexuality, gender, disability and class. As our knowledge of Christian Theology develops, we’ll begin to consider how these resources might help us to meet the great challenges facing humanity today.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Provide a coherent introductory study of Christian Theology

    • Foster in students an academically rigorous and critical approach to the study of Christian Theology

    • Engage students with significant contemporary issues (such as climate change, human rights, and the nature of work) and with a range of answers to these challenges

    • enable students to construct an empathetic and critical awareness of the complexity and diversity of Christian Theology in order to deepen their understanding of contemporary society and of the ongoing relevance of the academic study of theology and philosophy

    • support students as they develop knowledge of themselves, their own learning and their understanding of justice

    • equip students with the communication and IT skills necessary to express complex information in a coherent and cogent manner

    • provide students with opportunities to gain the transferable and employability skills to enable them to pursue their life ambitions.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Identify and describe the fundamental teachings of Christian Theology (e.g. Christology; Trinity; anthropology)   

    • Analyse primary sources to show how particular theologians have developed these teachings.

    • Compare different positions on particular teachings, including questions of gender, sexuality, disability, race and class.

    • Evaluate Christian Theology’s potential contribution to several key areas of contemporary controversy.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Textual Analysis of Primary Source (1000 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Essay on General Theme or Doctrine (1500 words or equivalent)

  7. KNOWLEDGE, THOUGHT AND REALITY: PHILOSOPHY IN THE MAKING
    (Compulsory) thu415
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    In this module you will be introduced to some of the most exciting questions in philosophy such as: Can we know anything? Are we free? Is there such a thing as ‘reality’? Through an encounter with the works of some of the most well-known philosophers, for example Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Descartes, and Hume, and some who write from different standpoints, for example bell hooks and Cornel West, you will explore different answers to these questions and study how they have helped to form our view of ourselves and the world around us.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Foster an appreciation of the wide variety of approaches taken by historical and contemporary thinkers towards key philosophical issues

    • Encourage a critical understanding of the different epistemologies proposed by historical philosophers

    • Develop students’ critical analysis of the philosophical canon through an appreciation of alternative voices.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Demonstrate a competent knowledge of some of the main debates in philosophy

    • Show an understanding of how contemporary debates in epistemology have been informed by key historic philosophers

    • Demonstrate an understanding of how the ‘Western’ philosophical canon has been challenged by contemporary philosophers and theologians

    • Engage critically with metaphysical and epistemological questions

    • Express their philosophical stance in a logical reasoned argument.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 30% Analysis of a Key Text (1000 words)

    Component 2 - 70% Essay (2000 words)

  1. FROM MONASTICISM TO MODERNITY
    (Compulsory) thu525
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Beginning with the wisdom traditions of monastic theology, this module tracks the development of philosophical and theological enquiry through the second millennium. You’ll explore how the theology of the monasteries gives way to the scholasticism of the universities, before the rise of nominalism foreshadows the reforming theologies of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The module concludes by laying out the key intellectual, technological and social shifts that herald modernity.

     

    Each week will focus on a primary source, interpreted and analysed through group discussion. We’ll explore the key ideas in each source and connect them to their wider context. Attention will be paid to the ways that our writers engaged with questions of gender, race, class and disability. The module focuses on Western Europe, although it will situate primary sources in a wider global context.

     

    The module aims to equip you with the knowledge and skills foundational to success in the rest of the programme. It provides you with an opportunity to develop skills of collaborative research work and to experience the process of refining ideas that is part of the research experience.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 76.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Foster in students an academically rigorous and critical approach to the development of Theology and Philosophy in Western Europe in the second millennium.

    • enable students to construct an empathetic and critical awareness of the complexity and diversity of Theology and Philosophy in order to deepen their understanding of the ongoing relevance of Theology and Philosophy in the twenty-first century.

    • Equip students with the communication skills necessary to express complex information in a coherent and cogent matter.

    • Provide students with opportunities to gain the transferrable and employability skills to enable them to pursue their life ambitions.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Identify and recognise different vocabularies and conceptual frameworks of theologies in conflict;

    • Critically interpret primary texts by drawing on secondary sources and situating them in their contexts;

    • Analyse the relationship between particular primary sources and the general theological context from which they emerged;

    • Use class reading to gain a deeper understanding of the development of theology and philosophy over time;

    • Create a model of historical change, working with colleagues to advance and debate different interpretations of historical documents.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (3000 words)

  2. WORK RELATED LEARNING
    (Compulsory) plu512
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting. This module provides an opportunity for students wishing to attain National Professional recognition with the Teaching and Learning Academy (TLA) to complete an AMTLA project. The module will also provide the opportunity for those students interested in going on to the PGCE programme to gain support and guidance with the PGCE application process.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 0.00 Independent   : 0.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 0.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement/work experience in a workplace setting.
    • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement/work experience and of their independent learning throughout.
    • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.
    • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.
    • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

    1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.
    2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.
    3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.
    4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - Placement Registration Form

    Component 2 - 60% Work Placement Reflection (2500 words)

    Component 3 - 40% Work Placement Evaluation: Digital Resource (1500 words)

  3. THE ABRAHAMIC INHERITANCE: DIALOGUE AND DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CHRISTIANITY, ISLAM AND JUDAISM
    (Compulsory) thu515
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Beloved and favoured by God, Abraham/Ibrahim is an important figure in both the Qur’an and the Bible. Christians, Muslims, and Jews have all claimed to be the true descendants of Abraham and, therefore, the sole inheritors of God’s favour. More recently, the term “Abrahamic Religions” has been used by politicians, religious leaders, and normal people to express a fundamental similarity between Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.

     

    On this module, you will analyse and evaluate different discussions of Abraham to understand how this scriptural figure has been imagined by generations of religious and non-religious people. As you do so, you will see how this ancient story has been used to mark out differences between communities and to open up new paths for dialogue. By studying Abraham, you will gain a greater understanding of the place of religion in the twenty-first century.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • provide a coherent learning experience in the study of the three Abrahamic religions.

    • foster in students an academically rigorous and critical approach to the study of religious and philosophical texts and traditions that emerge from the Abrahamic Inheritance

    • engage students with significant contemporary issues (such as climate change, human rights and the nature of work) and with a range of answers to these challenges as they emerge in the Abrahamic inheritance.

    • enable students to construct an empathetic and critical awareness of the complexity and diversity of the relationship between the three Abrahamic religions at the local and global level, in order to deepen their understanding of contemporary society and the ongoing relevance of the academic study of religion.

    • support students as they develop knowledge of themselves, their own learning and their understanding of justice

    • equip students with the communication and IT skills necessary to express complex information in a coherent and cogent manner

    • provide students with opportunities to gain the transferable and employability skills to enable them to pursue their life ambitions

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Recognise teachings, practices, and texts from Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.

    • Describe with understanding different accounts of Abraham, in both scriptural and extra-scriptural sources.

    • Discuss and classify the ways that Abraham has been received in different times and places.

    • Compare artefacts and texts to critically analyse the significance of Abraham in the twenty-first century.

    • Evaluate the different ways that religious people and scholars of religion have sought to define and classify the differences and similarities between Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.

    • Create a personal response to the Abrahamic Inheritance that draws on the experience of the module.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Portfolio (2500 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Essay (2500 words)

  4. ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ETHICS
    (Compulsory) thu507
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    Taking this module will enable you to examine some of the most pressing ethical debates of our age from human cloning and genetic modification to capital punishment and overseas military intervention. You will be encouraged to assess the arguments for and against different ethical positions, while developing an appreciation for the underlying philosophical issues like autonomy and choice, the value of human and non-human life, and the purpose of modern medicine.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Develop an understanding of some of the key debates in applied ethics

    • Foster an awareness of the underlying philosophical and theological assumptions behind these debates

    • Develop the student’s knowledge of the major ethical theories and their application

    • Develop the student’s own carefully evaluated ethical standpoint

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Demonstrate a competent knowledge of the major theories of ethics

    • Show an understanding of the philosophical issues that underlie many debates in contemporary ethics

    • Engage confidently and critically with some of the key contemporary thinkers in applied ethics

    • Critically evaluate how the main theories of ethics have been applied to some contemporary issues

    • Present their understanding in a logical fashion, demonstrating an awareness of the complexities represented in applying theory to praxis

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Participation in Consultation/Online Petition and Rationale (2500 words) or Short Letter and Essay (2500 words)

  5. DEVELOPING RESEARCH IN THEOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY
    (Compulsory) thu526
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    THU526 functions as an essential step-up module enabling students to consolidate their learning and experience as well promoting them to become independent learners. The module’s ethos is to encourage confidence, resilience and independence in their understanding and application of critical methodologies. Time will be spent enhancing academic and critical thinking skills and providing students with an array of tools (transferrable skills) that will prepare and empower them for their chosen career paths, whether that is outside HE or in postgraduate study. In this way, the module acts as a bridge between level 5 and level 6, and alongside PLU404 and PLU512 embeds theology and philosophy within contemporary ‘real world’ scenarios that demonstrates to students the applicability of theology and philosophy to the employment market as well as encouraging an awareness of the transferrable skills that they can offer to future employers.   

     

    THU525 brings students up to date with the chronological journey of theological and philosophical thought. THU526 switches that focus from critical theories to contemporary issues. This will provide the students with the opportunity to begin to take control of their studies within a structured and supported environment; key skills for their dissertation year. Students will be expected to apply at least one theological and philosophical approach to a contemporary issue of their choosing (from a range of topics provided for them. For example; gender, environment, euthanasia, social justice). The module is designed to consolidate knowledge and skills, encourage and promote synoptic strategies, identify how generic and subject-specific graduate skills relate to the working environment, and develop skills in applying theological and philosophical critical approaches to the issue/question of their choice. At each stage of this process, they will be given key skill-building sessions that are appropriate. The module’s flexibility allows the lead tutor to tailor these sessions to suit the group, however, sessions could include; intermediate/advanced essay writing, grammar workshops, project planning, negotiation and collaborative working, enhanced research skills, research ethics.

     

    Assessment comprises a portfolio of three tasks that reflects the trajectory of this module and is directly related to research process. These could include a research proposal, conference paper, evaluative statement of research findings. This allows students to creatively perfect and showcase their skills as well as preparing them for their dissertations and THU615.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 24.00 Independent   : 76.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Engage critically with the process of theological and philosophical research and writing.
    • Explore a range of contemporary critical frameworks valuable for theological research.
    • Develop advanced critical reading approaches to foundational texts from a variety of modern and contemporary approaches.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Develop a sense of the different vocabularies and conceptual frameworks of theology today.
    • Read, discuss and compare primary and secondary material and evaluate its significance in the development of theology.
    • Identify key social and political dimensions of theological discourse.
    • Research, write, and deliver concise written expository pieces including the preparation of an initial research proposal for the final year dissertation.
    • Gain a detailed knowledge of a range of contemporary critical approaches to theological writing.
    • Apply a range of critical approaches in their close reading and analysis of texts.
    • Develop their ability to use critical and analytical terminology and appropriate scholarly citation.
    • Present cogent and persuasive arguments, orally and in writing, which are appropriately informed by theoretical approaches.
    • Develop advanced literacy and communication skills and the ability to apply these to create work that is coherently structured.
    • Learn advanced research skills including the ability to acquire, use, evaluate and interpret complex information from diverse sources and to synthesize such material.
    • Develop their productivity by showing their ability to follow advice, act independently, manage their time, plan and organize their workload to meet deadlines and to reflect upon their own learning, making effective use of feedback to facilitate improvements in their own performances.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Portfolio of Short Theological and Philosophical Related Tasks (1800 words)

  6. TWENTIETH CENTURY THEOLOGY AND PHILSOPHY
    (Compulsory) thu518
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    In this module you will explore how being human might be imagined in terms of our capacity to respond to the encounter with the other. Through a study of major movements such as existentialism, Marxism, neo-orthodoxy and liberation theology, you will assess how twentieth century philosophers and theologians have responded to modernity. This will underpin an assessment of how more contemporary voices from the margins, such as British black theology, queer theory, disability theology and feminist philosophy have challenged and resisted accepted models of God and humanity. In this way, you will have the chance to evaluate the way that theology and philosophy is subverted and renewed by people who refuse to subscribe to more mainstream accepted beliefs. 

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Develop an understanding of some of the key movements in twentieth century theology and philosophy

    • Encourage an awareness of the contribution of radical thought to contemporary theology and philosophy

    • Develop the student’s knowledge of the implications for theological anthropology of the shift from modernity to postmodernity

    • Develop the student’s own carefully evaluated critical standpoint.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Read, discuss and compare primary and secondary material from the twentieth century, analysing and evaluating its significance for contemporary developments in philosophy and theology

    • Critically assess the mainstream theological and philosophical responses to modernity

    • Outline and evaluate the influence that radical thought has had on philosophical and theological anthropologies, focussing on a number of different case studies and recognising competing claims about what is ‘correct belief.’

    • Develop their own critically reflective theological anthropology and evaluate its practical and theoretical implications.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 40% Portfolio of Tasks and Reflections (2000 words or equivalent)

    Component 2 - 60% Essay (2000 words)

  7. RELIGIOUS EDUCATION FOR THE 21ST CENTURY
    (Optional) thu516
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module aims to develop knowledge & understanding for students that have a particular interest in RE through identifying current issues raised in government reports and addressing challenges ahead as outlined by professional RE bodies. The module will examine research to investigate factors influencing the delivery of RE in schools and the impact this holds for pupil understanding. Through exploration of recent recommendations by professional bodies for the ongoing development of RE, as a statutory curriculum subject, students will be equipped for any future careers involving this subject area as well as developing a range of transferable skills.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Develop a thorough understanding of the position of RE in schools and the way in which the subject is delivered;

    • Evaluate particular issues regarding the current context for delivery of RE in the classroom;

    • Critically reflect on the challenges facing RE and how this may affect the future development of the subject;

    • Develop research skills through exploration of key issues in the delivery of RE in the primary/secondary school.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of their understanding of the current position of RE in schools          

    • Identify and evaluate the main factors and challenges affecting the subject today

    • Effectively research a key issue in RE

    • Discuss issues from a range of viewpoints, demonstrating sensitivity to the different parties involved and an awareness of the complexity of the field

    • Analyse appropriate research and documents in relation to issues in RE

    • Apply findings from research into issues in RE and suggest possible ways in which these could be addressed in school and beyond

    • Demonstrate in written and verbal communication a clear, logical, structured and well-researched approach to the issues

    • During group discussions display an awareness of differing views and sensitivity to different opinions

    • Critically evaluate their own understanding and approaches to issues in RE and identify areas for improvement.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 40% Self Evaluation/Reflection (1000 words)

    Component 2 - 60% Research Project (3000 words)

  8. SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT IN SCHOOL AND BEYOND
    (Optional) thu517
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module considers the question of spiritual and faith development of children within primary/secondary schools and the links that can be made to the wider area of SMSC (Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural). Through RE it will also examine world views alongside religious understanding of spirituality. Students will examine theoretical frameworks for moral and spiritual development within the context of theories of child development in general. School-related sessions will explore PSHE (Personal, Social and Health Education), equality and diversity, wellbeing, and wider issues such as whether moral and spiritual development can be assessed and the implementation of SMSC across the curriculum. More general issues covered include discussions about what spirituality is and if it is different from religion, various forms of religious and non-religious spirituality, and the connection between spirituality and identity. As well as those interested in teaching this module will also be of interest to those working in adult education, in informal educational settings, and in community work.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Critically understand the possibilities to evaluate opportunities for spiritual development within schools and links that can be made to the wellbeing of the whole child in preparation for becoming a member of society;

    • Analyse theories of child development as they pertain to SMSC development;

    • Investigate relevant issues of spirituality as well as implementation of SMSC, approaches to PSHE, and equality & diversity;

    • Explore faith development, spirituality and world views within a diversity of communities;

    • Explore development of values and a sense of spirituality from those perspectives beyond established faith systems.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Critically reflect upon spiritual understanding of pupils through RE and other areas of the curriculum;       

    • Critically analyse and synthesize their understanding of faith development and world views in relation to education for spirituality;

    • Critically analyse SMSC development within schools alongside general theories of child development;

    • Research and investigate issues of SMSC education considering a range of viewpoints.

    • Present and critically discuss theories about SMSC from a range of perspectives

    • Analyse the use of a range of appropriate assessment methods

    • Critically analyse a range of planning and teaching approaches

    • Synthesize and present an informed and critical perspective to debates about the nature of spiritual development within a national and global context

    • Communicate clearly to peer members and academic staff, using a variety of media, the importance of a fully rounded approach to personal development for wellbeing.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Design and Create Digital Resource (Group Assignment, 2000 word equivalent)

    Component 2 - 50% Critical Summary and Evaluation of Academic Article (1200 words)

  9. EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE
    (Optional) thu505
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Using canonical and non-canonical writings from the first and second centuries C.E. as primary sources, students explore, through its own words, the progression of Christianity from its emergence as a small Jewish movement within sectarian Second Temple Judaism to its struggle in renegotiating its identity and place within the Roman Empire as a distinct religious voice. In doing so, this module consolidates and develops core subject knowledge and skills introduced in THU406 (Reading Sacred Texts). It also acts as a bridge between biblical studies and other modules within the programme by providing a social, religious and geo-political context to early Christian thought, expressed in its writings, and how context influences (and is influenced by) Christian tradition and praxis and thought. 

     

    There will be a particular focus on the development of the early church at the time of Paul, and the practical, ethical and doctrinal difficulties faced by the Christian communities he founded as recorded in his letters and the Acts of the Apostles. Students will be encouraged to actively engage in analysis and interpretation of the set texts of the major Pauline letters and the Acts of the Apostles. They will be required to locate these writings firmly in their socio-historical context, thereby developing their knowledge of the social, political and religious world of first century Judaism and the Roman Empire. Topics covered in the module include, early Christian theologies of salvation, christologies, eschatological expectations, community cohesion and identity, relations with Judaism, and ethical issues such as the role of women, attitudes to sex, and wealth and poverty. A key element of this module is introducing students to the multiple voices within Christianity at the time and the way modern readers can identify and contextualise them.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Develop the students’ knowledge and understanding of the history and theology of the early Christian movement
    • Develop the students’ understanding of the historical, political and religious background of the New Testament and of the importance of this for biblical interpretation
    • Deepen the students’ knowledge and understanding of some of the key texts in the early Christian literary corpus, especially the writings of Paul
    • Develop the students’ ability to critically analyse biblical texts from a variety of interpretational perspectives.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Demonstrate a sound knowledge and understanding of a range of early Christian texts
    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the history of the early Christian movement and its first century context
    • Offer informed comment on the religious, social and political background of selected New Testament texts
    • Demonstrate a critical and empathetic understanding of the beliefs, practices and ethical values of the early Christians
    • Develop their skills of critically analysing primary religious texts from a variety of perspectives
    • Develop their skills of academic writing
    • Use the biblical commentary format fluently and effectively.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 40% Essay (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 60% Commentary (2500 words)

  10. TEXT, CULTURE AND INTERPRETATION
    (Optional) thu506
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Focusing on the Jewish and Christian Bible and examples of its use within contemporary settings (e.g. politics, art, popular culture, social media, inter and intra religious dialogue), this module investigates the relationship between the text and its users. Building on a number of questions and challenges posed in THU406, the module explores in greater depth issues relating to genre and textual reception. Specific emphasis is made on the ways in which biblical texts inform and shape debate as well as how the context in which texts are used can contribute to changes in the way they are understood. The selected texts used throughout the module represent the major literary genres found within the Bible (e.g. satire, prophecy, apocalyptic, wisdom).

     

    Students will look at a range of examples of biblical texts being used within contemporary settings (religious and secular). These will then be explored in relation to their original historical contexts and their subsequent development within Hebrew and Christian biblical and post-biblical traditions. Students are then invited to identify synchronic and diachronic challenges to the reading of texts across different time and cultural contexts and how this relates to the process of translations this might pose.

     

    This provides the lenses through which contemporary uses of these texts are then assessed. Students will be able to reflect critically on the reception history of biblical texts (e.g. in literature and art, and the reuse within the Bible itself of older written and oral traditions), on their use in current ethical debates (e.g. social justice, gender equality), and on the issues surrounding the task of bible translation.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Deepen the students’ knowledge and understanding of the theological sub-discipline of biblical studies

    • Develop the students’ ability to analyse from a variety of hermeneutical perspectives the primary religious texts of the Jewish and Christian Bible

    • Foster an appreciation of the connections between biblical texts and the reuse within the Bible and the faith traditions of Christianity and Judaism of older traditions

    • Develop an understanding and appreciation of the Bible as a translated text with special emphasis upon synchronic and diachronic challenges encountered during translation process.

    • Develop in students an appreciation of the relationship between biblical texts and contemporary cultural and ethical debates.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Demonstrate a sound knowledge and understanding of a range of biblical texts and genres.

    • Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of some contemporary critical hermeneutical perspectives, their aims and application.

    • Identify appropriate methods of readings for texts within specific contexts and, where appropriate, to apply them.

    • Relate biblical texts to one another and to wider (historical and contemporary) ethical and/or cultural issues

    • Develop their skills of critically analysing primary religious texts

    • Deepen their sensitivity to the complexity of religious language and experience as captured in the sacred texts of some of the world’s major religions

    • Demonstrate an appreciation of the challenges posed by translating a text from one language, culture and historical context to another

    • Recognise and critically discuss the implications of using a translated/negotiated text to theology and Christian tradition

    • Develop their skills of independent learning and research

    • Write a fluent and coherent exegetical essay.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Exegetical Essay (4000 words)

  1. DISSERTATION IN THEOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY
    (Compulsory) thu620
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This double module promotes the acquisition of in-depth and advanced subject knowledge and understanding, and fosters critical engagement with theological and/or philosophical issues. Building upon their interests and achievements at Levels 4 and 5, students will choose, in negotiation with tutors, a focused area of study within the broad field of Theology, Philosophy, and Religious Studies. The dissertation focus may fall within any of the areas covered within the Programme, including Christian Theology, Biblical Studies, Philosophy of Religion, Ethics and Religious Education, but is dependent on the availability of staff expertise and suitable resources as well as student interest. Students will be expected to explore their chosen topic in an independent and original manner, researching widely, developing a systematic understanding of key aspects of their field of study, and clearly demonstrating advanced analytical skills.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 12.00 Independent   : 388.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 400.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Provide a concluding point to the student’s coherent learning experience on the Theology and Philosophy programmes.

    • Facilitate the student as they produce an academically rigorous and critical approach to the study of Theology, Philosophy, and Religious Studies.

    • Support the students as they develop knowledge of themselves, their own learning, and their understanding of justice as they pursue independent research in Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies.

    • Help students to communicate the fruits of their independent learning in a coherent and cogent manner.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Describe a particular research problem in Theology, Philosophy, and Religious Studies and explain their response to that problem.

    • Demonstrate a sound, accurate and in-depth knowledge and understanding of a specific topic within the broad field of Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies

    • Organize a variety of primary and secondary sources as part of a wider programme of independent study;

    • Analyse, compare, and contrast primary and secondary sources;

    • Argue for particular readings of texts and the wider discipline, drawing on analyses of primary and secondary texts;

    • Evaluate these arguments within the wider context of the discipline;

    • Produce an extended response to the research question in the form of a long piece of academic writing.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 10% Presentation (10 minutes, 1000 word equivalent)

    Component 2 - 90% Dissertation (10,000 words)

  2. THEOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY AT WORK
    (Compulsory) thu615
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    Throughout the degree programme students have been encouraged and challenged to critically engage with issues and questions facing contemporary society. Building on THU526 (and the wider programme ethos), this module provides students with the supportive space to use the tools (skills, knowledge and experience) they have acquired throughout the degree programme in order to take on the role of theological and/or philosophical practitioners and consultants within ‘real world’ situations, and to attempt to create informed solutions to specific problems posed by local agencies, special interest groups (SIGs). This module emphasises the development of students’ employability and transferable skills and encourages them to find their place and voice in society as citizens of the 21st century. A key element of the assessment is that it provides future employers with evidence of these skills and the relevance of the subject to their career choice.   

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Engage critically with the process of theological and philosophical research and writing.
    • Work collaboratively and creatively with third party agencies/groups to apply theological and/or philosophical approaches to a specific local or national issue.
    • Evaluate and respond to criticisms and suggestions made by third party groups to initial presentation and use them as a basis for further research.
    • Develop and present a critically evaluated response to that issue using a register appropriate to the intended audience.
    • Provide a transition between undergraduate and graduate level working environments.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Provide evidence of collaborative work with peers, university staff and third party groups.         

    • Demonstrate an understanding of the use of Philosophy and Theology in the working environment and how transferrable graduate skills are used in the workplace. 

    • Provide evidence of critical creativity and an ability to work and communicate at various registers appropriate to the consultative process (academic and non-academic).

    • Provide evidence of synoptic thought and problem solving in the application of their knowledge and skills to a social or work place problem.

    • Provide evidence of the depth and breadth of their employability skills.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (5000 words or equivalent)

  3. SELF AND SOUL: QUESTIONS ABOUT METAPHYSICS
    (Optional) thu619
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module focuses on the question ‘who am I?’ and whether it is, even in principle, possible to answer it. You will have the opportunity to encounter a wide range of philosophical answers to this question including, for example, those proposed by Plato, Nietzsche, Heidegger and Wittgenstein. Through this, you will critically engage with a broad range of philosophical debates, such as those concerning the role of myth in philosophy, the relationship between human beings and the non-human world, the possibility of metaphysics, and the philosophy of dance and aesthetics. You will be encouraged to develop your own philosophical reaction to developments in post-modern philosophy and appreciate their implications for how we might understand ourselves today.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Encourage a critical appreciation for the historical development of philosophical ideas

    • Encourage a reflective engagement with contemporary developments in philosophy and the turn from modernity to post-modernity

    • Develop the student’s own philosophical perspective with regard to modern and post-modern developments in philosophy

    • Foster a thoughtful appreciation for the interrelation of philosophical, ethical and aesthetic ideas.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Show a critical knowledge of some key philosophical thinkers

    • Demonstrate a reflective understanding of some of the central features of post-modern philosophy and its relationship to modernity

    • Show an awareness of the importance of studying historical philosophers for understanding current debates in contemporary and post-modern philosophy

    • Show a critical engagement with key developments in post-modern philosophy

    • Develop a coherent reflective philosophy in response to the philosophers studied

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 30% Critical Analysis of a Key Text (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 70% Essay (2500 words)

  4. RELIGIOUS TRANSFORMATIONS IN LATE ANTIQUITY 300 CE-750CE
    (Optional) thu618
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module explores the religious transformations that occurred around the Mediterranean in the years between 200 and 800 CE. It will draw together texts and material culture to trace the histories of Christianity, Judaism and Islam through this period, contextualising them within wider social, cultural, and religious developments. During the module you will be introduced to the different interpretations of modern readers and to the varied ways that the history of Late Antique religion is also a history of the present.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • develop a sound, accurate and in-depth knowledge and understanding of the beliefs, practices, traditions, texts and history of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.

    • engage critically with the subject of the interaction between religions and society, culture, politics and ethics.

    • analyse critically and from a variety of perspectives primary religious and philosophical texts.

    • develop a sensitivity to the complexity of religious and philosophical language and experience.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • understand how the religions of Late Antiquity interacted with wider society, culture, politics, and ethics;

    • critically interpret sources from Late Antiquity (for example, texts, material artefacts, and archaeological data) and apply these sources to wider theological and historical themes;

    • read, discuss, and critically compare sources from the Late Antique world, differentiating them and relating them to wider society, culture, politics and ethics;

    • evaluate secondary sources and judge the different positions taken in them;

    • formulate their own informed and critical response to the material studied in the session;

    • work together and individually to communicate the results of these activities orally and in writing at the required graduate level.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Portfolio (4000 words)

  5. VIRTUES AND VALUES
    (Compulsory) thu604
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module enables you to explore the ways in which ancient ideas of virtues and values have been reasserted and recast by twentieth and twenty-first century philosophers. By engaging with ancient Greek texts you will have the opportunity to critically assess some of the ethical ideals upheld by this literature, such as Homer’s warrior-hero Achilles, Aeschylus’ tragic hero Agamemnon and Plato’s transcendent Forms. Evaluating the ways in which these accounts of virtue have been fundamental in shaping more modern perceptions of what it means to lead a good life found in, for example, Iris Murdoch’s account of the Good, Jean-Paul Sartre’s existentialist writings, and Martha Nussbaum’s insights about moral luck and tragic dilemmas will encourage you to critique the ideas of justice and good character promoted by our own contemporary culture.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Deepen the students’ understanding of some of the most important ancient Greek thinkers.

    • Foster an awareness of the role of context and culture in the development of ancient Greek thought.

    • Develop the students’ understanding of how some of the key themes and ideas from ancient Greek philosophy have been appropriated, critiqued and developed by contemporary philosophers.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the thought of key ancient Greek thinkers

    • Analyse and evaluate the influence of Greek ideas on contemporary philosophers

    • Demonstrate a critical appreciation of the role of context and culture in the development of ancient Greek thought

    • Engage confidently with and critique the thought of key ancient Greek and twentieth century philosophers.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 40% Essay (2000 words)

    Component 2 - 60% Assignment in Negotiated Format (2500 words equivalent)

  6. RELIGIOUS EDUCATION FOR THE 21ST CENTURY
    (Optional) thu616
    Read more

    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module aims to develop knowledge & understanding for students that have a particular interest in RE through identifying current issues raised in government reports and addressing challenges ahead as outlined by professional RE bodies. The module will examine research to investigate factors influencing the delivery of RE in schools and the impact this holds for pupil understanding. Through exploration of recent recommendations by professional bodies for the ongoing development of RE, as a statutory curriculum subject, students will be equipped for any future careers involving this subject area as well as developing a range of transferable skills.

     

     

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Develop a thorough understanding of the position of RE in schools and the way in which the subject is delivered;

    • Evaluate particular issues regarding the current context for delivery of RE in the classroom;

    • Critically reflect on the challenges facing RE and how this may affect the future development of the subject;

    • Develop research skills through exploration of key issues in the delivery of RE in the primary/secondary school.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of their understanding of the current position of RE in schools          

    • Identify and evaluate the main factors and challenges affecting the subject today

    • Effectively research a key issue in RE

    • Discuss issues from a range of viewpoints, demonstrating sensitivity to the different parties involved and an awareness of the complexity of the field

    • Analyse appropriate research and documents in relation to issues in RE

    • Apply findings from research into issues in RE and suggest possible ways in which these could be addressed in school and beyond

    • Demonstrate in written and verbal communication a clear, logical, structured and well-researched approach to the issues

    • During group discussions display an awareness of differing views and sensitivity to different opinions

    • Critically evaluate their own understanding and approaches to issues in RE and identify areas for improvement.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 40% Self Evaluation/Reflection (1000 words)

    Component 2 - 60% Research Project (4000 words)

  7. SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT IN SCHOOL AND BEYOND
    (Optional) thu617
    Read more

    MODULE SUMMARY :

     

    This module considers the question of spiritual and faith development of children within primary/secondary schools and the links that can be made to the wider area of SMSC (Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural). Through RE it will also examine world views alongside religious understanding of spirituality. Students will examine theoretical frameworks for moral and spiritual development within the context of theories of child development in general. School-related sessions will explore PSHE (Personal, Social and Health Education), equality and diversity, wellbeing, and wider issues such as whether moral and spiritual development can be assessed and the implementation of SMSC across the curriculum. More general issues covered include discussions about what spirituality is and if it is different from religion, various forms of religious and non-religious spirituality, and the connection between spirituality and identity. As well as those interested in teaching this module will also be of interest to those working in adult education, in informal educational settings, and in community work.

     

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 36.00 Independent   : 164.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Critically understand the possibilities to evaluate opportunities for spiritual development within schools and links that can be made to the wellbeing of the whole child in preparation for becoming a member of society;

    • Analyse theories of child development as they pertain to SMSC development;

    • Investigate relevant issues of spirituality as well as implementation of SMSC, approaches to PSHE, and equality & diversity;

    • Explore faith development, spirituality and world views within a diversity of communities;

    • Explore development of values and a sense of spirituality from those perspectives beyond established faith systems.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Critically reflect upon spiritual understanding of pupils through RE and other areas of the curriculum;       

    • Critically analyse and synthesize their understanding of faith development and world views in relation to education for spirituality;

    • Critically analyse SMSC development within schools alongside general theories of child development;

    • Research and investigate issues of SMSC education considering a range of viewpoints.

    • Present and critically discuss theories about SMSC from a range of perspectives

    • Analyse the use of a range of appropriate assessment methods

    • Critically analyse a range of planning and teaching approaches

    • Synthesize and present an informed and critical perspective to debates about the nature of spiritual development within a national and global context

    • Communicate clearly to peer members and academic staff, using a variety of media, the importance of a fully rounded approach to personal development for wellbeing.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Design and Create Digital Resource (Group Assignment, 2000 word equivalent)

    Component 2 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

  8. EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE
    (Optional) thu605
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    No information provided. Please inform the Quality Office of the text to be included within this section.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 0.00 Independent   : 0.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 0.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    No information provided. Please inform the Quality Office of the text to be included within this section.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    No information provided. Please inform the Quality Office of the text to be included within this section.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Essay, 2500 words

    Component 2 - 50% Textual Exegeses of Two Set Texts, 2500 words

  9. TEXT, CULTURE AND INTERPRETATION
    (Optional) thu606
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    No information provided. Please inform the Quality Office of the text to be included within this section.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled   : 0.00 Independent   : 0.00 Placement   : 0.00 Total   : 0.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    No information provided. Please inform the Quality Office of the text to be included within this section.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    No information provided. Please inform the Quality Office of the text to be included within this section.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Individual Research Project (5000 words)