History BA (Hons)

Course length: 3 years full-time

Overview

‘The network of support really does allow you to grow as a student and be ready to begin building a career’
Tom Salliss, History student
Why study History?

Studying History at Newman means choosing a more personal type of degree, where you will be part of close-knit community, working closely with academic staff who are experts in their fields.

You will study in a department that is consistently ranked highly for student satisfaction. Newman is the top university in the West Midlands for overall student satisfaction in History (NSS, 2017). 

History graduates have valuable transferable skills that make them much sought after by employers. History graduates can think critically, work independently and communicate effectively. Our students have also gone into work in the heritage sector, into law and onto postgraduate study. You could employ the skills gained throughout your degree at Newman in the education sector, as a primary or secondary school teacher.

What does the course cover?

This course will give you the opportunity to explore a very wide range of themes and geographies, allowing you to build your degree around topics that interest you. All our modules are taught by expert researchers currently working in their fields.

In your first year, you will study a range of modules focusing on Medieval, Early Modern, Modern British and American History, plus you will be introduced to the Ancient World, looking at both Greece and Rome. 

In your second year, you start building your degree to suit your interests and strengths. You will undertake a work placement, which will provide you with valuable experience and boost your employability within an area you may be considering for a career.

As you progress into your third year, you will be able to tailor your degree further by choosing from a selection of in-depth case study modules. 

How will I be assessed?

Modules are assessed through coursework, reports, presentations and research papers or examinations. We are always careful to develop modules that don’t rely solely on exams. Members of the subject area are always happy to give individual tutorials and advice on research and writing assignments. 

What makes this course noteworthy?

During the 50 years that History has been taught at Newman, we have developed a more personal type of History degree. You will be welcomed into a small and dynamic community of scholars: staff; postgraduate; and undergraduate students. You will work closely with academic staff – Newman’s History students get to know their lecturers and benefit from working closely with staff and fellow students. Our staff to student ratio is one of the best in the UK and allows our students to discuss more topics with experts. First year students are assigned a current History student as a peer mentor to further guide them through their degree. History at Newman is consistently ranked highly for student satisfaction.

Our programme is one of the broadest in the region. This allows you to study aspects of History from across four millennia. You can also build your studies around your interests. We also embrace different approaches to studying the past, from literary analysis, art history and classics.

You will benefit from our strong links with schools, businesses and local museums and heritage sites, including the Black Country Living Museum. Students frequently work in partnership with colleagues from our partners and our second-year work placement module allows students to get the most out of these connections.

Active learning is an important aspect of how we teach at Newman. There are optional fieldwork opportunities throughout the course, both to museums and heritage sites in the UK and overseas.

What careers can I consider?

A wide range of opportunities are open to you as a History graduate. Our graduates have pursued their love of history at postgraduate level, while others have successfully entered challenging professions such as social work, policing, teaching and law. Others have gone on to careers including heritage, museum, tourism and library work. Due to their wide range of skills, History graduates are some of the most sought after candidates in graduate schemes.


Newman University would like to draw your attention to our Academic Regulations. These regulations are your Terms of Reference and should be considered when making a decision to study with our institution.

Entry requirements

 

September 2018 Entry Requirements

You must achieve either at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma), or a total of 88 points from a maximum of 3 A levels.

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9 M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

5 GCSEs at grade 4/C or above including grade 5/C English or  recognised equivalents, are also required.

Fees

Fees per academic year: 2017/18 

Full-time UK/EU Students: £9,250*

Please note for 2018/19 the University reserves the right to increase fees broadly in line with increases in inflation, or to reflect changes in government funding policies or changes agreed by Parliament.

Finance and Scholarship information

Additional fees:

Optional field trips are an additional cost. The department strives to ensure that these are affordable. As an example, last year, students visited Paris for a five day trip at a cost of £379 per person, including accommodation, travel, breakfast and a coach trip to Versailles. Food beverages, local transport and entry to other historical sites were additional costs. 

A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is not required for entry into this programme, although it is in many cases required by employers before students can begin their Year 2 (level 5) work placement.  The cost of the DBS is currently £55 (including processing fee) with the option of subscribing to the update service which is currently £13 per year.  For more information on your DBS application please click here.

As a full time student, you will study a total of 120 credits each year. Credits are made up of mandatory modules and you may have a list of optional modules to choose from. Not every programme offers optional modules and when an optional module is available it will be clearly marked. All modules are listed below and you may not be required to complete all of these modules. Most modules are 20 credits and dissertations are 40 credits. Please note that not all optional modules run every year. For further information please email admissions@newman.ac.uk.

Year 1 modules


AN INTRODUCTION TO HISTORY AT UNIVERSITY


MODULE TITLE : AN INTRODUCTION TO HISTORY AT UNIVERSITY

MODULE CODE : HSU401


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module initially acts as a practical introduction and how-to survival guide for ‘apprentice historians’ and undergraduate students on a history degree course.  It equips them with tools and techniques used by historians and allows time to practice them. It also introduces students to the analysis of primary sources, to the world of professional history and to some of the theoretical approaches to the subject that have developed over the past two thousand years.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 48.00
Independent : 152.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Equip students with the tools and techniques to practise history
  • Be explicit about the behaviours and competences expected of students on a university-level academic history course.
  • Explore the use of primary sources in the study of history
  • Introduce students to the theoretical underpinnings of academic history and the world of professional history.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and other source material with a secure understanding of the relevant context and of established techniques of historical enquiry
  • Understand and critically evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the past
  • Construct historical arguments in a variety of written forms
  • Gather and retrieve written and other materials for use in study from library, electronic and other repositories
  • Critically interpret historical evidence - contemporary texts and other primary sources, secondary evidence, including the work of historians.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 60% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 40% Timed Essay (1 hour)

BECOMING AN INDEPENDENT LEARNER IN HISTORY


MODULE TITLE : BECOMING AN INDEPENDENT LEARNER IN HISTORY

MODULE CODE : HSU402


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will introduce students to the resources and skills necessary to research history with particular emphasis on the use of primary sources in both printed and digital format. The module will use, as its focus, the Norman Conquest of England and its political and cultural aftermath (c. 1050 – c. 1150). It will concentrate on the impact of this key historical event and its historiography. Through weekly lectures and primary source workshops students will build up the skills necessary for historical research whilst also introducing them to medieval history in preparation for in-depth study in years 2 and 3. This is will be supplemented with virtual learning podcasts and exercises available on Moodle.

 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 18.00
Independent : 82.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop independent learning and research skills for continual study of history.
  • Evaluate the different methods by which historical change can be studied.
  • Critically reflect on the way that history is conceptualised and examined in an academic setting.
  • Be explicit about the behaviours and competences expected of students on a university-level academic history course.
  • Explore the use of primary sources in the study of history.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and other source material with a secure understanding of the relevant context and of established techniques of historical enquiry.
  • Understand and evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the past.
  • Gather and retrieve written and other materials for use in study from library, electronic and other repositories.
  • Interpret historical evidence - contemporary texts and other primary sources, secondary evidence, including the work of historians.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Group Presentation (maximum 20 minutes)

Component 2 - 50% Primary Source Commentary (1000 words)

MODERN BRITAIN SINCE 1918


MODULE TITLE : MODERN BRITAIN SINCE 1918

MODULE CODE : HSU405


MODULE SUMMARY :

The lectures serve as a broad introduction to the history of Britain since 1918 in three distinct areas: politics, society and economics. The module enables them to study a period of established orthodoxies and resonance with contemporary political issues and to study the documentary and film evidence on which historians have made their judgements and in this way become aware of the processes involved in producing a historical interpretation.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Enable students to understand the political, social and economic history of Britain from 1918 up to the present day
  • Identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and other source material (including documentary and film evidence) on which historians have made their judgements
  • Understand and critically evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the recent past.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Appreciate the inter-relationship between three historical methods: political, social and economic, through study of the  
  • Analyse a period of established orthodoxies, newly opening discourses and resonance with  contemporary political issues
  • Study the documentary and film evidence on which historians have made their judgements and in this way become aware of the processes involved in producing a historical interpretation.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (1 hour)

INTRODUCTION TO ANCIENT HISTORY


MODULE TITLE : INTRODUCTION TO ANCIENT HISTORY

MODULE CODE : HSU406


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will introduce students to the study of Ancient History and archaeology. Students will become familiar with the basic political and cultural history of ancient Greece and Rome. They will learn to deal with various forms of primary evidence including material culture and the literary tradition, and to inform their arguments from secondary literature.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Develop students’ understanding of the history of the ancient world
  • Foster an understanding of key social, economic and political developments in ancient Greece and Rome
  • Promote students’ ability to identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and source material, using it in a critical and imaginative way, with a broad appreciation of its context in ancient history.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Display a strong understanding of the history of the ancient world
  • Identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and source material, using it in a critical and imaginative way, with a broad appreciation of its context in ancient history
  • Understand and evaluate a variety of current historical approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of the social, economic and political history of the ancient world
  • Offer some valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation
  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, including a range of ancient primary sources as well as secondary sources.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Portfolio of Sources (1200 words)

Component 2 - 60% Essay (2000 words)

TUDOR BRITAIN


MODULE TITLE : TUDOR BRITAIN

MODULE CODE : HSU407


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will introduce students to the study of Tudor Britain. Students will become familiar with the basic political and religious history of Tudor Britain. They will learn to deal with various forms of primary evidence including visual sources and archival materials, and to inform their arguments from secondary literature.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop students’ understanding of the history of early modern Britain
  • Foster an understanding of key social, economic and political developments in Tudor Britain
  • Promote students’ ability to identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and source material, using it in a critical and imaginative way, with a broad appreciation of its context in early modern history.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

  • Display a strong understanding of the history of Tudor Britain
  • Identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and source material, using it in a critical and imaginative way, with a broad appreciation of its context in early modern Britain
  • Understand and evaluate a variety of current historical approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of the social, economic and political history of Tudor Britain
  • Offer some valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation
  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, including a range of primary sources as well as secondary sources.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (1 hour)

THE RISE OF MODERN AMERICA


MODULE TITLE : THE RISE OF MODERN AMERICA

MODULE CODE : HSU408


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will survey the modern domestic history of the United States, introducing students to the key events, issues and themes in order to provide framework for further study in United States history.  Although organised chronologically, the module will identify and elaborate on a number of linking themes in late nineteenth and twentieth century United States history.  These will include the tension between the United States’ rural life and values and its urban destiny; the position of women and ethnic minorities in the United States; and the role of ideology in American life and politics. The module enables students to engage with key historiographical debates in the development of modern America as well as primary source material.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:                                                     

  • Familiarise students with the key events in modern American domestic history
  • Enable students to identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and primary source material
  • Enable students to understand and evaluate the complex and shifting historiography of modern American history and encourage them to forward their own interpretations.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Relate and explain the key events in modern American domestic history
  • Identify the major historical problems arising from this history
  • Apply and engage with the relevant historiography
  • Engage with a range of primary sources
  • Appraise the historical development of the United States over the course of the late nineteenth and twentieth century
  • Demonstrate improved writing, oral presentation and small group work skills.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2000 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (1 hour)

INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING


MODULE TITLE : INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING

MODULE CODE : PLU404


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module aims to equip students with the knowledge and self-management skills to make informed choices in preparing for work placement and the transition to employment or further study on graduation.  

Learners will be provided with the opportunities to develop awareness of the workplace, identify different career and study options, recognise and articulate their own experience, accomplishments and talents and plan and implement career management strategies for the short and long term.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 12.00
Independent : 88.00
Placement :
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Support students in developing informed choices about the career pathways available to them, in relation to their subject choices.
  • Prepare students for work-based learning and the application / exploration of subject knowledge in the workplace.

  • Encourage students to make connections between their learning, placement choice, future job aspirations and contribution to society.

  • Enable students to build confidence in securing work placements and future employment.

  • Support students in reflecting upon their preparation for their work placement and future employment.  

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

  1. Examine how their experiences, accomplishments, and abilities relate to employer expectations.

  2. Demonstrate engagement with, and an understanding of, graduate employment pathways and employability issues relating to their own career aspirations.

  3. Research organisations for the purposes of securing a work placement.

  4. Reflect upon their learning and development.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Reflective Essay and Appendix, 2000 words

Year 2 modules


THEORY AND METHOD IN HISTORY


MODULE TITLE : THEORY AND METHOD IN HISTORY

MODULE CODE : HSU500


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module explores some of key developments in the scholarship of history as an academic discipline by surveying a variety of approaches used in constructing and interpreting the past. It will focus on what the historian can claim to know, the post-modernist challenge, and seek to engage students in methodological debates. 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Explore a variety of contemporary approaches to constructing and interpreting the past (e.g. Marxist, feminist, cultural, post-modernist).
  • Offer valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:  

  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data.
  • Communicate clearly, coherently and with structure in writing.
  • Communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in speech appropriate to the audience.
  • Use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for history.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Group Poster Presentation (20 minutes)

19TH CENTURY EUROPE: POLITICS, GENDER AND SOCIETY


MODULE TITLE : 19TH CENTURY EUROPE: POLITICS, GENDER AND SOCIETY

MODULE CODE : HSU503


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module approaches the history of Europe in the 19th century comparatively, examining key transformations in politics, economics and social formation in France, Germany and Italy.  It also explores the changes in gender relations and women’s experience of, participation in and contribution to European history during this century.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to develop: 

  • A command of the history of key social, economic, political and gender shifts in nineteenth century Europe.
  • A command of the history of internal developments in France, Germany and Italy.
  • An introduction to key concepts and milestones in the history of European women during the nineteenth century.
  • An understanding of, and the ability to evaluate, a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of the social, economic, political and gender history of Nineteenth Century Europe.
  • The ability to offer valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation
  • The ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data.
  • The ability to work as part of a team, dividing tasks
  • The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in speech appropriate to the audience
  • The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in writing
  • The ability to use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for history.
  • The ability to manipulate and interpret a range of numerical data.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Command the history of key social, economic and political developments in Nineteenth Century Europe, including key internal developments and contribution of women in France, Germany and Italy.
  • Understand and evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of the social, economic, political and gender history of Nineteenth Century Europe.
  • Offer valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation
  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data.
  • Communicate clearly, coherently and with structure in writing.
  • Communicate clearly, coherently, and with structure in speech appropriate to the audience.
  • Use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for history.
  • Manipulate and interpret a range of numerical data.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Book Review (1000 words)

Component 2 - 60% Examination (2 hours)

THE MAKING OF THE MODERN WORLD 1945 - 2001


MODULE TITLE : THE MAKING OF THE MODERN WORLD 1945 - 2001

MODULE CODE : HSU506


MODULE SUMMARY :

The module will introduce students to the main historical features of the contemporary world since 1945. Students will explore international relations during the Cold War and post-Cold War era, with a particular focus on US foreign policy. Throughout the module, students will engage with the major historiographical debates including containment, decision making in during the Cuban Missile Crisis, US involvement in Vietnam, Carter’s foreign policy and the post-Cold War debates over the ‘end of history’. Students will make extensive use of primary source material available online, particularly from new archival sources.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Familiarise students with the main historical features of the contemporary world since 1945, with a particular focus on US foreign policy
  • Enable students to understand and engage with critical evaluation of different approaches to constructing and interpreting the past
  • Enable students to offer valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation
  • Enable students to construct coherent and sustained arguments using a wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data
  • Develop students’ ability to work as part of a team and their ability to communicate clearly, coherently and with structure in speech and in writing. 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Relate and explain the key historical events of the Cold War and post-Cold War era
  • Critically engage with a range of primary source material
  • Develop the ability to apply and engage with the relevant historiography
  • Engage with debates about the causes, conduct and conclusion of the Cold War
  • Engage with debates about the post-Cold War world, including the ‘end of history’ and the development of a ‘new world order’
  • Appraise the development of US foreign policy from 1945 to 2001
  • Demonstrate improved writing and oral presentation skills.

 

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Group Presentation (30 minutes)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

SCHOLARSHIP AND METHOD IN HISTORY


MODULE TITLE : SCHOLARSHIP AND METHOD IN HISTORY

MODULE CODE : HSU520


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module explores some of key developments in the scholarship of history as an academic discipline by seeking to engage students in methodological and historiographical debates (some of which will be based on current staff research). This module is also concerned with analysing and critically evaluating specific topics in the historical literature by focussing on the practice of reviewing. 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 24.00
Independent : 76.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  100.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Investigate the means whereby professional historians engage in scholarly debate.
  • Introduce students to the development of historiography in their chosen specialist field.

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:  

  • Understand, explore and critique a specialist field of historical scholarship understanding differences in approach, methodology and argument.
  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence.
  • Analyse and critically evaluate specific topics in the historical literature by focussing on the process of reviewing.
  • Offer valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation.
  • Communicate clearly, coherently and with structure in writing.
  • Communicate clearly, coherently and with structure in speech in a seminar environment.
  • Use word-processing, the University Virtual Learning Environment (Moodle) and library catalogue effectively. Students will become familiar with other electronic sources of information for history.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 100% Review Essay (3000 words)

WORK PLACEMENT


MODULE TITLE : WORK PLACEMENT

MODULE CODE : PLU502


MODULE SUMMARY :

This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 10.00
Independent : 90.00
Placement : 100.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement in a workplace setting.

  • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement and of their independent learning throughout the experience.

  • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.

  • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.

  • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to: 

  1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.

  2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.

  3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.

  4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - % PLACEMENT REGISTRATION FORM

Component 2 - 60% WORK PLACEMENT REFLECTION (2500 WORDS)

Component 3 - 40% WORK PLACEMENT EVALUATION: DIGITAL RESOURCE (1500 WORDS EQUIVALENT)

POWER AND IDENTITY IN LATE MEDIEVAL ENGLAND, 1170-1485 - optional module


MODULE TITLE : POWER AND IDENTITY IN LATE MEDIEVAL ENGLAND, 1170-1485

MODULE CODE : HSU510


MODULE SUMMARY :

This is a research-led module which expands on the structure of a traditional survey course focusing on the later middle ages. By focusing on two of the most important themes of recent medieval historiography – power and identity – this module effectively combines substantial chronological content with close documentary study of primary sources. This module is taught by weekly lectures which focus alternately on the connected themes of power and identity combining topics such as the contest between religious and secular power and the nature and expression of English Catholicism. Other central topics include royal power and gender identity; peasant power and the development of the English language; the power of the nobility and the development of a legal society; conflict and conquest and the English landscape. These lectures are supplemented with student-led seminar discussions and primary source workshops. In addition to this there will be two practical skills workshops for essay and exam preparation. This module offers a strong foundation for modules in year 3, notably HSU601 and any future medieval options. It also has strong historiographical links with the early modern modules HSU504 and HSU605.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 33.00
Independent : 167.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Develop a critical understanding of late medieval England from the death of Becket to the emergence of the Tudor dynasty.

  • Enable students to understand and critically evaluate recent historiographical trends in medieval study based on a cultural reading of the past.

  • Identify, analyse and evaluate primary source material including documentary and literary sources, historical narratives, letters and theological tracts alongside archaeological and material evidence.

  • Understand the theoretical concepts of power and national identity and how the medieval past has been used (and misused) in the debates of the present.

     

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Understand the complexity and variety of the later middle ages.

  • Challenge common historical stereotypes which are founded on a negative reading of the past. 

  • Engage with a range of primary sources.

  • Develop independent research skills.

  • Produce a formal written essay and improve writing skills.

  • Develop notetaking and revision techniques for exam preparation.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (2500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (2 hours)

GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD - optional module


MODULE TITLE : GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

MODULE CODE : HSU505


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will introduce students to the study of gender, sexuality and women’s history in the ancient world. Students will examine theoretical approaches to gender studies and explore concepts of gender and aspects of women’s history in ancient Greece and Rome.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

  • Develop students’ understanding of the women’s history and gender studies in the ancient world
  • Foster an understanding of key theoretical concepts in gender studies and women’s history
  • Promote students’ ability to identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and source material, using it in a critical and imaginative way, with a broad appreciation of its context in women’s history and gender studies in ancient history.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

  • Display a strong understanding of the women’s history and gender studies in the ancient world
  • Identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and source material, using it in a critical and imaginative way, with a broad appreciation of its context in women’s history and gender studies in the ancient world
  • Understand and evaluate a variety of current historical approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of women’s history and gender studies in ancient history
  • Offer some valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation
  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, including a range of ancient primary sources as well as secondary sources.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Source Analysis (1500 words)

Component 2 - 60% Essay (3000 words)

THE BRITISH CIVIL WARS - optional module


MODULE TITLE : THE BRITISH CIVIL WARS

MODULE CODE : HSU504


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module covers a fundamental period in the political and cultural development of Britain – the Civil Wars of 1638-1651 and the subsequent Interregnum. The module seeks to develop an understanding of these complex events and explore their impacts through primary sources, images, key events and the lives of individuals. We will concentrate on the political and religious impact of the wars with particular focus on the locality, Scotland and Ireland.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to develop: 

  • An understanding of the history of the key political, social, cultural and religious changes in Britain between 1638 and 1660
  • An understanding of, and the ability to evaluate, a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of British history, 1638-1660
  • The ability to offer valid solutions to historical problems using a range of historical evidence and showing some awareness of the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation
  • The ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Engage with a complex historiographic debate and offer their own perspectives through engagement with primary sources
  • Communicate clearly, coherently and with structure in writing.
  • Use word-processing, the University Intranet and library catalogue effectively, and become familiar with other electronic sources of information for history.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Source Analysis (1500 words)

Component 2 - 60% Essay (2000 words)

THE ENGLISH CATHEDRAL (RELIGION AND SOCIETY) - optional module


MODULE TITLE : THE ENGLISH CATHEDRAL (RELIGION AND SOCIETY)

MODULE CODE : HSU508


MODULE SUMMARY :

The module will be taught in an intensive field study mode, based on a series of visits to regional Cathedrals and Minsters where there will be an opportunity to study the religious culture of past societies at different sites. There will be a briefing session beforehand to introduce the aims of the module to the participants and to deal with practical issues. During the visit there will be lectures, workshops and guided visits to places of importance. Students will plan and carry out practical research related to their chosen topics and will give presentations and prepare final assessment tasks.

Students taking this module and HSU608 will attend the field visits together, but the preparation sessions will be differentiated as will the assessment tasks.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 50.00
Independent : 150.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop students’ command of key aspects of the cultural and social history of one period of 2nd Millennium English History
  • Enable students to identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and other source material with a secure understanding of the relevant context and of established techniques of historical enquiry
  • Provide opportunities for students to gather, sort and synthesize historical data on a variety of different historical themes and issues.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Communicate clearly, coherently, fluently and with structure in speech appropriate to the audience
  • Communicate clearly, coherently, fluently and with structure in writing, and employ the standard referencing techniques of the discipline
  • Use digital technologies proficiently and appropriately (word-processing, electronic information catalogues, etc.).

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Group Oral Presentation (25 minutes)

Component 2 - 50% Illustrated Essay/Product (3000 words or equivalent)

Year 3 modules


DISSERTATION


MODULE TITLE : DISSERTATION

MODULE CODE : HSU601


MODULE SUMMARY :

This double module is a tutored project in which the student conceives, plans, researches and executes a lengthy piece of historical writing on a self-chosen theme or topic, involving mainly secondary but including some primary evidence.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to develop: 

  • A command of a body of historical knowledge, defined by their chosen topic
  • The ability to identify, analyse and critically evaluate historical texts and other source material with a secure understanding of the relevant context and of established techniques of historical enquiry
  • An understanding of, and the ability to critically to evaluate, a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the past
  • The ability to offer apt and convincing solutions to historical problems (some of which will be based on current research), using an appropriate range of historical evidence, and which recognise the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation
  • The ability to successfully gather, sort and synthesise a large amount of historical data
  • The ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data, if appropriate
  • The ability to plan and execute complex tasks within a given time-frame
  • The ability to work autonomously, setting goals and deadlines as appropriate in order to complete set tasks
  • The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, fluently and with structure in writing employing the standard referencing techniques of the discipline
  • The ability to use a variety of information technologies proficiently and appropriately, including word-processing, electronic information catalogues and the internet.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Command a body of historical knowledge, defined by their chosen topic.
  • Identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and other source material with a secure understanding of the relevant context and of established techniques of historical enquiry.
  • Understand and critically evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the past.
  • Offer apt and convincing solutions to historical problems (some of which will be based on current research), using an appropriate range of historical evidence, and which recognise the limits of possible knowledge in a given situation.
  • Successfully gather, sort and synthesise a large amount of historical data.
  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data, if appropriate.
  • Plan and execute complex tasks within a given time-frame.
  • Work autonomously, setting goals and deadlines as appropriate in order to complete set tasks.
  • Communicate clearly, fluently, coherently and with structure in writing appropriate to the audience, and employ the standard referencing techniques of the discipline.
  • Use a variety of information technologies proficiently and appropriately (word-processing, electronic information catalogues, e-mail and the internet).

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 10% Dissertation Literature Review (2000 words)

Component 2 - 90% Dissertation (10000 words)

FRENCH REVOLUTION AND NAPOLEON - optional module


MODULE TITLE : FRENCH REVOLUTION AND NAPOLEON

MODULE CODE : HSU603


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module examines a formative event in Europe's history and one with ramifications for the modern world: the French Revolution and its Napoleonic aftermath.  Students will be asked to form a view on the complex debates about the origins and impact of the Revolution and Napoleonic Empire and will engage with evidence in the form of translated primary sources.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop a critical understanding of the history of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods in French history, within a European context
  • The ability to identify, analyse and critically evaluate historical texts and other primary data (in translated form) relating to the French Revolution and Napoleonic periods with a secure understanding of the relevant context and of established techniques of historical enquiry
  • An understanding of, and the ability to critically evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods
  • The ability successfully to gather, sort and synthesise historical data on a range of themes within the period of study
  • The ability to construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data
  • The ability to communicate clearly, coherently, fluently and with structure in writing, and employ the standard referencing techniques of the discipline
  • The ability to use a variety of information technologies proficiently and appropriately including word-processing, electronic information catalogues and the Intranet.
  • The ability to manipulate and interpret a range of complex numerical data.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Command the history of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods in French history, within a European context
  • Identify, analyse and critically evaluate historical texts and other primary data (in translated form) relating to the French Revolution and Napoleonic periods with a secure understanding of the relevant context and of established techniques of historical enquiry
  • Understand and critically evaluate a variety of approaches to constructing and interpreting the Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods
  • Successfully to gather, sort and synthesise historical data on a range of themes within the period of study
  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments using an appropriately wide range of evidence, largely from secondary sources, but including some primary data
  • Communicate clearly, coherently fluently and with structure in writing and employ the standard referencing techniques of the discipline
  • Use a variety of information technologies proficiently and appropriately including word-processing, electronic information catalogues and the Intranet.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (3500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (3 hours)

VICTORIAN BRITAIN - optional module


MODULE TITLE : VICTORIAN BRITAIN

MODULE CODE : HSU604


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will involve students in engagement with one of the most contentious and complex periods in Britain’s history, focusing on the issues and debates in the social and political history of the period. They will gain familiarity with this key period in the development of modern Britain and be able to set this in its wider context.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Secure a command of aspects of life and events in Victorian Britain including social, political and economic features
  • Critical analysis various approaches to constructing and interpreting the Victorian period
  • Offer solutions to key historical problems in the Victorian periods, using a range of historical evidence, both visual and documentary
  • Appreciate and assemble coherent arguments in essay and examination form based on valid historical evidence and informed by the judgements of historians

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  1. Understand, and critically evaluate different approaches to constructing and            interpreting the Victorian era, the importance of events, the pace and complexity of change and continuity.

  2. Construct coherent arguments using a range of evidence, largely from historians,    but including some primary historical evidence

  3. Experience a variety of learning environments: including archival and fieldwork,      group work, presentation and source analysis

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (3500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (3 hours)

PROTEST, PIETY AND THE PARISH: BRITAIN AND IRELAND C 1600-1660 - optional module


MODULE TITLE : PROTEST, PIETY AND THE PARISH: BRITAIN AND IRELAND C 1600-1660

MODULE CODE : HSU605


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module provides an insight into the day-to-day lives of men and women in seventeenth-century Britain and Ireland. Building on students’ study of Tudor history and/or the British Civil Wars, the module develops student understanding of social and cultural history in the early modern period. Students will examine different aspects of the lifecycle in the early modern parish - from birth in the first week to death and post-mortem rituals in the final session.

 

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop students’ understanding of early modern British social history
  • Foster an understanding of key theoretical concepts in the study of social and cultural history
  • Promote students’ ability to identify, analyse and evaluate both primary texts and secondary literature on the subject of social and cultural history

 

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

 Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Construct coherent, convincing and sustained arguments using an appropriately wide range of primary and secondary literature
  • Display a strong understanding of early modern Britain and theoretical approaches to the study of social and cultural history
  • Identify, analyse and evaluate primary texts and secondary literature on social and cultural history, using it in a critical and imaginative way, with a broad appreciation of context
  • Understand and evaluate a variety of current approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of social and cultural history in the early modern British context

 

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Essay (3500 words)

Component 2 - 50% Examination (3 hours)

PERSONALITY AND DISORDER IN 12TH CENTURY ENGLAND - optional module


MODULE TITLE : PERSONALITY AND DISORDER IN 12TH CENTURY ENGLAND

MODULE CODE : HSU611


MODULE SUMMARY :

This is a research-led module which focuses on twelfth-century England, particularly the years 1135-1154. The period known as the Anarchy was a civil war which was noted by contemporaries for its violence and lawlessness. This was, and continues to be, blamed on the personalities of two rival claimants to the English throne: Matilda and Stephen. By focusing on the Anarchy in England students will also be introduced to two grand narratives of European historiography, notably the formation of the individual during the twelfth-century renaissance and the breakdown of public order which characterised the post-Carolingian period. 

 

This conceptual module will challenge Level 6 students with theoretical issues including how far historians should consider personality when assessing causation and change. It will also allow students to engage with current research into the concept of power and authority in the high middle ages.

 

This module is taught by weekly classes and student-led seminar discussions. This will be supplemented by weekly primary source workshops as students engage with a range of material including chronicles, hagiographies, letters and archaeological material. In addition to this there will be two practical skills workshops for essay and exam preparation. This module is allows for a theoretical and reflective approach to studying history at Level 6. In this way it will supplement their research for HSU601.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement :
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Develop a critical understanding of the period of the Anarchy in England, 1135-54.

  • Enable students to understand and critically evaluate recent historiographical trends in medieval study based on a cultural reading of the past.

  • Enable students to identify, analyse and evaluate a range of primary source material.

  • Understand the theoretical concepts of personality, individuality and power and how they apply to the medieval past.

  • Encourage students to develop their own views of the value and meaning of historical interpretation.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Understand the complexity and variety of the high middle ages.
  • Relate and explain the key events of the Anarchy in England.
  • Apply and engage critically with the relevant historiography.
  • Critically engage with an extensive range of primary sources.
  • Develop independent research skills.
  • Produce a formal written essay and improve writing skills.
  • Develop notetaking and revision techniques for exam preparation.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% ESSAY (3000 WORDS)

Component 2 - 50% EXAMINATION

MYTH AND RELIGION IN THE ANCIENT WORLD - optional module


MODULE TITLE : MYTH AND RELIGION IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

MODULE CODE : HSU606


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will introduce students to the study of myth and religion in the ancient world. Students will examine theoretical approaches to myth and religion in ancient Greece and Rome, including theories on the nature of myth and aspects of ancient religious practice.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to: 

  • Develop students’ understanding of ancient myth and the history of ancient religion
  • Foster an understanding of key theoretical concepts in the study of ancient myth and religion
  • Promote students’ ability to identify, analyse and evaluate both primary ancient texts and secondary literature on the subject of myth and religion.

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Display a strong understanding of ancient myth and religion and theoretical approaches to the study of myth and religion
  • Identify, analyse and evaluate primary texts and secondary literature on myth and religion, using it in a critical and imaginative way, with a broad appreciation of its context
  • Understand and evaluate a variety of current approaches to constructing and interpreting aspects of myth and religion in the ancient world
  • Construct fair, coherent, convincing and sustained arguments, using an appropriately wide range of primary and secondary literature.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% INDIVIDUAL (20 MINUTES) OR PAIRED (30 MINUTES) PRESENTATION AS NUMBERS DICTATE. INDIVIDUAL (20 MINUTES) OR PAIRED (30

Component 2 - 50% ESSAY (3500 WORDS)

BLACK FREEDOM STRUGGLE - optional module


MODULE TITLE : BLACK FREEDOM STRUGGLE

MODULE CODE : HSU610


MODULE SUMMARY :

This module will explore the struggle of African Americans for their civil rights, focusing primarily on the years between 1940 and 1970. Students will make extensive use of primary source material – including protest songs, the diaries of civil rights activists and images – in their examination of the key events of the civil rights movement, including the 1957 Little Rock School Desegregation crisis, the 1962 Ole Miss crisis and 1964 Freedom Summer. The module will engage with themes and concepts including race and whiteness, class, gender, the rise and fall of non-violent direct action protest and the rise of Black Power and the new conservatism. Students will also explore key historiographical debates in considerable depth, interrogating the idea of a ‘long Civil Rights movement’, and a ‘long’ Massive Resistance. The module will also offer the opportunity to explore the broader context of the era, from life under Jim Crow in the 1940s to the impact of the Great Migration, urbanisation, the New Deal and the Great Depression, World War II and the Cold War on the development of the Civil Rights movement.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 36.00
Independent : 164.00
Placement : 0.00
Total :  200.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:                                                     

  • Familiarise students with the key events in the black freedom struggle between 1940 and 1970
  • Enable students to identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts
  • Enable students to locate, evaluate and engage with a range of primary source material
  • Enable students to understand and critically evaluate the complex and shifting historiography of civil rights movement and encourage them to forward their own interpretations

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

  • Relate and explain the social, economic and political realities of life for African Americans under Jim Crow
  • Relate and explain the key events in the black freedom struggle
  • Identify the major historical problems arising from this history
  • Apply and engage critically with the relevant historiography
  • Critically engage with an extensive range of primary sources
  • Appraise the development of African Americans’ civil and voting rights over the course of the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s
  • Demonstrate improved writing, oral presentation and small group work skills

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 40% Presentation (20 minutes, individual or 30 minutes, paired).

Component 2 - 60% Essay (3000 words)

THE ENGLISH CATHEDRAL (ARCHITECTURE AND SOCIETY) - optional module


MODULE TITLE : THE ENGLISH CATHEDRAL (ARCHITECTURE AND SOCIETY)

MODULE CODE : HSU608


MODULE SUMMARY :

The module will be taught in an intensive field study mode, based on a series of visits to regional Cathedrals and Minsters where there will be an opportunity to study the religious culture of past societies at different sites. There will be a briefing session beforehand to introduce the aims of the module to the participants and to deal with practical issues. During the visit there will be lectures, workshops and guided visits to places of importance. Students will plan and carry out practical research related to their chosen topics and will give presentations and prepare final assessment tasks.

Students taking this module and HSU508 will attend the field visits together, but the preparation sessions will be differentiated as will the assessment tasks.

CONTACT HOURS :

Scheduled : 50.00
Independent :
Placement :
Total :  50.00

MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

This module aims to:

 

  • Develop students’ command of the history of English religious architecture over the past 7 centuries

  • Enable students to identify, analyse and evaluate historical texts and other source material with a secure understanding of the relevant context and of established techniques of historical enquiry

  • Provide opportunities for students to successfully gather, sort and synthesise historical data in a field based setting

  • Demonstrate links between religious thought and practice and wider social, historical and artistic traditions in English culture

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

 

  • Offer apt and convincing solutions to historical problems, based on current research, using an appropriate range of historical evidence
  • Demonstrate a secure understanding of a complex and specialised area of historical knowledge, which is contextualised successfully.
  • Communicate clearly, coherently, fluently and with structure in speech appropriate to the audience
  • Communicate clearly, coherently, fluently and with structure in writing, and employ the standard referencing techniques of the discipline
  • Use digital technologies proficiently and appropriately (word-processing, electronic information catalogues, etc.)

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

Component 1 - 50% Individual/Paired Oral Presentation (35 minutes)

Component 2 - 50% Essay (3500 words)

Course code


V100

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