September 2022

Applied Humanities BA (Hons) - Accelerated Degree

Honours Degree, Undergraduate, September 2022

Key Details

  • Y002 Course Code
  • 2 Years
  • 96 Typical UCAS Tariff
An informal lecture delivered by Emma Folwell, Head of Introductory Programmes

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Clearing 2022

Call our Clearing hotline now to see if we can offer you a place to start this September. 

If on results day you wish to re-consider your choice and want to choose Newman University, you can apply to us over the phone, on LiveChat or through Whatsapp.

You can also join us on Saturday 20th August for an Open Day to look around the facilities and talk with subject and support staff. No need to book, simply turn up.

 

 

Find out more

Entry Requirements

You must achieve at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma; MPP at BTEC Extended Diploma) towards the total tariff.

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9-M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

Applicants who do not meet the entry requirements outlined above are strongly encouraged to contact the programme leaders via the contact details above. 

International Students
The University is not licensed by the UK Government to sponsor migrant students under the Student route and is therefore unable to accept applications from international students at present.

Applying Direct Option

You can apply direct to Newman University for the full-time route for this course if you have not previously applied to Newman University through UCAS and you are not applying to any other universities.

Simply click on this Direct Application link to do this.

September 2022 Direct Application Link 

N.B. will need to enter ‘New User’ account details when first accessing this portal.

If you have any questions regarding entry onto this course please contact our friendly and helpful admissions team via our Admissions Enquiry Form

Course Fees

The full-time course fee for September 2022 is £11,100.

The University will review tuition fees and increase fees in line with any inflationary uplift as determined by the UK Government, if permitted by law or government policy, in subsequent years of your course. It is anticipated that such increases would be linked to RPI (the Retail Price Index excluding mortgage interest payments).

 

Additional Costs

Find out more about the other additional costs associated with our undergraduate degrees. 

 

Modules

In addition to these compulsory modules, students will have the opportunity to undertake at least one optional specialist module from either English Literature, History or Theology and Philosophy.

Please be aware that, as with any course, there may be changes to the modules delivered, for information view our Changes to Programmes of Module Changes page.

Timetables: find out when information is available to students

 

  1. This module aims to equip students with the knowledge, resilience and self-management skills to make informed choices about their career. It will also act as an introduction to the multiple pathways available to graduates as they plan their transition to employment or further training. As part of this module, students will be encouraged to archive and collate material in a portfolio, as part of which they can keep a record of any professional contacts and collate relevant ideas and research material. They will reflect on the ways in which the techniques used by organisations could or should apply to their own profiles. Students will also be provided with opportunities and time to plan and implement career management strategies for the short and long term. Students will also begin developing the core digital skills that will underpin their work throughout the degree. These include information literacies, including searching, retrieving, critically evaluating information from a range of appropriate sources.
  2. Students will work to acquire key research methodologies and skills that underpin the humanities, including developing their collaborative and interdisciplinary skills. Students will consider the way in which data shapes our real and virtual worlds. They will be encouraged to take a critical view of the digital age with a long-term historical and cultural approach. Students will also consider how the increased preoccupation with our own unique political and cultural identities has promoted the perception that many people who share our world do not share our worldview. This module explores how the historical and cultural foundations of the West Midlands identity and how that might intersect with wider global narratives. Using local history and regional literature and dialect, students will be asked to identify and explore the construction of regional identities using both real and fictional personalities. Building on concept of the identity politics, students will use broad ideological and temporal frameworks to tell new narratives about their own identities. This module will serve as a way to empower students to contribute to conversations about the relationship and duties owed by individuals to civic society.
  3. Students will interrogate and unpack issues, often developed in consultation with external organisations. Students will develop their ability to work in teams and negotiate as they consider the historical, literary and philosophical context of the issues at hand. Drawing on the skills and content of the humanities subjects, students will critically analyse, research, reframe and recommend resolutions to these real-world issues, while developing their digital skills.
  1. This module investigates the increased preoccupation with our own unique political and cultural identities has promoted the perception that many people who share our world do not share our worldview. Building on the concept of civic cooperation and participation this module allows students to focus on their own development and plan. It will usually include career support and planning for final project work at level 6.
  2. Students will interrogate and unpack issues, often developed in consultation with external organisations. They will develop their ability to lead teams and negotiate as they consider the historical, literary and philosophical context of the issues. Drawing on the skills and content of the humanities subjects, students will critically analyse, research, reframe and recommend resolutions to these real-world issues, while developing their digital skills.
  3. Students on this module act as coordinators the event for their own end-of-programme conference. They will work together to design and organise a showcase event to display and advertise their combined work for the final project. They will work toward the development of a portfolio, which may include elements of reflection. In particular students will be expected to engage with the academic impact agenda.
  4. This is a 40-credit module completed over both terms. Students will work closely with a supervisor to research, plan and construct a project on a chosen topic or theme.