Working with Children, Young People and Families BA (Hons)

Honours Degree , Full-time

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Key Details

  • 3 Years
  • 88/96 Typical UCAS Tariff
  • L590 Course Code
  • Full Time
child counselling session

Overview

Clearing places available to start this September

Find out more about applying via our Clearing webpages or call 0121 476 1181

 

Why study this course?

Supporting children, young people and vulnerable families is an increasingly high profile area of social policy.

This course is one of a small number of Honours degree level programmes designed to give you the knowledge and skills to understand the social, economic, educational, political and cultural issues and barriers facing children, young people and families, particularly in socially disadvantaged areas.

Professionals working with children and young people are increasingly required to have formal qualifications recognising their expertise in these areas.

What does the course cover?

The course looks at social and education policy, and gives you a thorough understanding of the roles and responsibilities of agencies working with children and families including the Children’s Workforce Development Council, Social Services, Local Education Authorities, schools, third sector organisations and the Police. You will examine child development and issues surrounding childhood, family relationships and the psychology of the family and child. You will explore how society views childhood, and the challenging issues facing children and young people today, with specific reference to the experiences of children in past decades.

You will study legislation relating to education, child protection and welfare, health, and diversity. As multi-agency working is essential for the effective support of children and families you will study and evaluate models of inter-agency working, best practice in this area, professional working and collaborative operating. The complex issue of sharing and managing information, including data protection issues, will also be an important area of study. You will understand why such policies are required and how practices designed to protect vulnerable children can become potential barriers to effective collaboration, and how these barriers can be overcome. A major theme throughout the course will be listening to children and young people, making services responsive and developing strategies to enhance children’s and young people’s participation.

What makes this course distinctive?

The tutors on this course have significant experience of public policy and practice. Many are leading experts in their field with national and international profiles in the area. The course provides an opportunity to cover a range of issues and you will be encouraged to develop an area of particular expertise.

All single and combined Honours students at Newman undertake relevant placements as part of their degree, therefore full-time students can gain valuable work experience in a relevant setting and apply the theoretical knowledge gained on the course to real-life scenarios under the supervision of experienced practitioners. Relevant work experience at a high level is essential for people intending to develop their careers in this area. This is why this course has been designed to enable you to gain experience throughout your studies, which will be useful when you are seeking positions after graduation. For part-time students already working in the field the degree ensures that you are aware of the latest developments, cases and practices, and are able to relate this information to your current role or career aspirations.

How will I be assessed?

The course offers a variety of assessment to suit the experience of the module studied, and will include essays, presentations and case studies. Part-time students will relate their studies to their existing roles.

What careers can I consider after this degree?

A wide range of careers are available across a number of environments such as education, health and social care in the public, private and third sectors. Although not a social work degree, the issues covered on this course would be suitable for people considering gaining postgraduate qualifications to become a social worker. Youth work, social policy development, outreach work and working with children are also potential careers for graduates of this degree.

It is intended that graduates from this course will develop into managers working in education, health, or social care capable of dealing with multi-agency working with a range of knowledge and inter-personal skills.

Entry Requirements

September 2018 Entry Requirements

You must achieve either at least 96 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma), or a total of 88 points from a maximum of 3 A levels.

Access Students can achieve the requirements with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course. 96 UCAS Points: D21-M3-P21; D18-M9-P18; D15-M15-P15; D12-M21-P12; D9 M27-P9; D6-M33-P6; D3-M39-P3; D0-M45-P0.

5 GCSEs at grade 4/C or above including English or a recognised equivalent, are also required.

If your work placement involves working with children or vulnerable adults a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance and is required before starting any work placement.

Contact: Contact for admissions enquiries AdmissionsTel: 0121 476 1181 (Ext. 2386) Email: admissions@newman.ac.uk

Contact: Contact for course enquiries: Graham Brotherton (Programme Leader – Working with Children, Young People and Families) Tel: 0121 476 1181 (Ext. 2344) Email: g.brotherton@newman.ac.uk

Directions

Course Fees

Fees per academic year: 2018/19: Full-time Home/EU students: £9,250 *

* Fees shown are for 2018/19 academic year. The University will review tuition fees and increase fees in line with any inflationary uplift as determined by the UK Government, if permitted by law or government policy, in subsequent years of your course. It is anticipated that such increases would be linked to RPI (the Retail Price Index excluding mortgage interest payments).

Additional Costs

A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is not required for entry into this programme, although it is in many cases required by employers before students can begin their Year 2 (level 5) work placement.  Find out more about completing the DBS application form and the related additional costs.

 

Additional Information

General Academic Regulations: Terms and Conditions for students attending our courses

  1. INTRODUCTION TO WORK RELATED LEARNING
    (Compulsory) plu404
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module aims to equip students with the knowledge and self-management skills to make informed choices in preparing for work placement and the transition to employment or further study on graduation.  

    Learners will be provided with the opportunities to develop awareness of the workplace, identify different career and study options, recognise and articulate their own experience, accomplishments and talents and plan and implement career management strategies for the short and long term.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 12.00 Independent : 88.00 Placement : Total :  100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Support students in developing informed choices about the career pathways available to them, in relation to their subject choices.
    • Prepare students for work-based learning and the application / exploration of subject knowledge in the workplace.

    • Encourage students to make connections between their learning, placement choice, future job aspirations and contribution to society.

    • Enable students to build confidence in securing work placements and future employment.

    • Support students in reflecting upon their preparation for their work placement and future employment.  

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to:

    1. Examine how their experiences, accomplishments, and abilities relate to employer expectations.

    2. Demonstrate engagement with, and an understanding of, graduate employment pathways and employability issues relating to their own career aspirations.

    3. Research organisations for the purposes of securing a work placement.

    4. Reflect upon their learning and development.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Reflective Essay and Appendix, 2000 words

  2. THE INCLUSIVE PRACTITIONER
    (Compulsory) wwu401
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will encourage students to think about the centrality of inclusive practice and how this is influenced by practitioners’ own value base. It will look at how and why children, young people and families can become socially excluded and will look at the implications for inclusive practitioners.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 48.00 Independent : 152.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Explore the complexity of personal and professional values
    • Explore principles underpinning Human Rights and Social Justice
    • Provide an introduction to the range of factors which can lead to people being socially excluded
    • Provide an introduction to the historical and current social inclusion debate

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Understand the complexity of personal and professional values in influencing how we approach practice  
    • Be aware of the value base which supports inclusive practice
    • Begin to evaluate research in relation to practice
    • Work collaboratively with colleagues in identifying and planning inclusive strategies for children, young people and families

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Group Seminar Discussion (20 minutes)

    Component 2 - 50% Individual Reflective Account (1500 words)

  3. THE SOCIOLOGICAL IMAGINATION
    (Compulsory) wwu404
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Sociological concepts underpin our understandings of society, communities and families. This module will explore the sociological imagination by applying key theories to examples in contemporary society. The module will include examinations of classical sociological theorists including Marx, Durkheim and Weber as well as more contemporary sociology including Critical Race Theory, Feminist Perspectives and Postmodern approaches. The module will also consider the role of the media and discourse in shaping understandings and also critiques of the sociological canon as gendered and Eurocentric.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Explore and critique key theoretical concepts in sociology.
    • Apply sociological concepts to understanding society
    • Engage in a critical analysis of constructions of the family and community in relation to sociological concepts
    • Examine the role the media and discourse have in shaping understandings of society.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Critical examine sociological theory using contemporary examples.
    • Critically evaluate the role of the media and discourse in influencing concepts of society.
    • Critique the sociological canon.
    • Sociologically critique conceptions of the family and community.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 40% Group Presentation (15 minutes)

    Component 2 - 60% Essay (2000 words)

  4. AN INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL POLICY
    (Compulsory) wwu405
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will examine some of the over-arching social policy issues that shape the working agenda around children, young people and families. To do this it will be structured around the key issues identified by William Beveridge as the ‘giants’ of social policy – education, poverty, housing, health (including safeguarding and protection of the vulnerable) and work. These topics will be analysed in the context of the challenges that face professionals working within the current model of the welfare state.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims: 

    • To (begin to) equip students with skills to analyse policy
    • To provide students with a clear understanding of the origins of the welfare state
    • To allow students to examine the impact of poverty and deprivation on CYPF
    • To explore the way key services are structured and delivered
    • To examine the direction of travel in which the welfare state is being taken and to look at alternative models of welfare delivery

     

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Develop a better understanding of the role of social policy as a discipline
    • Understand the historical backdrop to the development of the welfare state
    • Understand how key areas of social policy are determined by their relationship to the welfare state
    • Be able to focus on specific arenas of policy development and delivery – e.g. education, health or housing
    • Begin to analyse the impact of the wider social policy environment on the design and delivery of services to CYPF
    • Be steered towards key thinkers and writers in this field.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 30% Timeline (1500 words)

    Component 2 - 70% Essay (2500 words)

  5. THE INFORMED PRACTITIONER
    (Compulsory) wwu407
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    The module is concerned to develop in students the ability to draw on a wide range of sources for best practice in work with children, young people and families.  The vital importance of listening to young people and their family members will be considered alongside the necessity of drawing on experienced practitioners, research evidence, historical practice and innovation.  The influence and bias of media sources will be critiqued exploring ideas including ‘moral panics’.  Students will be invited to explore how we can involve and empower the people we work with as well as drawing on the best practice developed over years or more recently.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Give students an understanding of the wide range of information sources which can help them improve their practice
    • Promote listening to children, young people and their families as experts on their own lives, needs and strengths
    • Develop understanding of the potential biases within media and research sources and the need for critical evaluation of these.
    • Make links between research and good practice across a range of areas of work with children, young people and families.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the way we listen to children, young people and their advocates
    • Investigate a variety of different information sources relating to work with children, young people and families
    • Understand the likely biases within media and research sources
    • Compare different approaches and attitudes to ‘hot topics’ across history including more innovative practice
    • Develop a portfolio of useful material relating to a ‘hot topic’ of interest

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Patchwork Portfolio in Blog Format (4000 words)

  6. SOCIOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD AND FAMILIES
    (Compulsory) wwu411
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Our experiences of childhood form the indispensable backdrop to almost every aspect of our lives, and for most people these are framed by the kind of family life we have, or want to have. This module will introduce students to the key sociological ideas about childhood and families and explore how these theories can be used to understand the contemporary experience of family life in the UK and elsewhere. It will draw on concrete examples from history and from cutting edge research to explore the nature of the tasks facing practitioners in the field today and to assess the tools which are available to them.  

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 24.00 Independent : 76.00 Placement : Total :  100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Introduce students to the key sociological theories about childhood and family life

    • Show how sociological theory can illuminate controversial or complex aspects of childhood and family life in the contemporary climate.

    • Use sociological theory to compare the current British experience with understandings of childhoods in other times and places.

    • Reflect on the ways in which practitioners might benefit from applying sociological theories of the family in real-world contexts.

    • Familiarise students with the ways in which different ideas about childhood and family affect social life and professional practice.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Explore the ways in which sociological theories of childhood and families can illuminate their own life experiences and those of the people around them.           

    • To study in detail how specific sociological theories were developed and how they relate to one-another

    • To demonstrate a critical awareness of the range of theoretical explanations for different features of childhood and family life.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% ESSAY 2000 WORDS

  7. AN INTRODUCTION TO WORKING WITH CHILDREN, YOUNG PEOPLE AND FAMILIES
    (Compulsory) wwu410
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module aims to give students an introduction to the historical development of services for children, young people and families in the UK and focuses on key events that have shaped those services. The module will look at how notions of ‘vulnerability’ have influenced the way those services are structured and will explore the social and legislative response made by governments and non-statutory organisations to demands for improvements in the way children and families are supported.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Provide students with some historical background to the development of services for children and families.

    • Give them a chance to explore what is meant by the notion of ‘vulnerability’;

    • Give a critical appreciation of legislation in this field;

    • Provide an opportunity to examine the effectiveness of different organisations working in the field.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Engage with the development of key ideas in their chosen area of study;

    • Look at the social history of core services to children and families;       

    • Begin to analyse the quality, design and delivery of services to CYPF;

    • Be steered towards key thinkers and writers in this field.

    • Study how effective legislation has been in the goal of improving services to children and families.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% ESSAY, 2000 WORDS

  1. WORK PLACEMENT
    (Compulsory) plu502
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This year-long module offers learners the opportunity to apply and explore knowledge within a work-based context, through the mode of work place learning. The placement supervisor in the work place will negotiate the focus for the learner’s role on placement, with the learner. Students complete 100 hours in the work setting. The learner will reflect critically on different dimensions of the work place setting.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 10.00 Independent : 90.00 Placement : 100.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Encourage students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing their own placement in a workplace setting.

    • Encourage students to work constructively with their workplace supervisor and university placement tutor, taking ownership of the placement and of their independent learning throughout the experience.

    • Enable students to negotiate the relationship between academic theory and their understanding of workplace settings and their roles within those settings.

    • Encourage students to reflect critically on their experiences.

    • Encourage students to produce a reflective digital resource aimed at an external audience, to contribute towards work and study transitions.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have had the opportunity to: 

    1. Secure, negotiate and undertake a specific role in a workplace setting.

    2. Evaluate features of the workplace setting and their role within it.

    3. Critically evaluate the learning opportunities provided by the workplace experience and understand that learning will benefit current and lifelong learning, values and future employability.

    4. Present a creatively engaging argument within an appropriate digital medium for an external audience, which critically reflects upon an issue or interrelating issues affecting the workplace setting.

     

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - % PLACEMENT REGISTRATION FORM

    Component 2 - 60% WORK PLACEMENT REFLECTION (2500 WORDS)

    Component 3 - 40% WORK PLACEMENT EVALUATION: DIGITAL RESOURCE (1500 WORDS EQUIVALENT)

  2. UNDERSTANDING DISCRIMINATION
    (Compulsory) wwu503
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Discrimination exists in many forms in British society, having a negative impact on the lives of children, young people and families. It is therefore essential that practitioners understand discrimination. This module will explore the historical context for discrimination in the UK, who has the power to discriminate and how discrimination is experienced. The module will also critically evaluate theories of discrimination, including Critical Race Theory, Feminisms and the Personal, Cultural and Structural model of understanding discrimination. The module will focus on exploring discrimination of different groups in society and the intersection and overlap of inequalities. A central focus of the module will be on the policy response to discrimination in the UK, the roles and responsibilities of institutions in relation to discrimination, and examining the extent to which the issues have been addressed.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Explore the concept of discrimination
    • Discuss the power relation in society in relation to discrimination.
    • Critically evaluate the theories of discrimination.
    • Apply theories of discrimination to their impact on children, young people and families.
    • Critically evaluate the UK policy response to discrimination.
    • Examine institutional responses and responsibilities to discrimination.
    • Act as a link between Level 4 and Level 6 modules on identity and inequality.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Engage in a discussion of the concept of discrimination.           
    • Explore the historical context for discrimination in the UK.
    • Explain why discrimination is a persistent feature of society.
    • Apply theory to critical analyse discrimination in society.
    • Critically examine the role of institutions in relation to discrimination.
    • Evaluate the impact of discrimination on children, young people and families.
    • Apply their theoretical understandings to their work based learning environment.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Essay (4000 words)

  3. PERSPECTIVES ON LIFE COURSE
    (Optional) wwu504
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    Module Summary: The stages in the life course from pre-birth through to later life and death are shaped by historical, social, environmental and structural contexts. This module will enable students to explore different ways of understanding the stages of the life course, and consider how the lives of individuals and families are shaped at different times. Students will reflect on life course stages through the lens of their own lived experiences, and consider the implications of life course for practice in working with children, young people and families. CATS Value: 20 ECTS Value: 10 Contact Hours: Scheduled: 36 Independent: 164 Placement: 0 Total hours: 200 Module Curriculum Led Outcomes: This module aims to: • Develop a detailed understanding of the different stages in the Life Course • Explore different perspectives on different stages in the Life Course and how these inform lived experiences • Develop an understanding of how these perspectives are shaped by historical, social, environmental and structural factors • Consider a range of international perspectives of Life Course and critically reflect on the implications for practice Learning Opportunities: Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: • Evaluate the key stages in life course development • Evaluate how understandings of key stages are influenced by time and place • Critically reflect on personal experiences of the Life Course and how these have shaped their understandings Assessment: Component 1: 50% 2000 word essay reflecting on own personal experiences of the Life Course and how these have been shaped by external factors. Component 2: 50% Group presentation (20 minutes); How does time and place shape how we think about different stages of the Life Course
  4. WORKING THERAPEUTICALLY WITH CHILDREN, YOUNG PEOPLE AND FAMILIES
    (Optional) wwu505
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will provide students with the opportunity to explore theoretical and practical notions of therapeutic working with young people.  Students will consider the contrasts in professional roles regarding training, expectations and methods of working therapeutically.  While not offering a therapeutic qualification, the module will consider aspects of best practice regarding the working alliance, ethical guidelines and the importance of support and supervision.  Consideration will be given to the benefits and challenges of working in groups, using creative approaches and working with families.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Give students an understanding of the complexities of working therapeutically with children, young people and families
    • Develop students’ awareness regarding good practice in therapeutic work
    • Explore the needs of children, young people and families and the professionals who work with them therapeutically
    • Develop understanding of varied approaches which may be beneficial for children, young people and families.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the range and influence of professionals who work therapeutically with children, young people and families
    • Use research to support different methods and approaches to work with children, young people and families
    • Understand the importance of ethics and boundaries in therapeutic work
    • Investigate and debate key issues facing practitioners working in this area.
    • Devise a programme of intervention with appropriate aims, methods and working partnerships.
    • Reflect on the ethical and practical challenges of therapeutic work with children, young people and families.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 60% Group Presentation (15 minutes, plus 5 minutes of questions)

    Component 2 - 40% Reflective Account (1500 words)

  5. CHANGING CHILDHOODS: THE CULTURAL AND ARTISTIC REPRESENTATION OF CHILDREN, YOUNG PEOPLE AND FAMILIES
    (Optional) wwu506
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will look from an historical perspective at the way our ideas of ‘childhood’ have been constructed and have changed with the passage of time. Social and political attitudes towards children, young people and families are frequently not part of an explicit public debate or discussion but are coded into our cultural and artistic outputs. This module will examine the role played by art and culture in reproducing models of family and childhood and explore music, art, photography, film and literary output as locations for contested ideas to be debated and played-out around the role of family and the status of children and young people.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Provide students with an introduction to the the way in which ideas of childhood are socially situated
    • Enable students to understand the importance of the arts and culture in the reproduction of key discourses of childhood
    • Allow students to experience a range of artistic modes that address themselves to the issues faced by CYPF
    • Analyse the impact of artistic and cultural output on the behaviour and understanding of current practitioners.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Develop a better understanding of the artistic and cultural context within which our ideas of childhood have developed
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the key thinkers and ideas that have shaped the debate;
    • Apply this understanding to current practice
    • Gain a basic critical appreciation of the discipline of cultural studies       
    • Develop a more detailed appreciation of specific cultural outputs and sets of ideas or discourses that may have significance for future service development.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Paired Presentation (20 minutes)

  6. UNDERSTANDING DISABILITY
    (Compulsory) wwu508
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will enable students to develop an understanding and analysis of disability that builds on the issues they engage with in the Level 4 module entitled ‘The Inclusive Practitioner’. The content of the module will be based on a human rights model and will encourage students to see issues relating to both physical and learning disabilities in their social, political and ideological context. The module will enable the students to understand that issues of disability are best understood through an anti-discriminatory, values-led approach and not via a diagnostic or medical perspective.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Provide students with an understanding of how social attitudes towards disability are socially constructed
    • Enable students to understand the importance of the historical development of ideas relating to disability
    • Engage with contentious ideas about current ideas of disability have developed historically and how these may develop in the future
    • Analyse the impact of this debate on current practitioners.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Develop a better understanding of the way in which our understanding of physical and learning disabilities have developed
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the key theories, ideas and legislation that have shaped the debate
    • Apply this understanding to current practice
    • Look in more detail at how anti-discriminatory and inclusive practice can be developed.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Group Presentation (15 minutes plus questions)

    Component 2 - 50% Reflective Piece (up to 2000 words)

  7. GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES ON CHILDHOOD
    (Compulsory) wwu509
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module seeks to explore the way in which childhood is socially constructed within particular contexts and the consequences, particularly the broader ethical, moral and practical consequences of this. The module will focus on the relationship between constructions of childhood and the policy implications in different contexts. Particular attention will be paid to political ideology, human rights, migration, globalisation and neo-colonial analyses.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Critically explore how childhood is constructed in different contexts around the globe
    • Engage in a critical analysis of policy approaches towards children in different countries
    • Critically examine political ideology, human rights, migration, globalisation and neo-colonial analyses
    • Explore British approaches to childhood and related policy approaches in comparison to global perspectives.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Understand a critically interrogate constructions of childhoods in global contexts
    • Apply theoretical concepts to understand policy approaches in different countries
    • Critique Western universalist assumptions of childhood and policy approaches
    • Explore and critically analyse British constructs of childhood and policy in a global context.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 30% Presentation (15 minutes)

    Component 2 - 70% Essay (3000 words)

  8. GETTING TO GRIPS WITH RESEARCH
    (Optional) wwu500
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This research module aims to develop students’ research literacy, knowledge and understanding of research theory with a view to helping them understand where, why and how research was developed and its relationship to practice. It will also explore the choices of methodologies used for different research projects and consider the constraints and influences that have led to the research being undertaken in the way it was.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 24.00 Independent : 76.00 Placement : Total :  100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Demystify the term research and build student confidence in approaching research

    • Explore the notion of research, and the different types of research (e.g. social research, psychological research, Government Research)

    • Develop students' research literacy with a view to helping them understand where, why and how the research was developed and its relationship to practice

    Explore research methodology theory including quantitative, qualitative and action research

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Evaluate different approaches to researching the same topic

    • Offer definitions for and discuss a range of research terminology and understand the processes involved in carrying out a research project

    • Understand what research ethics are and how to ensure that ethical considerations are in place when conducting research

    • Be able to identify what makes an appropriate research methodology and critique a project’s purpose, methods and potential impact

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Written Critique 2500 words

  9. GETTING READY FOR YOUR CAPSTONE RESEARCH PROJECT
    (Optional) wwu520
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will build on the knowledge and understanding of research theory that was developed in Module WWU500.  It will focus on strengthening the knowledge, understanding and skills needed for students to proceed with their Capstone Research Project at level 6.  The module will help students to explore the Capstone Research Project options so that they can make informed decisions/choices.  The module will identify what the options are and will introduce a range of appropriate research and/or communication tools for each option.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 24.00 Independent : 76.00 Placement : Total :  100.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Explore the options available for undertaking a Capstone Research Project at Level 6.

    • Explore the range of research approaches available for each of the Capstone Research Projects.

    • Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of a range of research and communication tools, as appropriate for each Capstone Research Project option.

    • Enable students to design effective research tools for their preferred option that are fit for purpose and meet ethical requirements.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Identify the options available for Capstone Research Projects. 

    • Evaluate the options available for Capstone Research Projects.

    • Evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages of a range of research approaches and tools in the context of their preferred Capstone Research Project.

    • Understand what research ethics are and how to ensure that ethical considerations are in place when conducting research

    • Discuss the issues involved in planning and undertaking a research project.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Rationale for a research project, 2500 words

  1. SAFEGUARDING AND CHILD PROTECTION IN POLICY AND PRACTICE
    (Compulsory) wwu603
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will provide students with the opportunity to explore historical and contemporary concerns that have served to shape policy and practice. Students will explore current legislation and its implications for practice for all those working with the young and vulnerable adults. A clearer understanding will be gained of the different roles and responsibilities of those working in the area of safeguarding. Consideration will be given to the impact that abuse can have on the lives of victims and their families.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Give students an understanding of the different forms of abuse and neglect that some children and young people experience in their day-to-day lives
    • Develop students’ ability to demonstrate how and why the policy and practice focus of safeguarding has changed over time
    • Critically evaluate how current legislation is likely to impact on safeguarding children and vulnerable adults
    • Explore the different roles and responsibilities that professional undertake in child protection and of the tensions and contradictions which can arise from this.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the way in which policy and practice for safeguarding has developed
    • Outline and analyse the content and intentions of key legislation within the area of safeguarding and child protection
    • Understand the forms that abuse can take and its implications for both victims and practitioners
    • Investigate and debate key issues facing practitioners working in this area.
    • Demonstrate an ability to synthesise arguments and understand the different principles that can inform practice
    • Apply different theoretical perspectives to develop an improved understanding of safeguarding and child protection work.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Essay (3500 words)

  2. OVERCOMING INEQUALITIES IN SOCIETY
    (Compulsory) wwu609
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module builds on a series of inequalities modules in the WWCYPF Programme (e.g. WWU401, WWU503, WWU508). The module will begin to explore the social history of a range of movements (for example the Labour Movement; the Women’s Movement; the Disability Movement; the Civil Rights Movement; the Gay Rights Movement, etc.) that have challenged inequalities and issues of social justice.  The module will also analyse why and how the movements came into existence, and critically reflect on how successful they were/are and what has been learned about overcoming inequalities.   

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Explore issues of inequalities through the lens of social history.
    • Examine the ideological, philosophical and social constructs that lead to inequalities.
    • Critically explore the social history of a range of movements that have challenged issues of inequality.
    • Critically reflect on why these movements were/are needed and consider how successful they have been in tackling inequalities.
    • Analyse what we have learned about overcoming inequalities, through examining the stories and experiences of these movements.

     

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Research the social history and roles of collective movements in attempting to address inequalities.
    • Critically evaluate what impact social movements have had on issues of inequality and social justice.
    • Critically reflect on what has been learned, from these movements, about approaches to overcoming inequalities and issues of social justice.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Booklet (4000 word equivalent)

  3. VOICE, RIGHTS AND REPRESENTATION
    (Optional) wwu607
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will focus on developing critical understandings of concepts of advocacy in different contexts. Central to the module is an exploration of how advocacy can have a role in challenging oppression, with particular emphasis on understanding issues of voice, human rights and representation for marginalised groups.  Applied advocacy, in its different forms, will be critically analysed drawing out issues related to power and with some emphasis on the potential for children, young people and communities becoming their own advocates.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Critically reflect on the underpinning definitions, and associated values and principles, of advocacy
    • Critically reflect on the need for advocacy in challenging oppression, with particular emphasis on understanding issues of voice, human rights and representation for marginalised groups
    • Critically analyse understandings of listening and the inherent tensions in policy and practice
    • Critically analyse understandings of applied advocacy in different contexts.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Identify some of the key models of advocacy and associated benefits, tensions and complexities
    • Demonstrate and understanding of the role of personal, professional and institutional values in supporting advocacy in different contexts
    • Evaluate understandings of voice, rights and representation
    • Apply understandings of advocacy to examples of practice in working with different communities
    • Design a campaign in response to an issue of advocacy.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Group Presentation (20 minutes)

    Component 2 - 50% Reflective Essay (2000 words)

  4. WORKING WITH FAMILIES FACING VIOLENCE AND HARM
    (Optional) wwu604
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module explores some practical challenges of working with families where there are concerns around violence, harm and/or abuse.  It seeks to explore different ways of thinking about vulnerability and risk and how this relates to the ways in which families are constructed in policy and practice. It also seeks to look at key practice issues around working with family members and other professionals.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Build critical understanding of issues relating to domestic violence and other harm within the family, including the human rights context and concepts of ‘vulnerability’, ‘harm’ and ‘violence’
    • Explore the way in which families, are constructed by policy and practice in this area, including perspectives from outside the UK
    • Encourage a nuanced view of risk factors and connections between victimisation and perpetrating violence, and between violence and concerns such as substance misuse
    • Address tensions in policy regarding safeguarding, partnership working and supporting families to achieve their own solutions.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the challenges and opportunities in working with families exposed to violence and harm.
    • Discuss and challenge misconceptions and stereotypes in this area with reference to literature and policy.
    • Critically evaluate representations of violence and harm and models of working with families.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of wider cultural issues relating to harm and violence including perspectives from outside the UK.
    • Critique policy and practice examples balancing the needs of adults and children and between protection, rights and self-efficacy.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Digital Story

    Component 2 - 50% Evaluative Commentary 1500 words

  5. WORKING IN PARTNERSHIP WITH ORGANISATIONS AND COMMUNITIES
    (Optional) wwu613
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    Given the changing nature of children’s services in line with a neoliberalist agenda, understanding both how organisations and communities function and the roles that individuals play within each of those is important. Therefore students need to understand both the role of values at an institutional level, and how partnership working is developed and sustained across organisations and communities. Students will need to understand theory such as street-level bureaucracy, (de)professionalization, levels of policy communication, community development, empowerment, democracy and representation.  

    The module will also allow students to consider the impact of these theoretical models on their own behaviour as practitioners.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Develop students’ understanding of partnership working both within and across organisations and communities within a neoliberal political agenda;
    • Develop students understanding of theory such as street-level bureaucracy, (de)professionalization, policy communication, empowerment and community development;
    • Develop students ability to understand and critically analyse the barriers and challenges to working in partnership within organisations and communities.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Examine and critically analyse the challenges, opportunities and implications for practice when working in partnership in organisations and communities;
    • Develop a critical appreciation of the history of partnership and community working and the role of the community development worker;
    • Apply this understanding to current practice.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Action Plan (approximately 2500 words)

    Component 2 - 50% Essay (approximately 2500 words)

  6. CAPSTONE PROJECTS
    (Optional) wwu601
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module provides students with the opportunity to explore an area of particular interest through undertaking a small project supported by a member of staff from the subject area (or elsewhere) with appropriate specialist knowledge. Students select one of three options, either; a dissertation, the “open talent” project in conjunction with the Foyer Federation, OR a consultancy project.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 26.00 Independent : 374.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  400.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Enable students to identify a research or workplace problem and articulate a question/hypothesis relevant to one of the three projects to which they have opted.
    • Enable students to acquire and apply a breadth of knowledge about the issue or phenomena in which they are engaged
    • Enable students to select appropriate methods in relation to identified research or workplace purposes (open talent project, consultancy, or dissertation ) and justify their employment
    • Support students in the development, revision and refinement of their project design
    • Promote effective autonomous practice in the organisation and management of small-scale project.
    • Enable students to develop creative and innovative approaches to disseminating project findings.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:          

    • Demonstrate a breadth of knowledge and understanding of the issue or phenomena in which they have been engaged
    • Locate appropriate methods in relation to their chosen area of study
    • Understand the basic principles of effective project design
    • Know about some of the key contemporary thinking in their chosen area of study
    • Identify a research or workplace problem and articulate relevant question/hypothesis
    • Work autonomously in the management of a small scale project with guidance from an allocated supervisor
    • Present a coherent study – either through written means or more creative methods - that details the choice of field of study, methods, and findings
    • Develop their capacity for critical reflection and questioning.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Dissertation (10,000 words) or 'Open Talent' Project (10,000 word equivalent) or Consultancy Project (10,000 words)

  7. NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT
    (Optional) plu601
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module offers students the opportunity to build on their level 5 work placement through the more developed application of a negotiated work-based research project. Students will agree with their placement tutor and workplace mentor a brief for a project which addresses a need within the organisation. Learners should complete a minimum of 100 hours in the work place. It is in the spirit of this module that wherever possible, the focus will be on social or community / sustainable development.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 24.00 Independent : 276.00 Placement : 100.00 Total :  400.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

     

    • Enable students to take responsibility for initiating, directing and managing a negotiated work-based research project

    • Encourage students to use appropriate work-based research methods

    • Enable students to work collaboratively in a work setting, establishing continuity from their previous work placement and offering tangible evidence of building on this prior experience, where possible

    • Generate confidence and security in students’ employability on graduation

     

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

     

    • Secure, negotiate and design a work-based research project

    • Develop an understanding of, and apply, research methods that are appropriate to work-based contexts

    • Interpret gathered information

    • Make a clear and productive contribution to the organization through the development of recommendations arising from the work-based research project

    • Present a creatively engaging argument

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% NEGOTIATED WORK-BASED RESEARCH PROJECT (8000 WORDS)

  8. OVERCOMING INEQUALITIES IN SOCIETY
    (Optional) wwu609
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module builds on a series of inequalities modules in the WWCYPF Programme (e.g. WWU401, WWU503, WWU508). The module will begin to explore the social history of a range of movements (for example the Labour Movement; the Women’s Movement; the Disability Movement; the Civil Rights Movement; the Gay Rights Movement, etc.) that have challenged inequalities and issues of social justice.  The module will also analyse why and how the movements came into existence, and critically reflect on how successful they were/are and what has been learned about overcoming inequalities.   

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to: 

    • Explore issues of inequalities through the lens of social history.
    • Examine the ideological, philosophical and social constructs that lead to inequalities.
    • Critically explore the social history of a range of movements that have challenged issues of inequality.
    • Critically reflect on why these movements were/are needed and consider how successful they have been in tackling inequalities.
    • Analyse what we have learned about overcoming inequalities, through examining the stories and experiences of these movements.

     

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: 

    • Research the social history and roles of collective movements in attempting to address inequalities.
    • Critically evaluate what impact social movements have had on issues of inequality and social justice.
    • Critically reflect on what has been learned, from these movements, about approaches to overcoming inequalities and issues of social justice.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 100% Booklet (4000 word equivalent)

  9. LOOKED AFTER CHILDREN
    (Optional) wwu606
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    MODULE SUMMARY :

    This module will provide students with the opportunity to explore current legislation and its implications for practice for all those working with Looked After Children.  The module will seek to examine the rhetoric within policy and initiatives concerning Looked After Children and the underlying political ideologies around the role of the state in caring for children.  Students will investigate the range of provision for Looked After Children including models popular in other countries.  A wide view of the diverse needs of Looked After Children will be presented, underlining the challenges in balancing protection and support with learning and development and the associated importance of partnership and collaborative working.

    CONTACT HOURS :

    Scheduled : 36.00 Independent : 164.00 Placement : 0.00 Total :  200.00

    MODULE CURRICULUM LED OUTCOMES :

    This module aims to:

    • Give students a critical understanding of policy priorities and legislation relating to Looked After Children
    • Develop students’ awareness of the diverse needs of Looked After Children and some of the tensions in meeting these needs within alternative settings
    • Examine the different roles and responsibilities that professionals undertake in supporting Looked After Children
    • Critically explore ways of working effectively with other professionals, family members and young people themselves.

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES :

    Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to:

    • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the influences on policy and practice development for Looked After Children
    • Investigate how to support Looked After Children and young people
    • Assess the impact that living in care can have on the lives and ‘outcomes’ of Looked After Children
    • Investigate and debate key issues facing practitioners working with Looked After Children
    • Evaluate strategies for effective working with other professionals, carers, family members and young people to promote listening and learning
    • Demonstrate an ability to synthesise arguments and understand the different principles that can inform practice.

    METHOD OF ASSESSMENT :

    Component 1 - 50% Group Presentation 10 - 15 mins

    Component 2 - 50% Written Analysis 2000 words

  10. WORKING WITH COMMUNITIES
    (Optional) wwu610
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    Module Summary: This module takes a critical look at the way professionals work with, in or alongside communities. It will examine the different philosophies that are implicit in terms such as ‘community development’, ‘community work’ and ‘community education’. Students will be introduced to competing and sometimes conflicting theories in this field of study and will be expected to engage with and critically analyse terms such as ‘empowerment’, accountability, democracy and representation. The module will also allow students to consider the impact of these theoretical models on their own behaviour as practitioners. Contact Hours: Scheduled: 36 Independent: 164 Placement: 0 Total Hours: 200 Module Curriculum Led Outcomes: This module aims to: • Provide students with an understanding of the complex nature of the debate around how best to work in and alongside communities • Encourage students to develop a critical interpretation of the role of the community development worker • Engage with contentious ideas about community work from different sectoral perspectives • Analyse the impact of this debate on current practice in the field of WCYPF Learning Opportunities: Students will, by the end of the module, have the opportunity to: • Engage with theoretical models of community work, community development and community education • Develop a critical appreciation of the history and role of the community development worker • Demonstrate an understanding of the key thinkers and ideas that have shaped the debate • Apply this understanding to current practice • Look in more detail at specific sets of ideas or discourses that may have significance for future service development. Assessment: Component 1: 100% Portfolio of work that should include: