September 2021

Integrative Counselling Foundation Degree (BACP Accredited)

Foundation Degree, Undergraduate, September 2021

Overview

This course provides a foundational counselling qualification. It enables students to engage with several key theoretical approaches in counselling and related skills, and to learn to integrate them in ways that allow them to be effective practitioners, equipped to work in a range of settings. The course provides both professional and academic training, producing reflective practitioners who are equipped to meet the future challenges of the counselling profession. The course is accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) and subscribes to the BACP Ethical Framework (2018).

Integrative Counselling Foundation Degree – Further Information

Why study this course?

  • The course combines academic study and personal reflection with a strong focus on counselling skills and practice
  • This programme received 100% student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2018
  • The course is accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP)
  • It offers a distinctive training in integrative counselling, drawing on several core models of counselling to form an integrated framework for practice
  • On completion, you can progress to the BA (Hons) ‘Top Up’ award in Counselling Studies, thereby achieving a full Honours degree
  • The course has a strong reputation and good relationships with a range of placement providers across the region

What does this course cover?

During your first year of study you will usually attend University for taught sessions on one day per week. You will start on your journey to becoming a trained counsellor. You will do this through a balance of theory, skills practice, personal and group reflection. You will learn about two of the main theoretical models in counselling (person-centred and psychodynamic). You will also begin to practice a range of counselling skills, learn about ethical issues and dilemmas, and take part in a personal development group.

In the second year you will begin your counselling placement, once you are assessed as being ready for this step. This placement will continue throughout the rest of the programme. Alongside this, you will also start your personal therapy at least 3 months before starting on placement. Once on placement, you will also have regular clinical supervision. You will continue to attend University one day per week. In terms of taught content, year 2 includes learning about the theories of CBT and Gestalt therapies. You also learn about the counselling relationship, and how to begin to integrate different theories into a coherent model.

In the final year you will continue on placement and in supervision, and may also continue in personal therapy. You will continue to attend University one day per week. You will take modules in mental health and in working to different time contracts in counselling, including doing brief therapy. You will also complete a small research project. During this time you will also engage in clinical case discussion, a personal development group, and will continue working towards completion of your clinical hours on placement.

How will I be assessed?

There are a range of assessment methods, including:

  • Essays
  • Presentations
  • Audio-recorded counselling sessions and written commentaries on these
  • Practice log books
  • Supervisors’ reports
  • Viva

Opportunities

Graduates of this training are qualified counsellors eligible to join the BACP register. The course is also structured to facilitate students working towards individual BACP accreditation as counsellors.

Graduates can work as counsellors in a range of settings, including educational, health, workplace and voluntary services. Other career opportunities include mentoring and mental health support work.

Successful completion of the Foundation Degree can lead to further study at Newman, including our BA (Hons) ‘Top Up’ award in Counselling Studies,  our MSc Integrative Counselling & Psychotherapy Studies or MRes Human Sciences routes.

Studying and living in Birmingham

Newman University is located in Britain’s second city – Birmingham. With one of the youngest city populations in Europe, it is a vibrant and dynamic place to study.

Studying at Newman University, you have the advantage of being near to the city, but living in, or commuting to peaceful and comfortable surroundings on campus.

Dining out

Birmingham has lots of wonderful places to dine out with a range of different cuisines. Places where you can dine out include; Brindley Place, Mailbox and Hagley Road (just 10 minutes’ from Newman).

Entertainment

Whether you like to go to; the theatre, gigs or clubs, or enjoy: sports, shopping visiting art galleries or exhibitions – Birmingham will not disappoint and you will be spoilt for choice!

Location

Getting around Birmingham is easy via train, bus or by car. Birmingham has excellent transport links to the rest of Britain, making it easy for those weekend getaways!

Why not explore the city for yourself by visiting one of our Open Days?

Want to find out more about Birmingham? Then take a look at some Birmingham City Secrets.

Ask Us a Question

Counselling and Psychotherapy Open Evening

Come along to our Counselling and Psychotherapy Virtual Open Evening on Thursday 18th February to find out more about our range of Counselling and Psychotherapy programmes.

We will be holding a number of Zoom sessions where staff will deliver presentations about our suite of courses, followed by an opportunity to ask any questions that you may have.

Apply Now

Contact Details

Entry Requirements

Basic entry qualifications:

  • Newman’s Introductory Certificate in Counselling (Level 4) or a Certificate in Counselling at level 3 (or equivalent), which includes a face to face counselling skills training and theoretical understanding
  • Some experience of using these skills (such as active listening, empathy, open ended questions, responding appropriately) in a workplace or voluntary setting, such as a helping, listening or supporting relationship is expected

Additional entry requirements:

Candidates must also demonstrate

  1. Self-awareness, maturity and stability
  2. Ability to make use of and reflect upon life experience
  3. Capacity to cope with the emotional demands of the course
  4. Ability to cope with the intellectual and academic requirement
  5. Ability to form helping relationships
  6. Ability to be self-critical and use both positive and negative feedback
  7. Awareness of the nature of prejudice and oppression
  8. Awareness of issues of difference and equality
  9. Ability to recognise the need for personal and professional support
  • Competence in, or the aptitude to develop generic professional skills, including: literacy, numeracy, information technology, administrative skills, self- management skills, communication and interpersonal skills

These abilities and competencies will be tested through a formal application, numeracy* & literacy test, group task, assessed piece of work from previous counselling course and individual interview.

Example Literacy Test for Foundation Degree in Integrative Counselling 

Example Numeracy Test for Foundation Degree in Integrative Counselling. 

Newman’s Record of Prior Learning (RPcL/RPel) policy may be applied to applicants who consider they have qualifications or experience that may warrant them being granted exemption from elements of a particular course.

Applicants will be required to attend an interview, which will be arranged in the spring of each academic year.

Applicants will need to obtain an Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance prior to starting the course.  For more information on your Enhanced DBS application please click here.

 

Course Fees

Fees per academic year:
Part-time UK/EU students: £4,850*

* Fees shown are for 2021/22 academic year. The University will review tuition fees and increase fees in line with any inflationary uplift as determined by the UK Government, if permitted by law or government policy, on enrolment and in subsequent years of your course. It is anticipated that such increases would be linked to RPI (the Retail Price Index excluding mortgage interest payments).

Additional Costs 

An Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is required for entry into this programme. Find out more about completing the Enhanced DBS application form and the related additional costs that you will incur.

You will be required to join the BACP as a student member by the end of semester 1 of year 1.  The cost of the BACP membership is £82 (2020/21).

Whilst on a counselling placement during the second year, students are required to regularly attend supervision sessions from a Newman approved supervisor.  Sessions take place every fortnight (two per month) and the typical cost for a clinical supervision session is in the range of £35-55 per session (2020/21).

Over the period of this programme, you will engage in at least 40 hours of personal therapy to support self-awareness and professional practice.  The typical cost of personal therapy is in the range of £35-55 per session (2020/21).

Modules

Please be aware that, as with any course, there may be changes to the modules delivered, for information view our Changes to Programmes or Module Changes page.

Timetables: find out when information is available to students

As a part-time undergraduate student, you choose how many modules to study each year (up to a maximum of 6). To qualify for a student tuition fee loan you will need to choose at least 4 modules. A normal 3-year degree will take 4.5 years to complete if you take 6 modules per year. You will be taught alongside full-time undergraduate students.

  1. This is the initial module on the Foundation Degree programme, and as such is intended to develop the subject of counselling and consolidate counselling skills.  The main emphasis will be on therapeutic frame and the development of specific skills associated with for theoretical modalities.
  2. This module aims to give students an overview of the development of counselling theory and an understanding of the theory, philosophy and practice of counselling. Theoretical frameworks will be examined from the perspective of their application in the counselling practice (specifically modules COF512/COF514/COF517) and evidence based practice. The underpinning rationale that justifies the use of each of the models will be explored, and students will be encouraged to evaluate the usefulness of different approaches from a practical perspective.
  3. In this module students bring together learning from the previous two modules to integrate skills and theory. The module provides crucial preparation for students to start on their counselling placement. In relation to the Newman Relational Integrative Framework, this module focuses on the steps that represent the stages of the counselling process, with reference to the central pillar of relationship.
  4. This module will enable students, who at this stage will have a foundation in the core skills of counselling, to acquire an increased awareness of the ethical and professional issues involved in counselling practice. Attention will be given to the practical aspects of the profession, such as contracting, referrals, managing boundaries, as well as an appreciation of wider issues such as culture, belief systems, sexual orientation, risk assessment, collaborative working and the on-going role of supervision.
  1. This module sets out to enable students in the first part of their Professional Counselling Placement(s), to sharpen their reflective approach, demonstrating movement from theory into practice which evidences a sound Integrative Model. It will challenge them to reflect effectively on the professional and ethical dimensions to their practice in their placement. Students will be encouraged to 1demonstrate how far and in what ways they are engaged in planning their ongoing personal and professional development. This module is central and critical to counsellor training, as students move toward the practical and professional aspects of their course. It is therefore intended to be wide-ranging and to be responsive to students’ placement contexts and evolving experience.
  2. The module takes a lifespan perspective on human development. It emphasises the significance of relationships, family and socio-political context for the achievement and maintenance of individual identity. Staged and phased models of development and life-transition will be introduced and evaluate.  Emotional, cognitive, behavioural, biological and spiritual aspects of integrated self-experience and mental well-being will be considered.
  3. This module aims to give students an overview of the development of counselling theory and an understanding of the theory, philosophy and practice of counselling. Theoretical frameworks will be examined from the perspective of their application in the counselling practice (specifically module COF517) and evidence based practice. The underpinning rationale that justifies the use of each of the models will be explored, and students will be encouraged to evaluate the usefulness of different approaches from a practical perspective.
  4. The module will introduce students to research findings on factors contributing to therapeutic change and concerning the significance of the counselling relationship, modes of relating, comparison of the counselling relationship for three core approaches to counselling, issues of power in the counselling relationship, the impact for the counsellor of engaging in a counselling relationship and the relevance of these for working within the therapeutic frame.
  5. The module will synthesise and build upon the material presented in previous modules and begin the process of developing an integrative framework for counselling practice. Students will develop an understanding of case conceptualisation and begin to apply it practical case studies. The relationship between concept and practical application will be used to justify choice of elements of theory and specific interventions, where relevant. Constant reflection will form the basis of on-going evaluation and impact assessment for later application to practice.
  1. This module sets out to enable students in their Professional Counselling Practice, to sharpen their reflective approach, demonstrating movement from theory into practice related to specialist counselling contexts. It will challenge them to reflect effectively on the professional and ethical dimensions to the practice in the specific counselling area; to take on board the roles of Evidence base practice EBP and Practice based evidence PBE within a research friendly approach as they aspire to become Professional, Ethical, Reflective, Practitioners. Students will be encouraged to demonstrate how far and in what ways they are engaged in planning their on-going personal and professional development. This module is central and critical to counsellor training, as students move toward the practical and professional aspects of their course. It is therefore intended to be wide-ranging and to be responsive to the needs of the professional counselling settings.
  2. This module sets out to record the successful completion of the Professional Core of the Foundation Degree in Integrative Counselling, namely a clinical placement undertaken by students from Years 2-3. Assessment on this module requires them to provide evidence of their completion of, and learning from their placements. Whilst on placement, students’ progress is closely monitored through the personal tutorial system (attendance at personal tutorials at six monthly intervals or after 40 hours of counselling practice, whichever is sooner). They are also closely monitored on the programme through attending Clinical Supervision groups, where they regularly present and discuss their client work within a group of no more than 12 students, and gain feedback from a tutor with considerable experience as a counselling practitioner. The Clinical Supervision group tutor will also monitor progress and students’ fitness to practice throughout their time on placement, liaising with the students’ personal tutor and with the Programme Leader where necessary.
  3. This module aims to provide an overview of key perspectives on psychological and emotional distress. It includes a consideration of neurobiological contributions to the understanding of abnormal development and its psychological consequences. The module seeks to encourage students to understand mental illnesses from a clinically informed fashion, in terms of aetiology, classification and treatment. The specific manner in which fields of counselling and psychotherapy assess and manage these issues will be explored, focusing especially on the therapeutic application entailed, and the therapeutic justification for decisions. This module will also promote an appreciation of the multi-cultural and religious issues that can arise in various treatment settings, and the counselling field more broadly. Assignments are designed to develop students’ understanding of the main models of psychopathology and raise awareness of key issues in the field, while at the same time building on their analytical, evaluative and presentation skills.
  4. This module aims to enable students who already have a sound foundation in the core skills and approaches of counselling practice to set these within a time conscious approach. This covers the issues involved in working in time-conscious and time limited frames. It also entails careful re-consideration of factors such as assessment and contracting as well as temporal and relationship issues.  The module reviews the implications of time consciousness and, in particular, time limited work, for working within an integrative framework.
  5. This module deepens students understanding of the underlying principles of quantitative and qualitative research methods and, through the adoption a practical and experiential approach, to enable students to gain an understanding of the stages of carrying out a small research project. The project work will be undertaken in small groups, thereby also giving students an opportunity to further develop their skills of working in teams. Students will demonstrate their acquisition of knowledge through a formative group presentation and a summative individual research report to communicate their findings.

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